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Ha Hb He Hi Hj Hm Ho Hs Hu Hy


Dews, Harry
[1864-1928] Born in Halifax.

He was a gas retort maker [1889].

On 16th November 1889, he married Wilhelmina Hirst [1870-1908] at Saint Thomas's Church, Claremount.


Wilhelmina was born in Warrington
 

Children: (1) Edith Alice [b 1891]; (2) Wallace; (3) Otis [1897-1899]; (4) Ruth Hetty [b 1899]; (5) Ethel [b 1901]; (6) Annie [b 1904].

The family lived at 5 Henage Street, New Park Road, Queensbury [1911]

H. B. Radio
Company established by John D. Pinchbeck at Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd. They produced Pilot radios

H: R. H.
The pediment on the low, central section of a row of buildings on the south side of Commercial Street, Brighouse is inscribed RH 1852


Question: Does anyone know who R H was?

 

Habergham's
Ruth Habergham and her daughter, Nora, were in business as haberdashers and clothiers at 18 Market Street, Hebden Bridge [1907, 1911]

Habergham ...
The entries for people with the surname Habergham are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Habergham
Although not a local surname, having originated at Habergham Eaves in Lancashire, several people with the name are recorded in the district.

There are currently around 26 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Habergham. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other.

The name is pronounced Habbergam

Habitation
See The Primrose League

Hack, Charles
[1843-1897] Born in Wolverhampton.

He was landlord of the Temperance Hotel, Halifax [1871, 1874]; a caterer at 15 North Parade, Halifax [1881, 1891, 1897].

In 1869, he married Emma Goodall from Halifax, in Birmingham.

Probate records show an estate valued at £2,249

Hack, Rev G.
[18??-19??] Methodist minister in Halifax. Recorded in 1906, when he preached the Anniversary Sermon of the Wesleyan School, Triangle

Hackett, Ada
[1800-1831] Of Halifax.

She died after James Smith struck her with his fist. Smith was acquitted of a charge of manslaughter

Hackett, G.
[19??-19??] Curate at Sowerby Bridge [1933] and Assistant Curate at Norland [1933, 1934]

Hackett, Mary
[1946-1952] The 6-year-old girl disappeared in August 1952. Her body was discovered 6 weeks later in the foundations of Park Congregational Church, Halifax

Haddon, Robert
[1851-1896] Around 1877, he married Annie Jessie [1857-19??].

Children: (1) Ellis [b 1883] who was a school mistress [1911]; (2) Marguerite [b 1890]; (3) Robert Stephenson [b 1894] who was a bank clerk [1911]; (4) child; (5) child; (6) child; (7) child who died.

They lived at 32 Clare Road, Halifax [1911]

Haddy, Rev William T.
[18??-19??] Minister at Bethesda Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Elland [1903]

Hadley & Priestley
Recorded in 1874 at Saint James's Road Turkish Baths, Halifax. Partners included Herbert Hadley

Hadley, Herbert
[1828-1908] Born in Stockport, Cheshire.

He acquired Saint James's Road Turkish Baths, Halifax and moved the business to 5 King Cross Street.

Partner in Hadley & Priestley.

In some sources, his name appears as Adderley

On 5th August 1847, he married Elizabeth Appley [1826-1900] in Lancaster.

Children: (1) William [1848] who died in infancy; (2) Ann Amelia [1849-1929] who married Thomas Samuel Lainton; (3) Emma [1851-1926] who married George Walsh; (4) John [1852] who died in infancy; (5) Herbert.

Elizabeth died in Liverpool [5th July 1900]. Herbert died in Liverpool [21st November 1908]

Hadley, Herbert
[1855-1942] Son of Herbert Hadley

Born in Leeds [9th April 1855].

About 1879, for reasons which are unclear, he was sent to New Zealand.

In 1883, he married (1) Janet Maudeline McIntyre, in Napier, New Zealand.

Children: (1) Louis / Lewis Herbert [1883-1968]; (2) Eva Gertrude [b 1885].

He went by the name Charles Joseph Herbert Hedley.

About 1893, he deserted his family and moved to Australia where he went by the name Charles Joseph Herbert Anthony Hedley;

He married (2) Frances.

Children: (3) child; (4) child; (5) child; (6) child; (7) child; (8) child; (9) child; (10) child; (11) child; (12) child.

He died in New South Wales [22nd March 1942]

Hadlow, Halifax
Albert Promenade.

Owners and tenants have included

The Hadwen family
Cotton and silk spinning family. They originally came from Bolton, Lancashire and moved to the Soyland district where they built and/or occupied Kebroyd Mills, Triangle. Mr Hadwen was an early member of the family.

See Kebroyd Hall

Hadwen & Wilson
Cotton spinners at Kebroyd Lower Mill [1811]. Partners included Thomas Hadwen

Hadwen, Arthur
[1839-19??] Son of John Hadwen.

Born in Soyland.

In 1861, he was working as a mechanic. He emigrated to the United States [by 1880] and settled in German, Indiana.

He married an Englishwoman named Mary

Hadwen's Brass Band
The brass band of John Hadwen & Sons Limited at Ripponden.

Recorded in 1853, when Richard Thomas joined the Band

Hadwen, Eliza
[1812-1879] Of The Dean, Sowerby. Daughter of John Hadwen.

In 1845, she laid the foundation stone at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones.

She was buried at the church

Hadwen, Elizabeth Whittaker
[1804-1888] Youngest child of Thomas Hadwen.

She did not marry.

In 1861, she was living alone in Lower Lumb, Sowerby and her occupation was given as yearly income.

In 1881, she was an annuitant, living in Brook Cottages, Soyland, Yorks with a 29 year old female lodger

She died in Sowerby.

She was buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones

Hadwen, Ellen
[1817-1842] Of Dean, in Sowerby. Daughter of John Hadwen.

She was said to be very pious.

She died 24th July 1842. She was buried at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby [29th July 1842] in the Hadwen vault there.

In her will, she left bequests to various missionary and religious societies, including £50 to

the Society for Instructing the Irish in their own Tongue

She also left £500

to found a church within 1 mile of Mill Bank, within 5 years of her death

Her only surviving sister, Eliza, laid the foundation stone of Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones in 1845

Hadwen, Frederick Walter
[1850-1921] JP.

The younger son of George Burgess Hadwen.

Born in Soyland.

He was a silk spinner [1895, 1901].

He was a partner in the family business, John Hadwen & Sons Limited at Ryburn House Mill, Ripponden and Kebroyd Mills.

He was President of the Ripponden & District Technical School.

He was reported in the press to be

a bogus company promoter in Manchester

On 5th December 1901, application was granted to charge him and Alfred Ingham under the Bankruptcy Act [1869] for alleged falsification of a balance sheet, making false entries in the balance sheet and in the rough stock book, obtaining money by false representation and not repaying it, incurring a debt with the Halifax & Huddersfield Union Banking Company, and obtaining credit by false pretences.

They were indicted at Leeds Assizes for false pretences and other offences. The 2 men had separate defence counsels and each pleaded not guilty, and placed the wrongdoing on the other party. The Jury found both men guilty.

They were both convicted but the convictions were quashed by the Court for the Consideration of Crown Cases, on the grounds that, at the original trial at the assizes, the court had improperly refused to allow counsel for one defendant to cross-examine the other defendant, who had elected to give evidence on his own behalf.

In May 1906, he was in partnership with Alfred Ingham – trading as John Hadwen & Sons Limited at Kebroyd Mills – when they were declared bankrupt.

In 1911, he was a land agent.

In 1882, he married Anna Mary Waugh at Cockermouth, Cumberland.

Children: (1) John Walter [b 1883]; (2) Noel Waugh; (3) Frederick Guy [b 1890].

The family lived at Ryburn House, Ripponden [1891]; Kebroyd Hall, Triangle [1911]; The Dene, Triangle [1921].

He died on 2nd July 1921.

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £166 15/7d. Probate was granted to his widow Anna Mary.

He and Anna Mary were buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones

Hadwen, George
[1831-1887] Son of John Hadwen.

He was a woollen and cotton dyer.

On 4th October 1855, he married Mary Redfearn [1830-1886] in Bradford.


Mary was the daughter of Ellen [née Wear] and Gabriel Redfearn
 

The marriage ended in divorce by 1878

Hadwen, George Arthur
[1849-1894] Known as Arthur.

Elder son of George Burgess Hadwen.

Born in Soyland.

He was a silk-spinner [1871].

On 2nd September 1874, he married Charlotte Amy Maxwell [1854-1906] in Elgin, Scotland.

The family lived at Staveley Bank, Halifax [1894]

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1894

His widow died at Tredinnock, Stirling. Probate records show that she left a personal estate valued at £13,810

Hadwen, George Burgess
[1815-1895] Son of John Hadwen.

In the 1830s, he was one of the supporters for the new Saint George's Church, Sowerby.

In 1870, he gave a new bell to Ripponden Parish Church.

He was a silk spinner employing 400 hands at Kebroyd Mills [1881]. He and his brother Thomas Wilson were partners in John Hadwen & Sons.

On 28th April 1846, he married Georgiana Selina Davies [1823-1895] from Wiltshire, at Saint Pancras, London.

Children: (1) Mary Alice [b 1847] who married John Henry Bridges; (2) George Arthur; (3) Frederick Walter; (4) Edith Georgiana [1852-1908]; (5) Louisa Amy [b 1854] who married Charles James D. Astley; (6) Susan Ellen [b 1858] who married [1891] Edward Maurice Hill; (7) Nora [b 1862] who married Leonard Trelawney Hobhouse.

The family lived at Ryburn House, Soyland [1851]; Torquay [1861]; Kebroyd House, Ripponden [1871, 1881, 1891].

George died 1st February 1895.

Georgina Selina died in Eastbourne [7th March 1895].

He was buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones.

Probate records show effects valued at £53,906 6/4d to son Frederick Walter and Edward Maurice Hill.

Probate records show effects valued at £3,167 7/10d to son Frederick Walter

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1895

Hadwen, Rev John
[1740-1803] He married Mary Burgess.

Children: (1) Thomas; (2) John; (3) Jonathan Burgess [bapt 1776]; (4) Elizabeth [bapt 1778]; (5) Mary [bapt 1778]; (6) George Burgess [1780-1814]

Hadwen, John
[1773-1852] Son of Rev John Hadwen.

He was in partnership at Kebroyd Mills with his brother, Thomas, until the partnership was dissolved in 1805. The firm then became John Hadwen & Sons.

On 9th March 1803, he married Mary [1776-1819], daughter of Mr Wilson.

Children: (1) Thomas Wilson; (2) John; (3) Sidney; (4) Ellen [1808-1809] who died aged 11 months; (5) Mary Ann [1809-1826]; (6) Eliza; (7) Charlotte [bapt 1813]; (8) George Burgess; (9) Ellen.

The family lived at Dean House, Sowerby [1841, 1851].

In 1854, he bought Kebroyd Hall, Soyland.

The couple were buried at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby: Mary [1st July 1819]; John [25th June 1852].

Other members of the family were buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones.

There are memorials to members of the family at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby

Hadwen, John
[1799-1873] Of Aufhole, Soyland.

Son of Thomas Hadwen. Christened in Oldham.

On 31st October 1827, he married Mary Ann Shaw [1804-1889] from Huddersfield, at Huddersfield.

Children: (1) Mary [b 1829] who married James Brittain [1838-1901], a Middlesbrough tailor; (2) Thomas [b 1830] who married Elizabeth in London; (3) George; (4) John Russell; (5) Henry Shaw [b 1836]; (6) Arthur; (7) Ellen [b 1842]; (8) Ann [1845-1850].

He died in Woburn, Bedfordshire.

Members of the family - including John's sister Elizabeth – were buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones

Hadwen, John
[1805-1862] Of Kebroyd. Son of John Hadwen.

In 1835, he was one of the subscribers to the Halifax Dispensary, giving 1. guinea. He was a silk manufacturer [1861].

He married Elizabeth Hannah James [1808-1892].

They had no children.

John was buried at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby [27th December 1862].

Other members of the family were buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones.

There are memorials to members of the family at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby.

See Rachel Hoyle

Hadwen's: John Hadwen & Sons Limited
Cotton and silk-spinners at Kebroyd Mills. The company was founded by John Hadwen.

They produced silk yarn which was used in the production of lace and silk sewing thread.

In 1901, the company was declared bankrupt and their mills closed. 500 workers were thrown out of work. Partners Frederick Walter Hadwen and Alfred Ingham were accused of fraud.

One of the mills was destroyed by fire on 6th November 1904.

See Mill Bank Working Men's Club

Hadwen, John Russell
[1833-1909] Son of John Hadwen.

He was a dyer; manager of a Model Lodging House in Bradford Road, Dewsbury [1881].

On 21st August 1859, he married (1) Elizabeth Almond [1838-1885], daughter of Elizabeth [née Harrop] and John Almond, in Halifax.

On 14th June 1886, he married (2) Emma Almond [1856-1895], Elizabeth's sister, in Dewsbury. Emma died of TB.

John committed suicide on 9th March 1909 in Birstall. His suicide was probably prompted by gambling debts

Hadwen, John Wilson
[1813-1879] Son of Thomas Wilson Hadwen.

He was a cotton spinner with his brother Joshua Lovel Hadwen at Kebroyd Middle Mill [1855]

Hadwen, Joshua Lovel
[1835-19??] Son of Thomas Wilson Hadwen.

Born in Sowerby.

He was a cotton spinner with his brother John Wilson Hadwen at Kebroyd Middle Mill [1855]; a cotton & silk spinner employing 175 workpeople [1861].

In 1859, he married Wendela Hildegard Donner [1841-1912], from Sweden.

Children: (1) (possibly) Harry Lovel who was buried [10th July 1862] at Sowerby Church aged 16 days; (2) Theodore.

The family lived at 7 Kebroyd Bridge [1861]

Son Theodore became a civil engineer and emigrated to the USA [1892]. Joshua & Wendela followed in 1895 They were all living in Kane, Illinois [1900].

Wendela returned to the UK [after 1900] and travelled between England and the USA [1905 & 1911].

Wendela & Theodore both died in Oak Park, Cook, Illinois

Joshua died between 1900 & 1905 – (possibly) in the USA.

Probate records show that Wendela left an estate valued at £145 2/6d. Her home address is given as 11 Clarence Road, Southsea, England

Hadwen, Mr
[17??-18??] Around 1800, he established the cotton spinning business which eventually became John Hadwen & Sons Limited.

He married Unknown.

Children: John.

He was an early member of the Hadwen family

Hadwen, Noel Waugh
[1886-1916] Son of Frederick Walter Hadwen.

During World War I, he served as a Captain with the B Company 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He died 1st July 1916 (aged 30).

He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial [6A & 6B] and on the World War I Memorial in Sowerby Church

Hadwen, Sidney
[1807-1884] Son of John Hadwen.

Partner in John Hadwen & Sons Limited

Hadwen, Theodore Lovel Donner
[1872-1952] Son of Joshua Lovel Hadwen.

Born in Richmond, Surrey.

He was a Baltic merchant [1871, 1881]; a commercial clerk [1891]; a civil engineer [1892].

He lived at Richmond, Surrey [1871, 1881, 1891].

He emigrated to USA [1892].

His parents followed in 1895.

They were all living in Kane, Illinois [1900 USA census].

In 1902, he married Ida Schelker [1869-1919] in Illinois. Ida's parents were from Switzerland.

Wendela returned to the UK [1900] and travelled between Englnd and the USA [1905 & 1911].

Theodore and his mother Wendela both died in Oak Park, Cook, Illinois

Hadwen, Thomas
[1772-18??] Of Halfhole, Soyland.

Son of Rev John Hadwen. Christened in Huddersfield [15th June 1772].

Cotton spinner in partnership with his brother, John, at Severhills Mill, Ripponden in the early 19th century until 1818, and at Kebroyd Middle Mill. The brothers had learned the cotton spinning trade at Oldham.

Thomas dissolved the partnership was in August 1805. He left Kebroyd Middle Mill and moved to Kebroyd Upper Mill where he became a partner in Hadwen & Wilson.

He was recorded as the owner of Soyland Mill [1816].

He took over Kebroyd Lower Mill from Denton & Holroyd, around 1823.

On 12th March 1797, he married Sarah Whittaker [1774-1816] at Oldham.

Children: (1) Mary [b 1798]; (2) John; (3) Horatio Nelson [1802] who died in infancy; (4) Elizabeth Whittaker.

There are memorials to members of the family at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby

Hadwen, Thomas Wilson
[1803-1855] Son of John Hadwen.

Of Dean House, Sowerby which he inherited from his uncle Joshua Wilson.

Around 1815, he was active in Parliamentary Reform.

He and his brother George Burgess were partners in John Hadwen & Sons.

He married Margaret Lovel [1813-1883].

Children: (1) John Wilson; (2) Mary Emily [b 1832]; (3) Joshua Lovel; (4) Margaret Anne [b 1836] who died aged 11 months and 9 days and was buried [4th January 1837] at Sowerby Church; (5) Margaret [b 1837] who died aged 8 months and 5 days and was buried [29th March 1838] at Sowerby Church; (6) Ellen [b 1840]; (7) Eliza Ann [b 1845].

He died at Bredbury, near Stockport, whilst visiting his daughter Ellen.

After his death, John Hadwen & Sons was dissolved. His sons, carried on the cotton-spinning business at Kebroyd Middle Mill, and his 3 brothers continued the silk spinning business.

Members of the family were buried at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby: Thomas Wilson [19th March 1855].

Other members of the family were buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones.

There are memorials to members of the family at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby

Hagan, Very Rev Oswald M.
[1???-19??] Prior and Parish Priest at Saint Joseph's Catholic Church, Todmorden [1935]

Haggard, Sir H. Rider
[1856-1925] He was the brother-in-law Agnes Marion Barber, and used some of her work in his novels

Haggas, James
[1816-1857] Son of delver James Haggas.

Born in Halifax.

He was a delver [1838, 1841, 1851].

In 1838, he married Hannah Marshall [1819-1???] at Bradford Cathedral.


Hannah, from Elland, was the daughter of delver Thomas Marshall.

She was widowed and a worsted weaver [1861]

 

Children: (1) Grace [b 1839] who was a scholar [1851], a worsted weaver [1861]; (2) Mary [b 1841] who was a worsted spinner [1851], a worsted weaver [1861]; (3) Rebecca [b 1843]; (4) Thomas; (5) Joseph [b 1849] who was a worsted spinner [1861]; (6) Marshall [b 1850] who was a worsted spinner [1861]; (7) Sarah S [b 1856].

The family lived at Mount Pleasant, Thornton [1841, 1851]; 16 Silver Street, Northowram [1861]

Haggas, Thomas
[1846-1905] Son of James Haggas.

Born in Thornton.

He was a stone quarry man [1861]; a stone delver [1871]; a gas stoker [1881]; a stoker [1885]; a stone quarry man [1891]; innkeeper of the Bishop Blaize, Halifax [1901, 1905].

In 1865, he married Ann Slack [1848-1914] from Ovenden, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Hannah [b 1868] who married Thomas Stansfield; (2) James [b 1870]; (3) Ada [b 1873] who was a rotary(?) drawer [1891] and married [1894] Joseph Wilkinson.

The family lived at Jagger's Buildings, Northowram [1871]; Wilson's Court, Halifax [1881]; 14 Eldon Street, Northowram [1891]; 1 Well Street, Halifax [1911].

Living with the widowed Ann in 1911 was her widowed daughter, Ada Wilkinson (charwoman) and grandson Wilfred Wilkinson [aged 8].

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1905

Haggis, Harry
[1863-1900] Son of William Haggis.

Born in Northowram.

He was a wool comber [1883].

In 1883, he married Grace Ann Blagbrough [1863-1952] in Halifax.


Grace Ann was born in Leeds
 

Children: (1) Mary [1884-1960]; (2) Fred [1885-1963]; (3) Edgar [1887-1917] who never married; (4) Granville [1895-1962]; (5) Sarah Ellen [b 1897]; (6) twins Lilian [1900-1981]; (7) Ernest [1900-1901].

The couple died in Halifax

Haggis, John
[1853-1896] Landlord of the Waterhouse Arms, Halifax [1896]. In 1878, he married Eliza Cawthra in Halifax.

They are mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1896

Haggis, William
[18??-1???] Of Queensbury.

Partner in H. Hodgson & Company [1881]

Haggis, William
[1842-1900] Born in Northowram.

He was an overlooker of wool combing machines [1861].

In 1861, he married Azubah Smith [1844-1911] in Halifax.


Azubah was born in Northowram
 

Children: (1) Mary [1861-1931] who married Smith Kay; (2) Harry; (3) Amelia [1865-1916] who married Joseph Fletcher; (4) Emily [1867-1947]; (5) Eliza [1870-1942]; (6) Sidney [1872-1903]; (7) Robert John [1875-1946]; (8) Ann Elizabeth [1878-1947]; (9) Jabez Francis Oscar [1880-1950]; (10) William [1883-1949]; (11) Clara [1885-1952] who married Norman Holmes.

William & Azubah died in Huddersfield

Hagley, James
[18??-18??] Tea dealer at Halifax.

In 1849, he was declared bankrupt

Hagstocks, Shibden Valley
Aisled house.

Owners and tenants have included

This is discussed in The Old Halls & Manor Houses of Yorkshire.

See Lower Hagstocks, Shibden Valley

Hague, Ivan
[1911-1938] Of King Street, Todmorden. On 10th July 1938, he drowned when a sailing dinghy capsized on the river near Ely

Hague, Rev William
[1???-18??] From Rillington. He was Minister at Providence Congregational Church, Elland [June 1831]. In November 1832, he resigned

Hahnel, John
[1833-19??] Born in Austria.

He was a retired chief cashier to worsted manufacturers & spinners [1911].

He married Unknown. [18??-1884]


A note on the 1911 census reads wife died 27 years ago, after 50 years' marriage
 

Children: Gertrude [b 1871].

The family lived at The Gables, Lightcliffe [1911]

Haig & Carter
Woollen manufacturers at Elland [1809]

Haigh...
The entries for people with the surname Haigh are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Haigh
The surname is derived from hage and the element haigh.

Roger del Hagh is recorded at Elland in 1344.

There are currently around 80 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Haigh. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

See Reuben Haigh

The Haigh family of Inchfield
The family were involved in coal mining.

See Foul Clough Coal Mine, Todmorden and Inchfield Coal Mines

The Haigh family of Norland
The family came originally from Scotland. They settled in Norland.

In 1536, they were listed as landowners in the composition for Great Tithes in the parish.

They became a very wealthy family, making their fortunes in wool. They moved into the landed gentry. They acquired land and property in Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and Wales, including

Members of the family have included George Haigh and William Haigh

The Haigh family of Southowram

Haigh's: Abraham Haigh & Sons
Cotton spinners and doublers at Town Ing Mills, Elland [1905]

Haigh's: Allan Haigh & Company Limited
Winding Road, Halifax. Engineering company founded by Allan Haigh in 1895 when he took over the business of Barrett & Company. They manufactured valves and cocks.

After Haigh's death in 1908, the company was taken over by the Hodgson family. The range of products was extended to include pipes and marine fittings.

In 1960s, when Winding Road was redeveloped, the firm moved to premises in Moorfield Street

Haigh & Heppenstall
Cotton spinners and doublers. They were at Bridgefield Mill, Elland [1905, 1914] and Cross Mill, Elland [1905].

Partners included James Heppenstall.

See Edgar Wormald

Haigh Brothers
Partners included John Haigh and William Haigh

Haigh Cote Dam, Wainstalls
Built in 1806 by the Cold Edge Dam Company. This was the first of their dams to be built. Capacity: 11,000,000 gallons. It was enlarged in 1831.

Named for the nearby Haigh Cote Farm, Wainstalls.

It had a capacity of 11,089,049 gallons.

The dam was used for water-skiing in the 1990s. It is now used by the Halifax Water Ski Club

Haigh Cote Farm, Wainstalls
Early 17th century farm at Wainstalls.

Gives its name to Haigh Cote Dam, Wainstalls.

The property fell into disrepair, but is being restored [2012]

Haigh Farm, Mill Bank
This is discussed in Our Home & Country

Haigh's Farm, Sowerby
Towngate. Aka Haigh's Buildings, Rich Man's Dwelling. 15th century timber-framed aisled hall. It was the home of the Haigh family.

In his will [1634], Henry Haigh bequeathed the sum of 26/8d to be paid from rents at the farm and other property in Sowerby, to the preacher at the chapel of Sowerby.

Owners and tenants have included

It was divided into 3 dwellings: 47, 49, 51 Towngate.

In 1961, it was acquired by Durham County Council, dismantled and taken for re-erection at Beamish Museum.

This is discussed in Aisled Houses in the Halifax Area.

See Frank Atkinson

Haigh's: George & John Haigh
Woolstaplers at Woolshops, Halifax [1809]

Haigh's: George Haigh & Company
Cotton spinners at North Bridge Mill, Halifax [1811, 1816]

Haigh, Green & Company
Owned Bankwell Colliery, Cornholme

Haigh Hall, Halifax
See Elizabeth Cotton

Haigh House, Warley
Raw End Road. A property – known as Le Hagh House – is mentioned in a document dated 1498.

The Mawde family lived at a house here in the 16th century. Ed. Mawde is recorded here in 1579.

The present house was built around 1631 by James Murgatroyd on the site of the earlier dwelling.

The porch is dated IMM 1631 for James and Mary Murgatroyd.

The Murgatroyds lived here whilst Murgatroyd was being rebuilt [1632]

as a place to retire to while his great house at Murgatroyd was a-sweeping

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

This is discussed in Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions and In & About Our Old Homes.

See Haigh

Haigh's: J. & H. Haigh
Stone merchants at Northowram.

Partners included J. Haigh and H. Haigh.

The partnership was dissolved in February 1849

Haigh's: John Haigh & Brothers
Cotton and worsted spinners who built Garden Street Mill, Halifax about 1833. Partners included John Haigh

Haigh tree
Popular name given to the hawthorn in the Todmorden & Walsden district.

It is said that Reuben Haigh was found under a Haigh tree

Haigh's: William & Henry Haigh
Manufacturers at Longley [1809]

Haigh's: William Haigh Limited
Drapers, outfitters, and department store on Wharf Street, Sowerby Bridge. Established by William Haigh. Opened in 18??.

In 1920, they were at Centre Mills, Sowerby Bridge and their departments were listed as


General and Fancy Drapery
Dress Materials and Skirts
Hosiery and Gloves
Smallwares
Carpets and Floorcloths
Household Linen
Ladies' and Children's Boots and Shoes
Ladies' and Children's Millinery
Ladies' and Children's Coats and Costumes
Gents' and Boys' Boots and Shoes
Gents' and Boys' Outfitting
Gents' and Boys' Clothing
Gents' and Boys' Hats and Caps

Closed in 19??

Haigh, Wright & Company
Cotton spinners and doublers at Town Ing Mills, Elland [1905]

Hailey, John
[17??-18??] Hatter in Halifax [1788]

Hailey, William
[17??-1???] or Haley. Of Norton. With James Crabtree, he was an informer at the trial of the coiners

Hainer, John
[17??-18??] Hatter in Northowram [1796]

Haines, Rev Reginald Edward Moore
[1???-19??] He had been a Chaplain to the Forces before becoming Vicar of Brighouse [July 1932-1942]. He went on to become Rector of Porlock, Somerset

Haining, Dr
[18??-1???] Recorded in September 1873, when he was acting for Dr William Charteris and attended the casualties in the stone-laying accident at Saint Matthew's Church, Lightcliffe

Hainsworth & Company
Common brewers in Halifax. Recorded in April 1863, when when the partnership was dissolved, as far as regards J. Hainsworth.

See J. & J. Hainsworth

Hainsworth & Fielding
Common brewers at Sowerby Bridge.

Partners included E. Hainsworth and D. Fielding.

The partnership was dissolved in September 1855

Hainsworth, Mrs Ann
[1819-1???] Born in Southowram.

She married John Hainsworth.

Her husband does not appear on censuses after 1861.

She was a common brewer employing 3 men [1871] and a brewer at Bank Brewery, Sowerby Bridge [1874]

Hainsworth, E.
[18??-18??] Partner in brewers Hainsworth & Fielding [1855]

Hainsworth, George
[1???-18??] On 25th March 1835, he married Elizabeth, widow of William Lister of the Lord Nelson, Halifax

He took over as landlord of the Lord Nelson [1837]

Hainsworth, H.
[1866-1907] JP.

Of The Dene, Luddenden. He was Chairman of Midgley District Council. Director of Jonathan Bracken & Sons Limited

Hainsworth, Holden, Swaine & Pollard Bank
In 1779, Timothy Hainsworth, Adam Holden, Robert Swaine, and William Pollard established the first bank in Halifax.

By 1802, Pollard had withdrawn from the firm, which was then Swaine Brothers & Company

Hainsworth, J.
[18??-18??] Plumber at Halifax.

In March 1861, he was declared bankrupt

Hainsworth, J.
[18??-18??] A brewer at Causeway Foot. He and his son James were partners in J. & J. Hainsworth

Hainsworth's: J. & J. Hainsworth
[1???-1???] Halifax brewers.

Partners included J. Hainsworth and his son James Hainsworth.

In June 1854, the partnership was dissolved.

Recorded in July 1863, when they sued Ingham Brothers for injuries received when he and his son James were involved in an accident with one of Ingham's waggons. The Hainsworths were awarded £50 damages.

J. Hainsworth & Company was recorded in November 1863, when the partnership was dissolved, as far as regards J. Hainsworth.

See Hainsworth & Company

Hainsworth, James
[1845-1???] Born in Ovenden.

He was a farmer of 27 acres.

He married Sally [1848-1???], born in Denholme.

Children: (1) Clara [b 1868] who was a worsted spinner [1881]; (2) John Thomas [b 1870] who was a worsted spinner [1881]; (3) Joseph [b 1872]; (4) Arthur [b 1874]; (5) Alice Elizabeth [b 1876]; (6) Willy [b 1879]; (7) Sam [b 1880].

The family lived at Hanging Royd Farm, Northowram [1881]

Hainsworth, John
[1817-1???] Born in Thornton.

He was a coal merchant [1861].

He married Ann.

Children: (1) Mary Jane [b 1843]; (2) Martha Ann [b 1846]; (3) Sarah Maria [b 1851]; (4) Scho[le]field [b 1854] who was a traveller [1881]; (5) Emily [b 1856]; (6) Harriet [b 1863].

The family lived at Wharf Street, Sowerby Bridge [1861]; 2 Fountain Street, Sowerby Bridge [1871]; Industrial Road, Sowerby Bridge [1881]

John does not appear on censuses after 1861, and Ann has taken over the business in 1871

Hainsworth, Schofield
[1854-1894] Born in Wilsden.

He was licensee of the Puzzle Hall Inn, Sowerby Bridge [1891, 1894].

In 1885, he married Lydia Heavysege Marsh

Hainsworth, Timothy
[1???-1???] Partner in Hainsworth, Holden, Swaine & Pollard Bank

Hainsworth, Timothy
[17??-1???] Merchant and shalloon maker in Halifax.

In 1762, he was party to the lease and release of property known as Nook Houses in Cheapside

He occupied Room 75 on the Colonnade of the Piece Hall [1787]

Haking, Rev Richard
[18??-18??] Eldest son of Richard Hacking of Bury, Lancashire.

Vicar at Saint Paul's Church, Halifax [18??].

He married Mary Elizabeth, second daughter of Henry Byrne, at Brighouse Parish Church.

Children: (1) Richard Cyril Byrne; (2) Mary; (3) Ethel; (4) Hilda

Haking, General Sir Richard Cyril Byrne
[1862-1945] GBE, KCB, KCMG.

Son of Rev Richard Haking.

Born in Halifax.

In 1891, he married Rachel Violette Burford-Hancock [18??-1939].


Rachel Violette was the daughter of Sir Henry Burford-Hancock, Chief Justice of Gibraltar
 

From Sandhurst, he joined the 67th / 2nd Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment [1881]. He took part in the Burmese Expedition [1885-1887]. During the South African War, he was commandant at De Aar Junction. In 1901, he became a Professor at the army Staff College.

In 1914, at the outbreak of World War I, he was given command of the 5th Brigade and travelled to the Western Front.

After a head injury, he returned to command the 1st Division from December until September 1915, after which he commanded the XI Corps for the rest of the war. During that period, he was known for being willing to wage a war of attrition, and was one of the generals who established a reputation for incompetence at that time.

In 1924, he was appointed Colonel of the Hampshire Regiment.

Halco
Trade name of the Halifax Tool Company Limited

Halco Drilling International Limited
Manufacturers of rock drilling equipment.

The business was a part of Halifax Tool Company Limited and Marshall's (Halifax) Limited.

It was acquired by the Terex Company of America

Haldesworth, John
[15??-16??] Of Southowram. His will was recorded on 6th October 1655

Haldesworth, John
[15??-1621] Butcher at the House at the Maypole

Haldesworth, Robert
See Robert Holdesworth

Haldeworth
An earlier form of the name Holdsworth

Haldeworth, John de
[1???-1456] Son of John de Haldeworth. In 1423, he acquired land in Northowram from his father.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Richard; (2) John; (3) Robert

Haldeworth, John de
[12??-1???] Of Haldeworth, Hipperholme. An early member of the Holdsworth family of Ashday Hall.

He is recorded at Wakefield Manor Court, held at Rastrick in 1275.

He was a freeman at a court in Wakefield on 28th March 1296.

He married Olive.

Children: (1) John; (2) Thomas [recorded 1361]; (3) William [d 1349]

Haldeworth, John de
[12??-1352] Son of John de Haldeworth.

In 1297, he was bailiff of Hipperholme.

In 1339, he surrendered 4½ acres of land at Hipperholme to his son Richard.

He married Alice.

Children: (1) Richard; (2) John [13??-1362]

Haldeworth, John de
[13??-1392] Of Ashday, Southowram. Son of Richard de Haldeworth.

He married Sibella [13??-1399].

Children: (1) John; (2) William

Haldeworth, John de
[13??-1423] Son of John de Haldeworth.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Richard; (2) John; (3) Robert.

He was buried at Halifax Parish Church

Haldeworth, Richard
[14??-1479] Son of John de Haldeworth.

He married Margaret, sister of John Hoile from Shepperhouse, Sowerby.

Children: several

Haldeworth, Richard de
[1???-1364] Son of John de Haldeworth.

He married Juliana.

Children: John

Haldeworth, Richard de
[1???-1463] Son of John de Haldeworth. He held lands in Hipperholme.

He married Alice.

Children: (1) John; (2) William

Haldeworth, Robert de
[1???-14??] Son of John de Haldeworth.

In 1426, he acquired 16 acres of land in Sowerby from his father.

He married Unknown.

Children: unknown.

In 1473, he surrendered land to his children

Haldeworth, Thomas
[1???-13??] Son of John de Haldeworth.

Recorded in 1361.

He had a son known as John Thomesone de Haldeworth

Haldeworth, William
[14??-14??] Son of Richard de Haldeworth.

He married Johanna, daughter of Richard Waterhouse.

Children: Richard who married Elizabeth.

In his will of 1463, he gave land to

the chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Halifax Church

Haldeworth, William de
[13??-1399] Son of John de Haldeworth

Haldworth, William
[1???-1545] Of Northowram.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) John; (2) Margaret; (3) Isabell who became Mrs Nettleton; (4) Junett who became Mrs Wade.

His will is recorded in Volume 2 [1545-1559] of E. W. Crossley's book Halifax Wills

Haley
[Surname]

There are currently only around 5 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Haley. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Haley, Alfred
[18??-19??] Stock and share broker at Alfred Street East, Halifax.

He lived at Heathfield Place [1905]

Haley, Henry
[1825-1???] Born in Halifax. Bank cashier. He was an official of the Halifax Union Bank.

He was one of the founders of the Halifax Equitable Benefit Building Society [1871], and a director [1872].

He married Unknown who died before him.

Children: (1) Maria [b 1853]; (2) Mary [b 1856]; (3) Clara [b 1858]; (4) Louisa [b 1860].

The family lived at 13 George Street, Halifax

Haley Hill & New Town Allotment Gardeners' Society
Recorded in August 1859, when they held their annual exhibition of flowers, fruit and vegetables in the grounds of Bankfield.

The Haley Hill Sax Horn Band was in attendance.

The gardens of the house were let by Edward Akroyd to his workers, members of Haley Hill Working Men's College, and local residents

Haley Hill Billiard Club, Halifax
19th century billiard club. Some time before 1870, the club issued a penny token [which can be seen at The British Museum]

Haley Hill Choral Society
Recorded in 1829

Haley Hill Cocoa Tavern
Opposite North Bridge Station. A branch of the Halifax Cocoa House Company. Recorded in 1884

Haley Hill Garden Allotment Society
The members were employees of Edward and Henry Akroyd.

Recorded in August 1850, when the annual show was held at Woodside and the Woodside Brass Band enlivened the proceedings

Haley Hill, Halifax
Messuage formerly known as Batt Hill, Halifax. In 1607, Robert Ramsden sold the house to Henry Grime

Haley Hill Literary & Scientific Society
Co-founded by John Hartley in 1861. Many of Hartley's poems were published in the society's magazine, The Circulator

Haley Hill, New Town & Boothtown Horticultural & Floral Society
Established in 1847 by a group of allotment holders associated with the workers at Akroyd's mill

Haley Hill Post Office
Recorded in 1905 at 62 Haley Hill

Haley Hill Sax Horn Band
Recorded in August 1859, when they played at the annual exhibition of the Haley Hill & New Town Allotment Gardeners' Society

Haley Hill Working Men's Club & Penny Bank
Recorded in 1874

Haley, Isaac
[18??-18??] Northowram stone merchant. Partner in John & Isaac Haley.

He married Unknown.

Children: Elizabeth who married John Riley

Haley's: J. & J. Haley
Stone quarrier at Northowram and Sandymere Quarry, Shelf [1896]

Haley's: John & Isaac Haley
Quarry owners and stone merchants at Shelf [1861].

Partners included Isaac Haley

Haley, Rev Joseph
[18??-18??] He trained at Lancashire College and served at Accrington [1856-1863] before becoming Minister at Providence Congregational Church, Stainland [1863].

In 1873, he moved to Lister Hills, Bradford

Haley, R.
[18??-191?] He worked for Mackintosh's.

He died in World War I.

He appears on the list of Mackintosh's employees who served in the Great War

Halez Fax [No 4135] Masonic Lodge
Masonic Lodge.

They were at the Freemasons' Hall, Halifax [1937]. They met on the fourth Wednesday of the month [1937].

Masters and members of the Lodge have included

  • Irvine Hindle – Master [1937]

Half-a-crown Fanny
[18??-19??] A well-known character who lived behind the Park Methodist Chapel in Brighouse

Half-day closing
The idea of closing business for half a day was to compensate the staff for having to work on Saturdays, and came after a long campaign in which drapers played a leading rôle.

See Halifax Early Closing Association, Market Day and Todmorden Tradesmen's Early Closing Association

Half Hole, Soyland

Halford, Ernest A.
[18??-191?] Of Sowerby.

During World War I, he served as a Private.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on the World War I Memorial in Sowerby Church

Halfpenny Can
Area of Southowram just below Southowram Parish Church.

George Peel is recorded here [1823].

See Barker Royd Mill, Southowram, Joseph Brook, Malt Shovel, Southowram and Marshall's

Halfpenny Can, Southowram
Area of Southowram between Saint Anne's in the Grove and Brookfoot Hill.

See Halfpenny Can Lane, Southowram, Titus Lightowler and Malt Shovel, Southowram

Halfpenny Hole Clough, Pecket Well
See Roms Hill, Pecket Well

Halfway House
A local name for Savile Park Lodge

Haliday, Samuel
[16??-1???] Of Northowram.

On 17th May 1678, he married Lydia Hoyl at Coley Church.

Children: (1) Jo [bapt 1679]; (2) Martha [bapt 1681]

Halifax...
Entries beginning Halifax ... and The Halifax ... are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

Halifax
The surname originates in the district.

George Redmonds writes that Henry de Halifax is recorded at Sowerby in 1274

Thomas Waterhouse dropped the name Waterhouse and was known as Thomas Hallifax

Halifax, Baron
[1661-1715] See Charles Montagu

Halifax John
[1195-1256] Another name for Johannes de Sancto Bosco, mathematician and astronomer born in Rastrick

Halifax Road Bridge, Luddendenfoot
Bridge #10 over the Rochdale Canal between Hebden Bridge & Sowerby Bridge

Halifax, Tom
The pen-name of John Lister when he wrote articles for the Halifax Guardian after the death of J. H. Ogden in 1906

The Halig
Crabtree records this as a name for the Hebble.

See Halig-fax and The Helig

Halig-fax
An early name for Halifax.

See The Halig

Haligonian
A native of Halifax.

I suspect that this may be used more frequently in Nova Scotia than in West Yorkshire!

Hall...
The entries for people with the surname Hall are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Hall
[Surname]

There are currently around 56 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hall. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Hall family
Owned Boothtown House.

The family established the Booth Town Charity.

In 1802, they built almshouses and a school in the area

Hall & Clarkson
Woollen cloth manufacturers and merchants at Savile Mill, Halifax [1845]. Partners included Smith Hall and James Clarkson

Hall & Mitchell
Partners included Robert Hall and John Mitchell.

The partnership kept an agent and a stall at Blackwell Hall, London.

Their agents included – John Furness and John Priestley - both of whom were apprenticed to Robert Hall

Hall & Parr
Sowerby manufacturers in the mid-19th century.

See Mitchell's School, Sowerby

Hall End Chocolate Store, Halifax
Waterhouse Street Recorded in 1915 in a newspaper advertisement for Collinson's

Hall End, Halifax

Hall Gate, Mytholmroyd
Owners and tenants have included

Hall-Ing
One of the areas of common land around Halifax Parish Church and the Moot Hall in the 14th century. Others were Blackledge-Ing, Netherfield, Northfield, Southfield and Sydel-Ing.

See Ing

Hall Ing House, Southowram
House off Towngate.

The drive became The Park. The gates are still there but the gates have been moved to the other side of the Lodge

Hall Ings, Southowram
Owners and tenants have included

Hall's: Jeremiah Hall Charity
In his will of 1687, Dr Jeremiah Hall left £20 to be distributed – by his cousins Jonathan, Abraham, and Joseph Hall - to the poor of Boothtown, and another £20 to be distributed to any poor relations in and around Halifax. Using figures for average earnings, £20 in 1687 is roughly the equivalent of £33,500.00 today.

He also left money to establish the Hall Street Almshouses, Boothtown.

See Booth Town Charity

Hall Moor Farm, Soyland

Owners and tenants have included

Hall of Science, Halifax
In 1844, a building with this name was offered to the Halifax Mechanics' Institute. The offer was declined on account of
other plans and schemes which were under consideration

Hall Royd Junction, Todmorden
On the Copy Pit Line near Portsmouth Railway Station. One line goes to Burnley, the other to Manchester

Hall Royd, Todmorden
Or Hallroyd.

Owners and tenants have included

Hall Stones Farm, Todmorden
Upper Lane. House dated 1647

Hall Street Almshouses, Boothtown
In his will of 1687, Dr Jeremiah Hall left £50 to buy land in Boothtown to build accommodation for 2 old men and 2 old women of Boothtown. He also left money for a small school-house.

Cottages in Hall Street, Boothtown, the property of Jonathan Hall, were converted into almshouses and a schoolhouse.

See Brockholes Estate, Ovenden, Jeremiah Hall Charity and Moorfalls Estate, Northowram

Hall Street fairground
19th century market for livestock sales. The market was established here when animal trading had been banned from the centre of Halifax. This was superseded by Victoria Cattle Market in 1885

Hall Street Livery Stables, Halifax

Owners and tenants of the stables have included

Hallas, Charles
[17??-18??] He was a spinner [1845].

On 11th October 1813, he married Ruth Green [1796-1865] at Elland Parish Church.

Children: (1) Martin; (2) John [b 1821] who was a woollen weaver [1841], a weaver hand woollen [1851], a woollen weaver [1861]; (3) David; (4) Thomas [b 1828].

By 1841, Ruth was widowed and a farmer of 2 acres [1851]

The family lived at New Street, Stainland with Old Lindley [1841]; 227 New Street, Stainland [1851]; 456 New Street, Stainland [1861]

Hallas, David
[1810-1865] In census returns and other sources, his name is written Hallas, Hollas and Holas

Born in Sowerby.

He was a worsted weaver [1841]; a worsted power-loom weaver [1851, 1861].

He married Ruth [1822-1???].

Children: (1) daughter who married Mr Morton; (2) Sidney; (3) Sarah [b 1851] who was a woollen weaver [1871]; (4) Thomas [b 1854] who was a linen draper [1871]; (5) Elizabeth [b 1858] who was a weaver woollen [1871]; (6) Gledhill [b 1861].

The family lived at New Street, Stainland with Old Lindley [1871].

Living with them in 1871 was grandson David Morton [aged 13] (farmer's boy) 

Hallas, David
[1821-1865] Son of Charles Hallas.

He was a woollen weaver [1841]; a weaver [1845]; a hand loom woollen weaver, a farmer 8 acres of land [1851]; a woollen weaver [1861].

In 1845, he married Mary Ann Taylor [1820-1898] at Halifax Parish Church.


Mary Ann of Stainland, was the daughter of Joseph Taylor, a paper dealer
 

Children: (1) Harriet [b 1848] who was a burler [1861], a weaver [1871]; (2) Hannah [b 1851]; (3) Benjamin Taylor [b 1855] who was a sorter [1871].

The family lived at 422 Dean, Stainland with Old Lindley [1851]; 442 New Street, Stainland [1861]; Woodhouse Square, Stainland with Old Lindley [1871]

Hallas's: G. Hallas & Company
Accountants and auditors. Recorded in 1881 at Ward's End, Halifax

Hallas, Gledhill
[1861-1923] Son of Martin Hallas.

Born in Halifax [1st January 1861].

He was an accountant [1881]; a stock broker [1891]; a soap maker [1901]; a clerk, political agent [1911]; a tobacconist [1923].

In 1880, he married Sarah Elizabeth Sutcliffe in Halifax.

Children: (1) Sarah Phoebe [1881-1938] who was a pupil teacher [1891] and married [1904] George Clark in Nottingham; (2) Reginald [b 1886] who was a woolstapler's clerk [1891], an engineer [1923].

She lived at 28 Beech Terrace, Halifax [1881]; Oak Terrace, Stainland with Old Lindley [1891]; 11 Hope Hall Terrace, Halifax [1901]; 32 Addison Street, Nottingham [1911]; 27 Milton Street, Nottingham [1923].

Gledhill died at 27 Milton Street, Nottingham [18th April 1923].

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £201. Probate was granted to son Reginald Hallas and daughter Sarah Phoebe Clark.

Sarah Elizabeth died 2 weeks later at 27 Milton Street, Nottingham [6th May 1923].

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £876. Probate was granted to son Reginald Hallas and daughter Sarah Phoebe Clark

Hallas, Henry
[1850-1???] Son of Eli Hallas, silk carder.

Born in Ripponden.

He was a currier [1875]; a journeyman leather currier [1881]; a currier & strap maker [1891]; a leather currier [1901, 1911].

In 1875, he married Mary Emma Atkinson [1847-1???] at Saint Thomas's Church, Huddersfield.


Mary Emma of Taylor Street, Huddersfield was born in Leeds, the daughter of John Atkinson (deceased), cabinet maker
 

Children: (1) Elizabeth Atkinson [b 1876] who was a woollen twister [1891], a worsted spinner [1901], a worsted coating weaver [1911]; (2) Edith E [b 1878] who was a worsted spinner [1891, 1901]; (3) Richard Henry; (4) Alfred W [b 1881] who was an engine cleaner [1901]; (5) Mary W [b 1883] who was a worsted spinner [1901]; (6) John W [b 1886] who was an apprentice printer [1901]; (7) Rosa Moore [b 1888] who was a worsted spinner [1901], a worsted rover [1911]; (8) Alice Mabel [b 1890] who was a machinist [1911]; (9) Dorothy Annie [b 1892].

The family lived at 92 Manchester Road, Huddersfield [1881]; 4 Bank Buildings, Luddendenfoot [1891]; Bank Terrace, Midgley [1901]; East View, New Road, Luddenden [1911, 1915].

Living with them in 1881 was visitor Ellen Shaw [b 1845] (mantle worker).

Living with them in 1911 was great-niece Ivy Atkinson [b 1894] (worsted rover) 

Hallas, Martin
[1812/16-1869] Son of Ruth Green and Charles Hallas.

He was (possibly) born before his parents' marriage.

Between the census of 1841 and his marriage in 1843, he changed his name to Martin Hallas Green.

He was a shoemaker [1841]; a cordwainer [1851].

In 1843, he married Ruth, daughter of Anthony Gledhill.

Children: (1) Eliza [b 1840] who is shown as daughter in 1851, but may be Ruth's sister or illegitimate daughter; (2) Sidney; (3) Edward [b 1847]; (4) Harriet A. [b 1849]; (5) Sarah [b 1851] who was a woollen weaver [1871]; (6) Thomas [b 1854] who was a linen draper [1871]; (7) Elizabeth [b 1858] who was a woollen weaver [1871]; (8) Gledhill [b 1861].

The children all have the surname Hallas Green.

The family lived at 226 New Street, Stainland [1851]; 454 New Street, Stainland [1861]; New Street, Stainland with Old Lindley [1871]

In 1861, David Morton [b 1858] – grandson – was living with the family.

In 1871, David Morley / Morton? [b  1858] – grandson – (farmer's boy) was living with the family.

In 1881, David Hallas [b 1858] – grandson – was living with the family

Hallas, Richard Henry
[1880-1915] Son of Henry Hallas.

He was a woollen operative [1891]; a joiner with Mr Noble in Halifax [1901]; working in Marsden; associated with Luddenden Church & School; a member of the School Pierrot Troupe; a member of the Halifax Light Opera Society.

He emigrated to Canada around 1909.

In Canada, he was working in Toronto; a member of the Mendelssohn Choir.

During World War I, he enlisted and served as a Private with the 20th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He came to England to complete his training. He was sent to France in August 1915.

He died from wounds in the abdomen [24th November 1915].

He was buried at Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France

Hallas's: S. E. Hallas & Son
When The Zelova Soap Company partnership was dissolved in 1901, partner Sarah Elizabeth Hallas carried on the business on her own account as S. E. Hallas & Son

Hallas, Sidney
[1845-1???] Son of Martin Hallas.

He was a woollen weaver [1871].

He went into business with his sister-in-law Sarah Elizabeth Sutcliffe, trading as The Zelova Soap Company

Hallas, Sidney
[1845-1916] Son of David Hallas.

Born in Stainland.

He was a woollen weaver [1871]; a newspaper reporter [1881]; a journalist [1891]; a journalist author [1901]; a journalist [1911].

In 1894, he published The Halifax Mercury at 14 Crossley Street, Halifax.

He went into business with his sister-in-law?, Sarah Elizabeth Hallas, trading as The Zelova Soap Company.

In 1881, Sidney was living at 42 Greenwood Street, Halifax as a boarder with Mrs Mary Bawne [aged 38] (joiner's widow).

In 1885, he married Anne Balmford [1848-1???] in Halifax.


Anne was born in Stainland
 

They had no children.

They lived at Ingwood Terrace, Elland-cum-Greetland [1891]; 36 Cromwell Street, Halifax [1901, 1911].

Living with them in 1901 was visitor Owen G Williams [aged 16]

Hallas, T.
[18??-18??] Merchant at Halifax.

In February 1868, he was declared bankrupt

Hallas's: T. Hallas & Company
Rubber manufacturers at Cinderhill Mills, Todmorden [1911].

On 26th March 1911, a fire at the mill caused £2,000 damage

Hallawell, Edmund
[1798-1872] He was a farmer [1841]; Surveyor of the Highways for Norland, formerly cardmaker [1851]; formerly farmer [1861].

In 1854, he – along with Ely Smith and James Wainhouse – were sued for £43 12/- by William Eagle Bott, a civil engineer, for services rendered to the town of Norland for which Hellawell, as surveyor, and Wainhouse and Ely, as overseers, were liable. They were sent to York Castle, as insolvent debtors, where Ely died [1855]

On 28th March 1822, he married Ruth Bates [1798-1861] from Norland, at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: Elizabeth [1822-1899] who married John Jackson.

The family lived at Stormer Hill, Norland [1841, 1851]; 97 Wood Court, Sowerby Bridge [1861].

Members of the family were buried at Saint George's, Sowerby: Ruth [11th January 1861]; Edmund [20th January 1872]

Hallawell, James William
[1860-1898] Born in Halifax.

He was landlord of the Prince of Wales' Feathers, King Cross, Halifax [1898].

In 1880, he married Elizabeth Hall in Halifax.

After his death, Elizabeth took over at the Prince of Wales's Feathers.

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1898

Hallé, Sir Charles
[1819-1895] Born Karl Halle in Germany, he settled in England and established Hallé Orchestra.

In 1851, he performed at a concert given by the Halifax Philharmonic Society.

On 1st May 1858, he conducted a concert at which Mrs Sunderland sang.

In November 1893, he conducted his orchestra, and played the piano, at a concert given by the Halifax Choral Society at Halifax Drill Hall

Hallewell
A variant of the surname Helliwell

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Hallewell, Arthur G
[18??-191?] He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on All Saints' War Memorial, Dudwell

Hallewell's: B. Hallewell & Company
Makers of roller cloths at Moorfield Works, Halifax [1937]

Hallewell, Charles Frederick
[1874-1949] Born in Halifax.

Corn miller.

In [Q2] 1895, he married Unknown in Todmorden.

Children: Annice Irene [1896-1957] who married Charles Clifford Harrison Portman.

The family lived at #1 Heath Hall, Halifax [1920]

Halliday...
The entries for people with the surname Halliday are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Halliday's
Stone quarrying company at Howcans [1800]

Halliday
The surname originated in Scotland.

It was probably given to someone who was born on Christmas Day, Easter Day or some other holy day or feast day

The Halliday family
The family – possibly a family of cattle drovers – originally came from in and around Dundee, Scotland.

Around 1640, John, Richard, Abraham and George Halliday arrived in the district and started Pule Hill Pottery. Around 1655, they moved to Bateain, Northowram.

In 1775, they established Howcans Pottery.

The family had the tradition of serving their employees a stew for breakfast on Christmas morning.

Significant members of the family included John Halliday and Isaac Halliday.


Question: Please email me if you can resolve some confusion/duplication in the entries for individual members of the Halliday family here

 

See G. & W. Halliday Limited, Titus Kitson and The Churn

Halliday & Company
Proprietors of Bankfield Laundry, Halifax [1905]

Halliday & Midgley
Boot manufacturers at Globe Works, Halifax.

Partners included David Halliday

Halliday & Sons
Wool and fancy dealers at Prince's Arcade, Halifax [1936]

Halliday's: George & William Halliday Limited
Retort, fire-brick and earthenware manufacturers at Howcans.

In 1874, partners included brothers George and William Halliday.

They were at Holmfield Brick Works [1905]. Their offices were at Howcans Brick Works.

On 27th March 1908, there was an Auction Sale for their Brickworks at Boothtown.

See Halliday family

Halliday's: J. A. Halliday
Transport company of Cragg Vale. In January 1929, Walton & Helliwell Limited acquired Halliday's Cragg Vale to Mytholmroyd bus service

Hallifax, Thomas
The name used by Thomas Waterhouse

Halliley, Mr
[17??-18??] Of Dewbury.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Mary [1804-1841] who married Michael Stocks; (2) Elizabeth who married Charles Gleadhall

Hallin Hall Reservoir, Hebden Bridge
Underground reservoir.

Closed in 1988.

In September 2007, planning permission was granted to convert the water treatment works into a 4-bedroom house.

In November 2009, an application [the same?] was approved to convert the derelict pumping station into a 3-bedroom house

Halliwell
A variant of the surname Helliwell

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently only around 9 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Halliwell. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Halliwell, Alexander Bold
[1868-19??] Son of Frederick Henry Halliwell.

Born in Halifax.

He was a painter [1881]; a dentist's assistant [1891].

After his father's death [1889], he carried on his father's dental business at 21 Union Street, Halifax and at Huddersfield.

In 1895, he won gold medals for his work at the Halifax Exhibition

In 1890, he married Mary Jane Wilcock [1868-1???] from Midgley, in Halifax.

Children: Frederick Alfred [b 1904] who was born in Durban, South Africa.

The family lived at 21 Union Street, Halifax [1891], (possibly) in South Africa where their son was born [1901], and 1 West End, Hebden Bridge [1911].

In 1891, Alexander's younger siblings were living with them

Halliwell & Uttley
Joiner, builder and contractor business established in 1864 by William Halliwell and Mr Uttley at Wakefield Road, Brighouse.

In 1873, Uttley died and William Halliwell carried on the business alone

Halliwell, David
[1936-2006] Playwright born in Clifton.

His most famous play was Little Malcolm and his Struggle against the Eunuchs [1965].

In the 1960s, he upset local people when he wrote Steps Back, a play about a man who, returning to Brighouse after 15 years, takes his girl friend on a tour of places from his childhood

Halliwell, Edgar
[18??-191?] Of Sowerby.

During World War I, he served as a Private.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on the World War I Memorial in Sowerby Church

Halliwell, Frederick Henry
[1838-1889] Local dental surgeon.

He introduced Vulcanite to the district. This was

the means of bringing artificial teeth within the reach of the working class

He was succeeded in business by his son, Alexander Bold Halliwell

In 1863, he married (1) Ruth Royle [1842-1871] from Ovenden, in Halifax

Children: (1) Frederick Arthur [b 1864]; (2) Melinda B [b 1866]; (3) Alexander Bold; (4) Josiah Henry [b 1871].

In 1876, he married (2) Matilda Jane Hawken [1855-1???] from Hackney, Middlesex, in Skipton.

Children: (5) Frederick William [b 1878]; (6) Hiram Campbell [b 1879]; (7) Florence E [b 1881].

The family lived at Westgate, Halifax [1871]; 21 Union Street, Halifax [1881]

Halliwell, Joseph
[17??-18??] Card makers at Norland [1809]

Halliwell, Joseph
[1796-18??] Born in Sowerby.

He was a farmer [1841]; a farmer and beerseller [1851]; a beerhouse keeper at the Alma, Cottonstones [1861].

He married Martha [1800-18??] from Sowerby.

Children: (1) John [b 1821] who was a woolcomber [1841], a stone labourer [1851]; (2) Sarah [b 1816] who was a weaver [1841]; (3) Susannah [b 1821] who was a weaver [1841]; (4) William [b 1826] who was a cotton twister [1841]; (5) Betty [b 1827]; (6) Mary [b 1831]; (7) James [b 1840].

The family lived at Otter Lee (next to Parkin Hall), Sowerby [1841]; Hatter Lee (next to Parkin Hall), Sowerby [1851].

Living with them in 1851 were grandson James Hellowell [aged 11] (woollen piecner) and lodger John Clegg [aged 50] (labourer).

Living with them in 1861 was lodger Charles Hollas [aged 56] (stone labourer) 

Halliwell, Sam
[1862-19??] Born in Almondbury.

He was a retired grocer [1911].

Around 1882, he married Amelia [1862-19??] from Ovenden.

They had no children.

The family lived at 2 Trinity Place, Halifax [1911]

Halliwell, William
[1829-1909] Or Helliwell.

He was a joiner [1861]; a carpenter employing 4 men and 2 boys [1871]; a master carpenter employing 2 men and 6 boys [1881]; a joiner and builder [1891, 1901].

After the death of Mr Uttley in 1873, Halliwell carried on the joinery, building and contracting business of Halliwell & Uttley alone at Wakefield Road, Brighouse [1895].

He was honorary Secretary of Park Sunday School, Brighouse.

He worked on many local buildings including the restoration of Brighouse Parish Church, Park Methodist Chapel, and Brighouse Technical School.

He married Sarah Ann from Northowram.

Children: (1) Elizabeth [b 1855]; (2) Eileen [b 1856]; (3) Fanny [b 1858]; (4) Freddie [b 1860]; (5) William Henry [b 1865]; (6) Albert Edward [b 1866]; (7) Mary [b 1870]; (8) Emma Lina [b 1870]; (9) Arthur [b 1873].

The family lived at Lane Head, Brighouse [1861], Belle Vue Cottage, Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse [1871], 3 Lister Street, Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse [1881], 4 Halifax Road, Brighouse [1891], and 4 Lister Street, Brighouse [190, 1911]

Halliwell, William
[1864-1946] In 1932, he replaced Fred Berry as conductor of the Brighouse & Rastrick Band. In 1944, he was replaced by Eric Ball

Hallowell
A variant of the surname Helliwell

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently only around 6 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hallowell. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hallowell, Alma Jane
[1855-19??] Daughter of Joseph Hallowell.

Born in Barkisland.

She was a weaver [1871]; a professor of music [1891]; a professional vocalist [1901].

She never married.

In 1891, her parents were dead and she was head of the household at Ripponden Bank, Barkisland.

Living with her in 1891 were siblings Florence [aged 26] (professional vocalist) and Joe Harry [aged 18] (railway clerk).

In 1901, she was living with sister Florence and her husband William Holroyd.

In 1905, the Sowerby Bridge Chronicle carried an advertisement for Miss Alma Hallowell, singing teacher

Hallowell, Ernest
[18??-191?] Of Sowerby.

During World War I, he served as a Private.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on the World War I Memorial in Sowerby Church

Hallowell, John Herbert
[19??-19??] JP.

He was Mayor of Brighouse [1960-1961]

Hallowell, Joseph
[1828-1888] Son of James Hallowell, tailor.

Born in Soyland.

He was a tailor [1853, 1861, 1871]; a tailor & draper [1881].

In 1853, he married Bathsheba Ward [1831-1889] at Halifax Parish Church.


Bathsheba of Barkisland, was the daughter of William Ward, farmer
 

Children: (1) Alma Jane; (2) Harriet Anna [b 1858] who was a winder [1871], a woollen weaver [1881]; (3) James [b 1860]; (4) Florence Eva [b 1863] who was a silk twister [1881], a professional vocalist [1891], a dress maker [1893], and married William Holroyd; (5) Miriam [b 1866] who was a silk twister [1881]; (6) Elizabeth [b 1868] who was a silk twister [1881]; (7) Mary Ellen [1870-1877]; (8) Joe Harry [b 1873] who was a railway clerk [1891].

The family lived at Ripponden Bank, Barkisland [1861]; Square, Barkisland [1871]; Ripponden Bank, Barkisland [1881, 1891]

Joseph died 1888.

Bathsheba died 1889.

In 1891, Alma Jane was head of the household at Ripponden Bank

Hallowell, Norris L.
[1898-1917] Son of Emma & Edmund Hallowell of 93 Centre Vale Terrace, Triangle.

During World War I, he served as a Lance Corporal with the 26th Battalion Royal Fusiliers.

He died 20th September 1917 (aged 19).

He was buried at the Tyne Cot Memorial [XLIV H 36].

He is remembered on the World War I Memorial in Sowerby Church

Hallowell, Tom
[1???-19??] Of 25 Hollins Street, Triangle. He was a Director of Ripponden Commercial Company [1935, 1949]

Hallroyd Bridge, Todmorden
Railway bridge at Hallroyd Road, Todmorden

Hallsworth
A variant of the surname Holdsworth

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Halmshaw, Anthony
[19??-19??] Player with Halifax RLFC [1971]. He won a cap for Great Britain against New Zealand while at Halifax

Halmshaw, Charles
[18??-1897] He married Catherine [1837-1895].

They lived at Pasture House, Southowram [where Catherine died 1895]; Pasture House, Southowram [where Charles died 1897].

Catherine was buried at Saint Anne's Church, Southowram [17th April 1895]

Halmshaw, Rev Charles
[1833-1920] Or Holmshaw. Vicar of Copley for 43 years [1892, 1905].

He married Eliza [1829-1887].

The couple were buried at Saint Stephen's, Copley with his sister Mary Shone [1831-1899] who died at Copley Vicarage

Halmshaw, William
[1808-18??] Born in Grange Moor.

He was a coal miner [1851, 1861].

He married Sarah [1812-1???] from Whitley.

Children: (1) Martha [b 1832]; (2) Sarah Ann [1834-1898] who married George Beevers; (3) Hannah [b 1838]; (4) Lavinia [b 1840]; (5) Ellen [b 1842]; (6) John [b 1845]; (7) Eliza [b 1847].

The family lived at Brighouse [1851]; Clifton [1861]

Halsall, Rev J. R.
[18??-19??] BA.

Curate at All Souls' Church, Halifax [1907]

Halshaw Clough, Todmorden
Numbers 232, 234, 236 & 238 Bacup Road. Early 19th century cottages

Halstead...
The entries for people with the surname Halstead are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Halstead
[Surname]

There are currently around 49 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Halstead. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Halstead family of Erringden

See Mytholm Hall, Hebden Bridge and The Halstead family of Halifax

The Halstead family of Halifax
In the 16th and 17th century, they were at Northowram and Ovenden.

See Bill Gates, Abraham Halstead, Jonas Halstead and The Halstead family of Erringden

Halstead: Anthony & Halstead
Timber merchants at Todmorden.

Partners included S. Halstead, G. Anthony and W. Halstead.

The partnership was dissolved in September 1867

Halstead's: B. & H. Halstead
Shuttle manufacturers at Halifax.

The partnership was dissolved in July 1872

Halstead's: Bannister Halstead & Company
Shuttle manufacturers at Mayroyd Mill, Hebden Bridge. Established by Bannister Halstead or Bannister Halstead or one of their descendants. Recorded in 1861, 1874 and 1905

Halstead Brothers
Builders, joiners, school furnishers, timber merchants and undertakers. Established by brothers Stephen and William Halstead. They were at Eastwood, Todmorden [1897]

Halstead's: G. H. & J. Halstead
Shoddy manufacturer and waste merchant at Calder Bank Mill, Elland [1905]. Partners included George Henry Halstead

Halstead Green Farm, Heptonstall
Fold Lane / Edge Lane. 17th century house. There is a datestone 1850.

See Spink House, Colden

Halstead's: Handel Halstead & Sons
Shuttle manufacturers at Bridge Street Shuttle Works, Hebden Bridge.

Partners included Handel Halstead, John Halstead, and William Henry Halstead.

The partnership was dissolved in January 1887. The business was carried on under the same name by John and William Henry.

The business was still at Bridge Street [1905]

Halstead's: J., B., and H. Halstead
Brassfounders at Hebden Bridge. Partners included J. Halstead, B. Halstead, and H. Halstead.

The partnership was dissolved in February 1853 as far as regards H. Halstead

Halstead's: James, Bannister & Handel Halstead
Brass founders shuttle manufacturers at Hebden Bridge.

Partners included brothers James Halstead, Bannister Halstead, and Handel Halstead.

The partnership was dissolved in February 1853 as far as regards Handel Halstead

Halstead's: John Halstead & Sons
Nurseryman and landscape gardeners at Holme Nursery, Todmorden [1897]. Established around 1870 by John Halstead.

In January 1880,

J. Halstead, nurseryman and gardener at Todmorden

was listed under

Petitions for Liquidation by Arrangement

Halsworth
A variant of the surname Holdsworth

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Halsworth, Charles
[1850-1???] Born in Shillington, Bedfordshire.

He was a gardener (not domestic) [1881]; a domestic gardener [1891].

In 1873, he married Ann Hare from Arlesey.

Children: (1) William [b 1875]; (2) John; (3) Lizzie [b 1880]; (4) George [b 1881]; (5) Lily [b 1882]; (6) Herbert [b 1884]; (7) Walter [b 1889].

The family lived at 4 Newtown, Northowram [1881]; 7 Iona Street, Northowram [1891]

Halsworth, John
[1877-19??] Son of Charles Halsworth.

Born in Skircoat.

He was a telegraphic messenger [1891].

He and James Buckley were postmen in Halifax and delivered letters on the same round for 40 years. When they retired in 1936, it was claimed that they had walked a total of 200,000 miles. They were each awarded the Imperial Service Medal.

In 1899, he married Mary Sheard [1876-19??] from Halifax, in Halifax.

The family lived at 44 Franklin Street, Halifax [1901] and 9 Lemon Street, Halifax (with Samuel Sheard, Clara's widowed father) [1911]

Hambleton Head Farm, Moor End
Owners and tenants have included

It was known later as Lower Hambleton Hill

Hambleton, Mr
[15??-16??] Preacher at Cross Stone [1617]

Hamelin, 5th Earl
[1130-1202] Aka Count of Anjou, Hamelin de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, Hamelin Plantagenet, Hamelin of Anjou.

He was the illegitimate son of Geoffrey Plantagenet, and half-brother of Henry II.

He married Isabel de Warenne.

Children: (1) William; (2) Isabel.

In 1163, through his wife, he took the titles De Warren and Earl of Surrey and succeeded to the Manor of Wakefield. He granted his inheritance in Sowerbyshire to Jordan, son of Askolf.

He was amongst those who denounced Thomas Becket as a traitor at the Council of Northampton

He built the keep at Conisbrough. He strengthened the motte of Sandal Castle with stone in 1157.

He was buried in the Chapter House at Lewes.

From 1166, the village of Clifton was held by the Earls of Warenne.

See Helias son of Essolf (de Sothill) and Stansfeld

Hamer, Alfred
[18??-19??] DCM.

During World War I, he served as a Sergeant with the 6th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers.

He served at Gallipoli. He was twice commended for gallantry. On 6th May 1915, he led a group of men during an attack on the Gallipoli Peninsula, and was awarded the DCM for conspicuous gallantry

Hamer & Company Limited
Electrical engineers & contractors. They were at Carlton Electrical Works, Halifax [1936]

Hamer Cottage, Blackshawhead
Badger Lane. 3 cottages dated 1770. Now converted into a single dwelling

Hamer, Fred
[18??-191?] He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on Copley War Memorial

Hamer, Henry
[18??-19??] Quarry owner and stone merchant at Pinfold Quarries, Norland [1905]

Hamer, Henry
[1856-1910] Son of Samuel Hamer.

He was a weaver [1871]; a stone merchant [1899, 1901].

After the death of his brother Samuel, Henry took over at the Fleece, Barkisland and ran the pub from 1899 until at least 1908.

On 8th October 1882, he married Martha Sykes [1857-1943] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Herbert [1882-1953] who was a cattleman on farm [1901]; (2) Edith [1884-1926] who was a clerk in tavern [1901].

The family lived at The Fleece, Ripponden Old Bank [1901]

Hamer, J.
[18??-19??] Electric light and power engineer at 3 & 4 Horton Street and 26 Thomas Street, Halifax [1900]

Hamer, Jack
[18??-191?] He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on Copley War Memorial

Hamer, John Edward
[1859-1932] Son of William Hamer, corn miller.

Born in Warley.

He was a corn miller of Skircoat [1879]; a corn miller [1881, 1891, 1901, 1911].

In 1879, he married Emma Jane Heath [1860-1933] at Halifax Parish Church.


Emma Jane of Skircoat, was born in Torpoint, Cornwall, the daughter of William Heath, sailor
 

Children: (1) William [b 1880] who was a corn miller [1901]; (2) Mary Harriet [b 1881] who was a worsted twister [1901]; (3) Heath [b 1883] who was a corn miller [1911]; (4) Joe [b 1886] who was a worsted oiler [1901], a miller [1911]; (5) Nelson [b 1888] who was a worsted doffer [1901], a cart driver [1911]; (6) Edward Harold [b 1890] who was a dyer's labourer [1911]; (7) Jack [b 1897] who was a worsted spinner [1911]; (8) Lewis [b 1900]; (9) Fred [b 1903].

The family lived at Wilsons Buildings, Wakefield Road, Skircoat [1881]; 7 Washer Lane, Skircoat, Halifax [1891]; 89 & 90 Railway Terrace, Halifax [1901]; 30 Copley Hall Terrace, Halifax [1911].

During World War I, sons Heath, Harry and Jack served as Privates with the Durham Light Infantry, and Nelson was a Private with the A.S.C. In August 1915, Heath and Harry were reported to be prisoners of war

Hamer, Joshua
[17??-17??] Of Hamer Hall, Rochdale.

He was a Lieutenant-Colonel.

In 17??, he married Catharine Royds.

Children: Harriet [17??-1857] who married Captain Marcus Worsley

Hamer, Oxley & Company
Woollen manufacturers at Clay House Mills, Greetland [1905]

Hamer, Samuel
[1811-1875] He was innkeeper & farmer of 12 acres [1871]; landlord of the Fleece, Barkisland [1860-1875].

On 20th December 1839, he married Nancy Jackson [1820-1892] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Richard [1841-1918]; (2) Sarah [1843-1932]; (3) Elizabeth [1845-1932]; (4) Ellen [1848-1914] who was a cotton reeler [1871]; (5) Alfred [1851-1934]; (6) Samuel; (7) Henry.

Samuel died 4th May 1875.

Probate records show that he left effects valued at under £100 to Nancy.

After his death, Nancy took over at the Fleece until her death.

Nancy died 23rd September 1892.

Probate records show that she left effects valued at £133 10/3d to son Samuel.

They are mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1892.

After (or shortly before) her death, son Samuel took over and ran the pub until his death in 1899

Hamer, Samuel
[1852-1899] Son of Samuel Hamer.

He was a weaver [1871]; a farm labourer [1891].

In 1892, after the deaths of his parents, Samuel took over at the Fleece, Barkisland and ran the pub until his death.

He died 4th December 1899.

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £1,832 12/5d to his brother Henry.

After his death, his brother Henry took over at the Fleece and ran the pub from 1899 until at least 1908

Hamer, Samuel Henry
[1860-1930] Born in Horsforth.

An engineer and owner of an iron works in Range Lane, Halifax which was established in 1888. The factory specialised in making lathe-chucks. He was a tool maker (employer) [1911].

He was a member of Harrison Road Congregational Church.

He was the instigator – and one of the founder members – of the Halifax Antiquarian Society. A preliminary meeting of the Society was held at his home on 12th November 1900.

He was a trustee of the Mary Farrar Trust.

In 1913, he was one of the subscribers to The Old Halls & Manor Houses of Yorkshire.

He was a numismatist and had a large collection of tokens. He wrote many articles about tokens for the Halifax Antiquarian Society

On 12th June 1886, he married Vina Jowett [1858-19??] from Halifax. Children: (1) child who died young [before 1911]; (2) Maria [b 1888] who was a milliner [1911]; (3) Phyllis [b 1895] who was a tailoress [1911].

The family lived at Bleak House, Boothtown [1911].

The Hamerton family of Elland
The name is frequently spelled Hammerton. The family lived at Hamerton House, Elland.

Dr John Hamerton was an early member of the family

The Hamerton family of Langfield
They were lords of the manor and controlled Langfield. In the early 16th century, the manor was, by attainder of Sir Stephen Hamerton, forfeited to the Crown

Hamerton, Emma
[1824-1898] Daughter of John Hamerton and sister of Lucy. Baptised 1825.

Both sisters were superintendents and taught at Sunday School in Elland for over 50 years. The girls' Sunday School was in Grace Ramsden's School. Later, she had charge of the choir at Elland Parish Church.

He was buried at Elland Parish Church

Hamerton, Ernest
[1835-1873] MRCS, LSA.

Son of Dr John Hamerton.

Born in Elland.

In September 1859, he was admitted as a Licentiate at Apothecaries' Hall. He was in practice with his father in Elland [1861].

Around 1860, he built Hamerton House, Elland.

On 7th December 1859, he married Helen, daughter of William Scholefield, in Elland. Helen was the sister of Mary Elizabeth who married Ernest's brother Joseph.

Children: (1) Mary Elizabeth [b 1860]; (2) Constance Helen [1862-1867]; (3) John [1863-1867]; (4) Margaret [1865-1867]; (5) Gertrude [1867-1868]; (6) Katherine [b 1869]; (7) Ernest Collingwood [1872-1873].

They lived at Calder Cottage, Elland-cum-Greetland [1861]; 77 Westgate, Elland-cum-Greetland [1871].

Living with them in 1871 were boarders James Richardson and Herbert G. Hicks.

Members of the family were buried at Elland Parish Church

Hamerton House, Elland
Westgate. Built by Dr Ernest Hamerton [around 1860].

His sisters, Lucy and Emma, went to live at the house.

See Hamerton Close, Elland

Hamerton, John
[17??-17??] Of Peel House, Warley.

He married Unknown.

Children: John

Hamerton, John
[17??-18??] Son of John Hamerton. Of Fold, Shibden and Staups, Shibden.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) John; (2) Northend Nicholl

Hamerton, Dr John
[1794-1876] Son of John Hamerton.

Born in Halifax.

He was the first member of the Hamerton family of Elland.

Physician and Surgeon.

He was educated at Stockport Grammar School, and then at Guy's and Saint Thomas's Hospital, London.

He moved to Elland in 1815.

He was on the committee of the Huddersfield & Liverpool Direct Railway Company [1845].

He was a retired surgeon [1871].

In 1821, he married Mary [17??-1875], daughter of Joseph Rushforth.

Children: (1) Martha [b 1823]; (2) Lucy; (3) Emma; (4) John; (5) Charles [b 1829]; (6) Samuel; (7) Ernest; (8) Joseph.

The family lived at The Cross, next to Elland Parsonage; West House, Elland [1830, 1871].

He tended to the injured in a train accident at North Dean Station in 1865

Hamerton, John
[1827-1852] Eldest son of Dr John Hamerton.

Baptised 1827.

He was in London studying to be a doctor when he died of epilepsy just before taking his exams for the College of Surgeons

Hamerton, Joseph
[1756-1840] Hamerton Yard, Brighouse is named for him

Hamerton, Joseph
[18??-1881] Youngest son of Dr John Hamerton.

On 1st December 1859, he married Mary Elizabeth, daughter of William Scholefield, in Elland.

Mary Elizabeth was the sister of Helen who married Joseph's brother Ernest.

They lived at Spring Field, Shibden.

He went to America. He died at Saint Elmo, Alabama

Hamerton, L.
[1???-18??] Architect who designed Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse

Hamerton, Lucy
[1824-1915] Daughter of John Hamerton of the Hamerton family of Elland. Baptised 1824.

She and her sister, Emma, lived at Hamerton House which had been built by their uncle Ernest Hamerton.

She was a church-goer and a significant public figure. Both sisters were superintendents and taught at Sunday School in Elland for over 50 years. The girls' Sunday School was in Grace Ramsden's School.

Her history entitled Olde Eland – which was written to raise funds for Canon Winter's appeal to build All Saints' Church – gives a picture of 19th-century life in Elland.

She died 7th May 1915.

She was buried at Elland Parish Church

Hamerton, Northend Nicholl
[1???-1833] Of Castle House, Rastrick.

Son of John Hamerton.

On 6th June 1833, he was shooting rabbits in Fixby Park when

he was charging his gun when it went off

fatally wounding him. His brother John was called to attend him, but he died 3 hours later at Fixby Hall

Hamerton, Philip Gilbert
[1834-1894] Writer, artist, and art critic. Born near Oldham, Lancashire. He produced an unsuccessful volume of poems, then did some landscape painting.

He was editor of the Local Portfolio.

In 1856, he came to live in Halifax. He camped at Widdop and studied the rocks and heather, and wrote about his experiences in The Painter's Camp.

In 1858, he rented the Scottish island of Innistrynych, and settled there with his French wife, before moving to France.

He wrote and edited many books, essays and articles, including

  • The Painter's Camp in the Highlands [1863] – an autobiography

  • Etching and Etchers – the standard work on the subject

He died suddenly in Paris

Hamerton, Rev Samuel Collingwood
[1833-1872] Son of Dr John Hamerton.

Baptised 1833.

He died in the Isle of Wight

Hamerton, Sir Stephen
[14??-1537?] Owned the Manor of Langfield He took part in the Pilgrimage of Grace and was executed. The Manor passed to the crown, but his family held property in the district

Hamilton, Charles B.
[18??-19??] Established Charles B. Hamilton & Company. In 1936, both he and the company are listed at 13 Prescott Street Halifax

Hamilton's: Charles B. Hamilton & Company
House furnishers and upholsterers selling floor coverings and bedding established by Charles B. Hamilton.

They were at 71 Northgate, Halifax, 42a Pellon Lane, Halifax [1912], and 13 Prescott Street Halifax [1936]

Hamilton, Mrs Emily
[18??-1???] Professor of music at 86 King Cross Street, Halifax [1887]

Hamilton, Rev H. A. Douglas

Hamilton, J.
[18??-19??] LSEP.

Electric and botanic practitioner at 24 Hopwood Lane, Halifax [1906]

Hamilton's: J. Hamilton & Son
Wire workers at 27 Waterhouse Street, Halifax [1905]

Hamilton, Rev J. Miller
[18??-19??] Minister at Pellon Lane Baptist Church [1907]. In 1912, he moved to Crossgates, Leeds

Hammer & Pincers Hall, Elland

Hammerstone Leach, Elland
Broad Carr Terrace / Hammerstone Leach Lane. Recorded in the 1850s

Hammerton
See Hamerton

Hammerton, Gervase Disney
[1843-1913] 6th son of Holden Hammerton.

Born in Burnley/Halifax.

In 1854, he and the family emigrated to New Zealand, aboard the Cashmere.

In New Zealand, he became a lawyer. He entered the office of Arthur Standish in New Plymouth. The partnership became Standish & Hammerton [recorded in 1869].

In 1875, he was agent for the Imperial Fire Insurance Company.

In 1881, he went to live in Patea.

He was active in public affairs; chairman of the Patea Domain Board; solicitor to the Borough Council and various other local bodies in the district; president of the local Horticultural Society; vestryman & choirmaster at Saint George's Church, Patea.

He took part in the New Zealand Land Wars and was a bugler in No 2 Company, Taranaki Rifles; Mounted Constable, No 3 Div Armed Constabulary, (February 1868-1st December 1868, discharged through illness) and 1877-1881; Taranaki Bush Rangers (1868-1871); 2nd lieutenant in No 7 Company, Taranaki Militia.

His war medal was issued 24th December 1873 and a duplicate medal issued in 1897.

On 19th April 1873, he married Mary Madeira, daughter of Francis Ullathorne Gledhill, at Patea.

Children: (1) Frank; (2) Lawrence; (3) Reginald; (4) Eustace; (5) daughter E.; (6) daughter M.; (7) daughter who married Mr Graham.

He died at Patea [13th July 1913]

Hammerton, Holden
[1???-1861] Eldest son of Gilbert Hammerton of Burnley. Brother of Thomas Edward Hammerton.

He lived at Hollins Hall, Lancashire.

He became a Halifax solicitor.

He practised with his father-in-law, Lewis Alexander, and his brother-in-law, Edward Nelson Alexander.

On 2nd September 1826, he married Eliza, daughter of Lewis Alexander.

Children: (1) T. E.; (2) L. A.; (3) child; (4) child; (5) child; (6) Gervase Disney; (7) child; (8) child

The family lived at Hopwood Hall.

In 1854, the family emigrated to New Zealand, aboard the Cashmere, and lived in Taranaki.

He died in Nelson, New Zealand [27th February 1861]

Hammerton, John
[17??-1???] He was Constable of Northowram [1771]

Hammerton, Lewis A.
[18??-19??] Son of Holden Hammerton.

He emigrated to New Plymouth, New Zealand

Hammerton, T. E.
[18??-19??] Son of Holden Hammerton.

He emigrated to New Plymouth, New Zealand, arriving from Auckland on the SS Wonga Wonga [11th October 1862].

In March 1865, he married Sarah Ann Parris


Sarah Ann was the daughter of Robert Parris, Assistant Native Secretary
 

Hammerton, Thomas
[1788-1872] Son of Rev William Hammerton.

Born in Hipperholme.

He was a GP [1861].

He married Unknown.

In 1861, he was widowed and living with his nephew Thomas William Cowell at 112 Piccadilly, London

Hammerton, Thomas Edward
[1796-1875] Son of Gilbert Hamerton of Burnley. Brother of Holden Hammerton.

Solicitor at North Street, Todmorden. He was one of a number of attorneys who were

commissioned for taking acknowledgements of deeds executed by married women

and was a Commissioner for administering oaths in chancery.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Anne who was the first wife of Charles Gould KC [1862]; (2) other daughters.

The family lived at West Lodge, Todmorden [where he died 25th August 1875]

Hammerton, Rev William
[1763-1834] He was a schoolmaster; a clerk; Curate & Incumbent of Saint James's Church, Tong [for a total of 39 years].

On 23rd March 1788, he married (1) Agnes Forrest [17??-1795] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Thomas; (2) Agnes [1790-1867] who married Rev Joseph Cowell; (3) Elizabeth Forrest [1791-1820]; (4) Mary [1792-1793]; (5) Maria who died in infancy [8th March 1793]; (6) William who died in infancy [10th June 1795].

The infants were buried at Coley Church

Agnes was buried at Coley Church [13th December 1795].

On 27th December 1796, he married (2) Ann Harrop [1759-1839] at Saint Oswald's Church, Guiseley.

Children: (7) Wilson [1798-1799]; (8) William [1800-1879]; (9) John Harrop [1803-1871].

The family lived at Hipperholme [1796].

William and Ann were buried at Saint James's Church, Tong: William [22nd September 1834]; Ann [29th March 1839]

Hammond, Eliza
[1843-1913] Born in Snaith.

She was a servant to Nathan Whiteley and family, James Allen Whiteley, and Benjamin Whiteley at Smithy Clough, Ripponden (from around 1871 until her death).

Probate records show that she left effects valued at £240 15/5d. Probate was granted to Thomas Lund (warehouseman) and Jane Hammond (widow) 

Hammond, Emma Louisa
[1867-1946] Born in Bradford. Daughter of Ezra Waugh Hammond, a gentleman brewer of Horton Hall Bradford of the Hammond Brewing Family.

She married William Henry Aykroyd

Hammond, George
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the South Wales Borderers.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hammond, Rev L. C.
[18??-19??] In 1903, he was appointed Minister at Vale Baptist Church, Todmorden

Hammond, Turner & Bate
Cotton manufacturers at Turvin Mill, Cragg Vale [1874] and braid manufacturers [1893]

Hammond, William
[1???-1???] Police Constable in Roomfield Lane, Langfield [1857]

Hamnet, Arthur
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the West Riding Regiment.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hamnett, Bernard
[1921-1940] Son of Florence and Arthur Hamnett of Todmorden.

During World War II, he served as a Private with the 1st Battalion Border Regiment.

He died 31st May 1940 (aged 19).

He was buried at the Tournai Communal Cemetery Allied Extension [VI B 3].

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hampson, James Ledger
[1???-1???] Of Uppermill, Saddleworth. In 1911, Samuel Dugdale, Edwin Meadowcroft and he were the first directors when Meadowcroft, Hampson & Company Limited of Vic Mill, Saddleworth was incorporated.

Hampson's: L. J. Hampson & Company
Halifax engineers. Recorded in 1905 at John Street / Waterhouse Street

Hampson, Mrs M.
[1???-19??] Recorded in 1936, when she had an arts and crafts studio at Palace Chambers, Halifax

Hamshaw, Daniel
[1866-1951] Born in Clifton.

He was grocer with a shop at the junction of Cross Street and Bradford Road [1909] – the premises are now [2008] a sandwich shop; a labourer in iron foundry [1911].

In [Q1] 1894, he married Eliza Aspinall [1870-19??] from Kirkheaton, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Edith Hannah [b 1895] who was a milliner [1911]; (2) Herbert [b 1896] who was a cabinet maker [1911].

The family lived at Cross Street, Brighouse [1909]; 2 Cross Street, Brighouse [1911].

Eliza (possibly) died in Grimsby [1937].

Daniel died in Cleethorpes [1951]

Han Royd, Midgley Moor
There are several Bronze Age earth circles lying north east of Upper Han Royd on Midgley Moor:

  • A cairn [400m to the north east]

  • A ring cairn [360m]

  • A cairn with an oval bank [430m]

See Lower Han Royd and Upper Han Royd

Hancock, Rev William Edward
[18??-1???] Vicar of Saint James's Church, Halifax [1881]

Hand Carr Clough, Luddendenfoot
Stream which flows past Hand Carr Farm, Luddendenfoot.

It powered Hand Carr Mill

Hand Carr Farm, Luddendenfoot
Hand Carr Lane

There is a datestone E.S.S. 1640 probably for Edward Sutcliffe.

Originally Hand Carr Mill, Luddendenfoot.

The property is now 2 dwellings.

See Hand Carr Clough, Luddendenfoot

Hand, Cynthia
[19??-] Local writer and member of Halifax Authors' Circle

Handley, Rev Dennis Francis
[19??-] Vicar of Ripponden with Rishworth and Barkisland with West Scammonden [1997-2006].

In 2006, he left to become Rector of Almondbury with Farnley Tyas

Handley, Rev J.
[18??-18??] Minister at Cross Lanes United Methodist Chapel, Hebden Bridge [1850]

Handley, Dr Joseph
[1822-1874] Of Water Street, Todmorden.

He married Unknown.

Children: Joseph Edwards.

He died on 6th November 1874, after drinking a quantity of carbolic acid in mistake for beer

Handley, Joseph Edwards
[1848-1913] Son of Dr Joseph Handley.

He was known as Dr Handley. He was assistant to his father, and although he never took any technical qualifications, he carried on a medical and surgical practice for many years after his father's death.

He had a breakdown in health and passed his practice on to his assistant, Dr George Philip Elliott.

He was a member of Todmorden Town Council [1901]; President of Todmorden Liberal Council; President of Sowerby Division Liberal Association; Vice-president of Todmorden Liberal Club; a Director of the Todmorden Joint Stock Mill Company; a playing member of Todmorden Cricket Club

Handyside, John Robertson
[18??-18??] Bookseller at Todmorden.

In March 1862, he was declared bankrupt

Hanging Field Farm urnfield, Todmorden
Enclosed Bronze Age urnfield lying north west of Hanging Field Farm

Hanging Hey, Shibden
A coal pit is mentioned here in 1749 when it was described as being
about 70 yards deep

and situated

on the south side of Shibden Hall

It gained the coal from the Upper Bed. Most of the pits on the Shibden Hall estate were less than 50 yards deep

Hanging Lee, Sowerby
In 1728, John Royds bought the property

Hanging Royd Farm, Northowram
Shibden Head.

Owners and tenants have included

Hanging Shaw, Todmorden

Owners and tenants have included

See Higher Hanging Shaw, Todmorden and Lower Hanging Shaw, Todmorden

Hanging Stones Farm, Ripponden
Hanging Stones Lane

Hangingroyd Farm, Hebden Bridge
Recorded in the 1850s. It was demolished in 1???

Hangingroyd, Hebden Bridge
Area of Hebden Bridge. The name is recorded as Hynganroyde [1571], Hingingroyde [1634], and Hanging Royd [1665].

The name uses the element Royd and means a clearing on a steep slope

Hangingroyd House, Hebden Bridge
House at Hangingroyd. Built in 1???.

Owners and tenants have included

Demolished in 19??. Hangingroyd Close stands on the site

Hangingroyd House, Shibden
House at Hangingroyd. William of Hangingroyd is mentioned in 1307, and Adam of the Hingandrode in 1311. In 1376, Richard of Heton bought the estate. The property then passed to the Longbotham / Longbottom family. The Longbottoms owned it in the 15th century

Hangingroyd, Shibden
Area of the Shibden valley mentioned in the 14th century

Hangingshaw
Todmorden

Hangram Field, Brighouse
Owned by the Drake family of Ashday [1700s]. Saint Paul's Methodist Chapel was built on this area at the junction of King Street and Police Street. When the church was demolished, the site became a wire-works. This was demolished and the Brighouse Co-operative Society car park now occupies the site

Hanley, John
[15??-16??] Curate at Heptonstall [1586]

Hanley, Joseph
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the West Riding Regiment.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hannah, F. E.
[18??-19??] Headmaster at Brighouse National School. He was organist at Saint James's Church, Brighouse

Hannam, Mr
[18??-1???] (Possibly) father or brother of Hannan Hannam, David Hannam Thornton's mother. He owned race-horses. He was a partner in Thornton, Hannam & Marshall

Hannard, Barrad
[1839-1???] Born in Ireland. He was a beer seller at the Red Lion, Halifax [1871].

He married Briget [1839-1???], also from Ireland.

Children: (1) John [b 1861]; (2) Margaret [b 1865]

Hanover Housing Association Flats, Pye Nest
The white-faced flats are a landmark on the road to Sowerby Bridge

Hanscombe, Rev D. G.
[19??-19??] Vicar of Saint Andrew's Church, Holmfield [1966]

Hanson...
The entries for people with the surname Hanson are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Hanson
One source of the surname was in 1377, when John de Rastrick, son of Hans or Henry de Rastrick, changed his name and is recorded as John Hanson.

It has been suggested that he did this do avoid confusion with his grandfather, John de Rastrick.

There are currently around 99 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hanson. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Hanson family
Important family in Woodhouse, Rastrick.

John, son of Hans or Henry de Rastrick, was the first member of the family. He changed his name and, in 1377, he is recorded as John Hanson. It has been suggested that he did this in order to avoid confusion with his grandfather, John de Rastrick.

See Brighouse river crossing, Parkland Textiles, Rastrick Hall and Hanson family arms

The Hanson family: Arms
The arms of the Hanson family includes a martlet with a shield representing Hanson, Rastrick, Woodhouse and Toothill

Hanson & Anderton
Quarry owners at Hedge Top Quarry, Northowram [1905]

Hanson & Bailey
Woollen cloth manufacturers at Elland.

Partners included I. Hanson and W. Bailey.

The partnership was dissolved in September 1861

Hanson & Balme
Mineral water manufacturers established in 1874 by Charles Young Hanson and Herbert Balme.

They were at Birdcage Works, Halifax [1905].

A 1900 advertisement for the business publicised their

Famous Hop Bitters

sealed with a tin capsule

Hanson & Priestley
Stay makers at Halifax.

Partners included A. Hanson and J. Priestley.

The partnership was dissolved in October 1822

Hanson & Son
Halifax business selling furniture, carpets and wallpaper at premises in South Place. Founded in 1846 by the grandfather of Thomas William Hanson. In 1910, when the shop closed and the area was cleared for the construction of the Arcade Royale, they moved to new premises in King Edward Street. T. W. Hanson and his brother, Arthur, inherited the business when their grandfather died. After Arthur's death, Thomas carried on the business until he sold it in 1938

Hanson Brothers & Keighley
Established in 1861. Partners were William and Samuel Hanson and J. W. Keighley. They had business at Commercial Mill, Halifax [1866]. They moved to Livingstone Mill, Queens Road [1874]

Hanson's: Charles Hanson & Sons
Soap manufacturers of Brighouse. Established by Charles Hanson

Hanson's: David Hanson & Company
Oil cloth and tarpaulin manufacturer at Holywell Green [1874]

Hanson House, Brighouse

Hanson Lane bomb
This was the major incident in Halifax during World War II.

Around 9:00 pm on Friday, 22nd November 1940, a 100 kg (220 lbs)  bomb was dropped and fell at the junction with Crossley Terrace.

It killed 11 people – including

Another 10 people required hospital treatment.

The bomb damaged the West Hill pub and 537 houses, about 30 of which had to be demolished.

It has been suggested that the single bomb was actually dropped by an allied aircraft.

See Norman Cornwell and Emmeline Jagger

Hanson Lane Economic Stores
69 Hanson Lane. The first branch of Economic Stores (Halifax) Limited. Opened in 19??. A butcher's department was added around 1924

Hanson Lane Football Ground, Halifax
Stood opposite Thrum Hall. The first football match was played at the grounds on 7th October 1876. It was used 1876-1886. It was succeeded by Thrum Hall.

It was later occupied by Halifax Corporation Water Works.

See James Dodd

Hanson Lane gaol
A purpose-built debtors' prison built in 1840 to replace the jail at Dungeon Street. The building had two storeys, an exercise yard and a chapel, and could accommodate 697 debtors, each of whom spent an average of 16 weeks in the building.

The gaol closed in 1868.

In October 1868, the West Riding Sessions resolved to purchase the Debtor's Prison and appropriate it for use as a Militia depot for the Sixth West Yorkshire Regiment. The amount expended on this was about £6,000.

From Monday, 19th October 1868 all debtors within the West Riding who were committed to gaol, were sent to the Castle at York.

Those incarcerated here included

Hanson Lane Post Office
Recorded in 1874 at 46 Hanson Lane, Halifax when William B. Woodrow, printer and stationer, was postmaster

Hanson Lane Reservoirs
2 mid-19th century reservoirs. They were situated at the south-east corner of the junction of Hanson Lane and Queens Road. Built for Halifax Corporation. They had a capacity of 6,000,000 gallons.

In 1855, the eastern reservoir was abandoned for the construction of the Victoria Cattle Market

Hanson's: Luther Hanson & Charles
Electrical engineers at North Bridge Electrical Works, Halifax.

They filed patents for

improvements in electric arc lamps, field-magnets, and in dynamo electric machines and motors

In 1888, the patent rights were acquired by the formation of Luther Hanson & Company

Hanson's: Luther Hanson & Company (Limited)
The Company was formed in 1888 to acquire the patent rights to
improvements in electric arc lamps, field-magnets, and in dynamo electric machines and motors

of Luther Hanson & Charles.

The subscribers to the new company were

Hanson Shears
Bottlers of West Vale

Hanson's: William Hanson & Company Limited
Cotton spinners and doublers and warp manufacturers established as a private company in 1861 by the Hanson Brothers & Keighley and Esau Hanson. Their headquarters were at Commercial Mills, Halifax [1874].

In 1886, after the death of Esau Hanson, Mr Walsh, a sleeping partner, joined the company.

In 1889, it became a limited company – William Hanson & Company Limited – with William Hanson as Managing Directory. They then occupied Haley Hill Mills, Beech Hill Mills [which was the new head office], Box Tree Mills, Wheatley, Jumples Mills, Wheatley, and Victoria Mills, Brighouse.

In the 1880s, the firm was known as Esau Hanson.

In 1890, they employed over 500 workers, and operated 80,000 doubling and spinning spindles.

In the late 1960s, the business was taken over by John Atkinson & Sons of Sowerby Bridge.

In November 1971, the mill – and its 120 ft tall chimney – was demolished to make way for redevelopment

Ha'penny Bridge, Brighouse
Bridge across the Calder to enable horses to cross from the canal to the river.

The name originates in the halfpenny toll = ½d = which pedestrians were charged to cross the bridge.

It was swept away by a flood in September 1946

The Ha'porth
Newspaper first published on 7th April 1892. On 13th September 1892, it was incorporated with the Halifax Opinion. On 3rd January 1893, it became the Halifax Comet

Happy Union
See Rev Oliver Heywood

Harbord, Mary
[17??-1???] She was the first wife of Sir George Armytage

Harcourt, John A.
[1???-19??] During World War II, he served with the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Harcourt, Johnson
[18??-19??] Comedian from Todmorden.

He lived at Pickthall Terrace, Millwood [1905]

Hard Hippings Bridge, Hebden Bridge
Carries Carr Lane over the Calder to join Burnley Road alongside Canal Wharf Saw Mills

Hardaker, Dennis
[18??-19??] JP.

He was Mayor of Brighouse [1920-1922]

Hardaker, I. A.
[18??-19??] (Possibly) photographer at Rochdale Road, Todmorden


Question: Can anyone tell me anything about the man? Was he related to William Hardaker?

 

Hardaker, James
[18??-19??] Partner in Holdsworth & Hardaker

Hardaker, William
[1824-1904] Todmorden artist.

Some of his work – 6 paintings and a self-portrait – was exhibited at the Centre Vale Museum, Todmorden. When the museum closed in 1947, the museum wrote to interested parties asking if they wanted the items to be returned to them.


Question: Does anyone know where the paintings are today?

 

He had an historical exhibition named for him.

He was buried at Saint Paul's Church, Cross Stone

Hardcastle
The surname may originate in Hardcastle Crags, meaning either impregnable stronghold or herdsman's home

There are currently only around 9 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hardcastle. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hardcastle, Barratt & Gelder
Boot manufacturers at Brighouse, Batley and Barnsley.

Partners included G. Hardcastle, E. Barrat and E. Gelder.

The partnership was dissolved in November 1869

Hardcastle Chalet
Hardcastle Crags. Recorded in 1905, when John Greenwood was proprietor

Hardcastle Crags
Beauty spot with woods and the rocky crags lying along Hebden Water below Heptonstall. The area was popularised as a leisure area in Edwardian times.

The surname Hardcastle may have originated here.

See Ackroyd Brothers, Clarion Movement, Cosy Corner Guest House & Café, Hebden Bridge, Fisherman's Hut Falls, Hebden Bridge, Walter Greaves, Hardcastle Crags Murder, Hardcastle Crags Railway, Hawden Hall Holiday Camp, Hebden Bridge Sculpture Trail, Samuel Heywood, William Holt, Horseshoe Cascade, Hardcastle Crags, Lord Holme Restaurant, Mitchell's Pavilion, Stepping Stones, Hardcastle Crags, Dent Sutcliffe, Sutcliffe's Refreshment Rooms & Dance Saloon, Thornton's Tea Rooms, John Tillotson, Tom Bell's Cave, Walshaw Bridge, Hardcastle Crags, Walshaw Falls, Hardcastle Crags and Widdop Gate Hostel, Heptonstall

Hardcastle Crags Murder
On Friday, 7th February 1817, Samuel Sutcliffe was murdered and robbed by Michael Pickles and John Greenwood at Hawden Hole, Hardcastle Crags

See Mill, Murder & Railway

Hardcastle Crags Preservation Committee
Formed in 1934 to protest against proposals to build a reservoir at Hardcastle Crags. It re-appeared to make similar protests in 1948 and 1967

Hardcastle Crags Railway
A small steam railway about 6 miles long which ran along the west side of Hardcastle Crags. It was started around 1901 carrying stone from Hell Hole Quarry for the construction of three reservoirs at Walshaw Dean, and ran up the Walshaw valley and Blake Dean, where stone supports for the trestle bridge can still be seen. For the carriages, Enoch Tempest bought 15 old horse trams from Liverpool. The workers converted these into open trucks. There were several small engines – known as Paddy Mails because of the number of Irish workers.

The railway closed in 1912 when work on the reservoirs was completed.

See Dawson City and Mill, Murder & Railway

Hardcastle Crags Reservoir
In the 1930s, there were proposals to create a reservoir at Hardcastle Crags.

  • On 27th March 1934, Halifax Corporation revealed a proposal for a new reservoir in Hardcastle Crags. There was a protest meeting in Hebden Bridge

  • The proposal was opposed by many local people – including Phyllis Bentley, Lady Fisher-Smith, and Sir Harold Mackintosh

  • On 18th April 1934, Todmorden and Wadsworth councils protest at the proposal

  • On 1st August 1934, Halifax Waterworks Committee abandoned the plan

  • On 21st September 1934, it was announced that 14,000 people had signed a petition against the proposal

The proposal was revived in 1948, but was rejected by the House of Lords.

It was revived by Calderdale Water Board in 1965, only to be opposed by the Hardcastle Crags Preservation Committee.

In 1969, a House of Lords Select Committee approved a plan for a reservoir, but in 1970 this was overturned in the House of Commons

Hardcastle, Frederick
[1791-1867] Of Rhodes Street, Halifax.

He was a clerk, then a cashier, then Manager with the Halifax Commercial Bank.

He was (possibly) Chapel Warden at Northgate End Chapel [1833-1841].

He retired from the management in 1855, and was presented with a piece of plate, a gold snuff-box, and a purse containing a sum of money.

He was Treasurer of the Board of Guardians of the Halifax Union.

He died 12th July 1867.

See Partners in Halifax Commercial Banking Company

Hardcastle, Henry Arnold
[1891-1916] Son of Wright Hardcastle.

During World War I, he served as an Air Mechanic 2nd Class with the (No 3 Training Centre) Royal Flying Corps

He died 1st April 1916 (aged 25).

He was buried at All Saints' Church, Dudwell and he is remembered on All Saints' War Memorial, Dudwell

Hardcastle, Herman
[1889-1917] Son of James Hardcastle of 27 Kimberley Street, Brighouse.

He was a carpet sizer at Firth's Carpets in Bailiff Bridge.

On 13 August 1912, he married Florence Hilda Littlewood at Hipperholme,

They lived at 10 Albert Square, Waterloo Road, Brighouse [1916]; 10 Daisy Street, Briggate, Brighouse; 14 Old Lane, Brighouse.

During World War I, he attested at Halifax [December 1916] and served as a Private with the 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He went to France [14th January 1917].

He died 9th April 1917 (aged 28).

He is remembered on the Arras Memorial [Bay 6], Firth's War Memorial and the Bailiff Bridge War Memorial.

His widow was granted a pension of 13/9d a week [5th September 1917].

After his death, Florence Hilda married Mr Crossley

Hardcastle, John
[1726-1800] Of Halifax. He was a sheriff's officer and keeper of the gaol in Halifax

Hardcastle, Joseph Scott
[1837-1880] Son of William Hardcastle.

He was landlord of the Blue Bell, Halifax [1869]; landlord of the Ring O' Bells, Halifax [1874].

In 1860, he married Naomi Watson.

Children: (1) child who died in infancy; (2) child who died in infancy; (3) child who died in infancy; (4) child who died in infancy; (5) William Richard [b 1861]; (6) Joseph [b 1868]; (7) James Scott [b 1870]

Hardcastle, Shaw
[18??-1941] Halifax draper and founder of Shaw Hardcastle Limited.

He died 2nd April 1941

Hardcastle, William
[1???-18??] A tenant at Roydlands, Southowram in the time of Anne Lister

Hardcastle, William
[1789-1865] He was a cordwainer; a town councillor [1858-1864]; landlord of the Ring O' Bells, Halifax for almost 20 years [1845, 1850]; a bell-ringer at Halifax Parish Church.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) sons; (2) Joseph Scott

Hardcastle, Wright
[18??-19??] Umbrella manufacturer at Crown Umbrella Works, Halifax.

In [Q3] 1874, he married Hannah Barrett in Halifax.

Children: Henry Arnold.

The family lived at 13 North Parade [1905].

Wright was dead by 1917

Harden Grange, Bingley

Hardgrave
A variant of the surname Hargreaves

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Hardgraves
A variant of the surname Hargreaves

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Hardibutts Farm, Hebden Bridge
Used for Methodist meetings in the late 18th century

Hardie, Canon Archibald George
[19??-19??] Vicar of Halifax [1962]

Hardie, Keir
[1856-1915] He was the first MP for the Independent Labour Party.

On 16th December 1904, he addressed a Labour Party meeting in the Mechanics' Hall, Halifax.

On 2nd September 1913, he visited Halifax to mark the coming of age of the Halifax Independent Labour Party.

See Nimrod Howarth

Harding, Rev A. J.
[18??-19??] Minister at Birchcliffe Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge [1906]

Harding, Rev Arthur Clement
[18??-19??] Vicar of Christ Church, Barkisland [1917]

Harding, Harry George
[1871-19??] Son of William Harding.

Born in Somerset.

He was a hostler at the Three Nuns Inn, Mirfield [1891]; a hotel keeper [1898]; licensed victualler at the Bath Street Tavern, Halifax [1901, 1905]; a gardener [1911].

In 1898, he married Mary Janet Allan [1863-1???] at Battyeford, Mirfield.


Mary Janet, of Bailiff Bridge, was the daughter of engineer John Allan
 

Children: Cyril [b 1900].

The family lived at Bath Parade Tavern, 12 & 13 Bath Parade, Halifax [1901]; Coppin Hall Lane, Mirfield, Dewsbury [1911]

Harding, Mike
[1944-] Born in Manchester.

He is known as a folk singer; comedian; photographer; songwriter; author; broadcaster.

In the 1960s, he appeared at the Grass Roots folk music club at the Plummet Line, Halifax. More recently he has appeared at the Hebden Bridge Trades Club.

He has lived at Mill Bank

Harding, Mrs
[1???-18??] In 1840, she ran a school in Brighouse

Harding, Rev Wilfred John
[1886-1917] MA, MC.

Son of Alice Emily [née Tucker] and Richmond Arthur Harding, of Isleworth, Middlesex.

Born in Battersea, London [2nd December 1885].

He was educated at Saint Paul's School, Hammersmith; Christ's College Cambridge; Curate at Luddenden [1912-1914].

On 11th May 1917, he married Mary Riley at Saint Thomas's Church, Saint Anne's-on-Sea.


Mary was the daughter of the late Robert Thomas Riley of Luddenden
 

They had no children.

He enlisted with the Royal Army Medical Corps [17th October 1914].

He was killed in action at Passchendaele while stretcher-bearing during heavy fighting [31st October 1917]

Hardman
[Surname]

There are currently only around 9 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hardman. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hardman's: A. Hardman & Son Limited
Cotton spinners at Branxholme Mills, Bailiff Bridge established by Adam Hardman.

There was a serious fire at their mills on 7th September 1910

Hardman, Adam
[18??-19??] Established A. Hardman & Son Limited at Bailiff Bridge

Hardman, Dr James
[1787-1873] Younger son of Robert Hardman. Born at Dobroyd, Todmorden.

He was a surgeon in Todmorden. He was certifying surgeon for factories at Todmorden, until 1873, when he was succeeded by Dr C. W. Thorp.

He took the Gauxholme estates – including Gauxholme Mill – away from his older brother, Robert, paid off his debts, and allowed him a pension for the rest of his life.

He married Unknown.

Children: Betsy who married James Howarth.

See Richard William Foster, Gauxholme Cotton Mill, Goldthorpe vs Hardman and Mr Holgate

Hardman, John
[1???-18??] Birmingham artist who produced much of the stained glass at All Souls', Haley Hill. His east window depicts scenes from the life of Christ: the nativity, the miracles, the crucifixion, the resurrection and the ascension. His west window depicts the last judgement. He also did work at Saint Stephen's, Copley

Hardman, John
[17??-1???] Built Smithy Holme Mill, Walsden in 1794

Hardman, John Cockroft
[1864-1913] Son of Walton Hardman.

Born in Hebden Bridge [23rd June 1864].

He was licensee of the Hole in the Wall, Hebden Bridge [1898]; a publican in Bradford; licensee of the Wheatsheaf, Halifax; landlord of the King's Head, Halifax [1911]; landlord of the Bull's Head, Sowerby Bridge [1913].

In [Q3] 1890, he married Rhoda May Oliver [1863-19??] from Lincolnshire, in Todmorden.

Children: (1) Harold [1892-1975]; (2) Mabel [1894-1896] who died aged 2 years; (3) Redvers Walton [1899-1900] who died aged 11 months.

John died at the Bull's Head, Sowerby Bridge [14th August 1913].

Rhoda died in Cape Town, South Africa [1956] (aged 97) 

Hardman, Lawrence
[1719-1772] Son of Robert Hardman

Born in Walsden.

He was Constable at Todmorden & Walsden [1749].

He married (1) Mary Bamford.

He married (2) Ellen Dewhirst

Hardman, Robert
[1738-1823] Of Butcher Hill, Walsden. Son of Judith [1711-1795].

He owned much land and property in Todmorden, including The Black Bull Inn, Gauxholme [17??], Gauxholme Corn Mill, Walsden, and The Hare & Hounds, Gauxholme.

He married Betty Lord [1750-1832].

Children: (1) Nancy [1777] who died in infancy; (2) Nancy [1780-1784]; (3) John [1780-1805]; (4) Mary; (5) Robert; (6) Hannah; (7) James

Members of the family were buried at Saint Mary's Church, Todmorden

Hardman, Robert
[1785-1861] Son of Robert Hardman.

He married Mary [1809-1842]

He inherited his father's land and property.

He was a Captain in the local militia. This occupied much of his time and his wealth began to disappear. The situation was resolved by his younger brother, James, who took over the Gauxholme estates, paid off the debts, and allowed Robert a pension for the rest of his life

Mary was buried at Saint Mary's Church, Todmorden.

See Gauxholme Cotton Mill

Hardman, Walton
[1839-1890] Born in Todmorden.

He married Mary Ellen Lord [1842-1888].

Children: (1) John Cockroft; (2) Robert Lord [1870-1943]; (3) Elizabeth who died aged 2

Hardwick, Rev Edward Farrar
[1832-1903] Son of Mary Ann and William Hardwick.

He was a Wesleyan minister

Hardwick, Forest of
Known as The Forest of Sowerbyshire, until the 16th century. An area from Todmorden to Salterhebble, roughly equivalent to the Parish of Halifax.

See Gibbet Law and Running Man

Hardwick, John William
[1826-1891] Son of Mary Ann and William Hardwick.

In 1852, he emigrated to New South Wales, Australia

Hardy
[Surname]

There are currently around 20 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hardy. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hardy, Alfred
[1855-1938] Born in Brighouse.

He was a stone merchant [1881].

In [Q3] 1881, he married Fanny Shaw [1860-1948] in Halifax.


Fanny was born in Liversedge
 

Children: Shaw.

The family lived at Prospect House, Upper Lane, Brighouse [1911]

Hardy Brink, Hebden Bridge
A part of King's Farm

Hardy, Charles
[1854-1937] Son of John Hardy.

Born in Sowerby.

He was a woollen spinner [1871]; a labourer (woollen mill) [1881]; a mechanic labourer [1901].

On 11th July 1885, he married (1) Mary Ann Smith [1858-1905] from Sowerby, at Elland Parish Church.

Children: Willie [1893-1976].

The family lived at Belmont, Sowerby [1901].

Living with them in 1901 was Charles's widowed mother Betty.

Mary died 1905.

In [Q1] 1909, he married (2) Harriet Mann [1851-1938] in Halifax.

Charles, Harriet & son Willie died in Southport

Hardy, Charles Wilmot
[18??-18??] BA.

Educated at Trinity College Cambridge. He was Usher at Heath Grammar School [1844]. He lived at 1 Carlton Street [1845]

Hardy, Elizabeth
[18??-18??] In 1845, she ran a school in Brighouse

Hardy, Henry
[1854-1904] Landlord of the Cock & Bottle, Southowram [1891, 1904].

He married Sarah Ann.

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1904.

Sarah took over at the Cock & Bottle [1905]

Hardy, Herbert
[1???-19??] JP.

He was Mayor of Todmorden [1956-1957]

Hardy, Joe
[18??-19??] Of 22 Greenup's Terrace, Sowerby Bridge.

He was injured – a split artery on his face – in the Pye Nest Tram Disaster of 15th October 1907, but was treated at home

Hardy, John
[18??-19??] Clockmaker and jeweller at 22 Old Cock Yard, Halifax.

He lived at 2 Glen Terrace, Clover Hill Road [1905]

Hardy, John
[1824-1894] Son of William Hardy.

Born in Sowerby.

He was a cloth dresser [1841]; a carpenter [1851]; a joiner [1861]; a mechanic [1870]; landlord of the Alma, Cottonstones [1870-1886]; a joiner & beerhouse keeper [1871]; a carpenter & beerhouse keeper [1881]; a carpenter [1891].

On 5th June 1851, he married Betty Helliwell [1828-1913] at Halifax Parish Church.


Betty, from Sowerby, was the daughter of farmer Joseph Helliwell
 

Children: (1) Ann [1852-1929] who married James Culpan 1849-1920; (2) Charles; (3) James Helliwell [1856-1860]; (4) Jonas [b 1858] who was a woollen spinner [1871], a railway engine cleaner [1881]; (5) Fred [b 1861] who was a bricklayer's labourer [1881]; (6) Mary Elizabeth [1863-1883]; (7) Joe [b 1865]; (8) Ellen [b 1867].

The family lived at Rawsons Farm, 4 Saw Hill, Sowerby [1861]; 3 Boggard Lane, Norland [1891]

Living with them in 1881 was lodger Ellen Sutcliffe [aged 24] (silk operative) 

John, Betty and children Mary Elizabeth & James Helliwell were buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones

Hardy, John
[19??-] Born in Halifax.

Educated at Parkinson Lane Community Primary School.

He has been Chairman of Halifax Town Football Club; a newsagent on Union Street, Halifax [1965-1988]; Conservative Councillor for Warley Ward [1988]; Conservative Councillor for Skircoat Ward [2012]; Mayor of Calderdale [2012-2013]

Hardy, Jonas
[1???-18??] Around 1842, he was a bobbin-maker at Elland

Hardy, Joseph
[1822-1873] Son of butcher John Hardy.

Born in Leeds.

He was a stuff singer of Halifax [1853]; beerseller at the Black Dog, 34 King Street, Halifax [1861]; publican at the Black Dog, 25 King Street, Halifax [1861].

In 1853, he married Hannah Swaine [1829-1???] at Halifax Parish Church.


Hannah, of Halifax, was the daughter of joiner & cabinet maker Benjamin Swaine
 

Children: (1) Henry [b 1854] who was a gun maker [1871], a dyehouse labourer [1881]; (2) Elizabeth [b 1857] who was a factory hand [1871], a worsted spinner [1881]; (3) Julia [b 1859] who was a sewing machinist [1881].

After Joseph's death, Hannah married William Chadwick

Hardy, Raymond
[18??-191?] He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on Copley War Memorial

Hardy, Raymond
[1891-1914] Son of William Hardy

He worked at Greetland Dyeworks.

He was a member of Skircoat Green United Methodist Free Chapel.

He enlisted in 1910.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 2nd Battalion, Durham Light Infantry.

He was killed in action in France, 2 days after his 23rd birthday [21st September 1914].

He is remembered on the La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial and on All Saints' War Memorial, Dudwell

Hardy, Richard
[1???-1545] Of Warley.

He married Margaret.

Children: William.

His will is recorded in Volume 2 [1545-1559] of E. W. Crossley's book Halifax Wills

Hardy, Rev Ronald A.
[1903-1956] He was Minister at Blackley Baptist Church [1928-1944] and Minister at Highroad Well Congregational Church [1947-1956].

In 1947, he married Emily Dearden in Haslingden.

They lived at 39 Court Lane, Halifax [1956].

In 1956, the couple were knocked down by a car, driven by Clement Halliday (draper) of 53 Mayfield Avenue, Halifax. They were taken to Halifax Infirmary for treatment. Rev Hardy died 4 hours later

Hardy, Shaw
[1893-1918] Son of Alfred Hardy.

Born at Iona Terrace, Hove Edge [5th October 1893]

He was a stone delver [1911].

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 1st/6th Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He was killed in action [11th April 1918].

He is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial [Panel 82-85 & 162A]

Hardy, Rev Thomas
[18??-18??] He married Ann [1806-1866].

Ann died 27th April 1866 [aged 60].

She was buried at Bolton Brow Wesleyan Chapel.

Buried in the same grave is Anne Eliza [1827-1895], the 4th daughter of Wesleyan Minister Rev Charles Janion. She was born at Saint Martin, West Indies and died in Halifax [19th January 1895]

Hardy, William
[1???-1???] Born in Sowerby.

He was a carpenter [1841, 1851].

He married Mary [1791-18??] from Sowerby.

Children: (1) William [b 1816] who was a wool sorter [1841], a wool comber [1851]; (2) Jonas [b 1819]; (3) John; (4) Mary [b 1827] who was a silk drawer [1851]; (5) George [b 1833] who was a silk boiler [1851].

The family lived at Triangle, Sowerby [1841, 1851].

Living with them in 1851 was grandson Frederick Hardy [aged 3]

Hardy, William
[1850-1???] Son of Joseph Hardy, labourer.

Born in Norland.

He was a fuller of Norland [1873, 1878]; a cloth fuller [1881, 1891, 1901, 1911].

In 1873, he married (1) Mary Jane Habergham at Elland Parish Church.


Mary Jane was the daughter of
William Habergham
 

Children: Emily J [b 1875] who was a worsted winder [1891].

Mary died 1877 (aged 26).

In 1878, he married (2) Hannah Sutcliffe [1857-1902] at Elland Parish Church.


Hannah was the daughter of John Sutcliffe, labourer
 

Children: (2) Kezia [b 1879] who was a worsted spinner [1891], a worsted twister [1901]; (3) Rachel [b 1882]; (4) Fenella [1888-1891]; (5) Clement [b 1890] who was a cloth fuller [1911]; (6) Raymond.

Hannah died [Q1] 1902 (aged 44).

In 1903, he married Sarah Jane [1863-19??] at Halifax Parish Church.


Sarah Jane, of Railway Terrace, Skircoat was born in Greetland, the daughter of Luke Fox (deceased), labourer, and widow of Mr Fletcher.

She had 2 children by her first marriage: (1) Rodha [b 1891] who was a worsted twister [1911]; (2) Agnes [b 1895] who was a worsted twister [1911].

Children: Eric [b 1904].

 

The family lived at 21 Pickwood Scar, Norland [1881]; 5 Pickwood Scar, Norland [1891]; Pickwood Scarr, Norland [1901]; 2 Wood Terrace, Salterhebble, Halifax [1911]; 503 Wood Terrace, Salterhebble, Halifax [1914]

Hare & Hounds Inn No 1 &Pound;25 Money Club
Halifax Friendly Society [Number 4219] recorded in 1898, when their registration was cancelled (under the Friendly Societies Act [1896]) 

Hare Hill, Todmorden
Owners and tenants have included

Hare, John
[13??-14??] Son of Robert Hare.

See Northowram Hall

Hare, Robert
[13??-13??] He lived at Northowram – possibly on the site of Northowram Hall. Between 1351 and 1373, he leased a part of Shibden Mill.

He married Unknown.

Children: John

Hare Spinning Company Limited
Established on 18th January 1907 to construct Hare Mill, Todmorden.

Those involved in the company included Lancastrian businessmen Jonathan Milne, Abraham Henthorn Stott [Senior] and Abraham Henthorn Stott [Junior].

There were claims of fraud and the company was wound up in 1914. Hare Mill was sold.

See Jonathan Gledhill and Frederick Hague Moss

Harehill Street Co-operative Society, Todmorden
The Harehill Street branch of the Todmorden Co-operative Society opened on 25th May 1905 – the 15th new branch

Harella: L. Harris (Harella) Limited
Later Croftmyl Manufacturing Company Limited, Harella International Fashions.

Clothing and underclothing manufacturers established in London by Lew Harris on his return from the USA in 1919.

The company had factories in London and Birkenhead, and came to Halifax in the 1930s, with factories at Croftmyl in West Parade and at Brunswick House [1950s].

In 1963, the company was taken over by the Selincourt Group, and in 197? by the Barnsley-based S. R. Gent & Company Limited.

The factory finally closed in 1979.

The Croftmyl building was later occupied by the Halifax Chamber of Commerce

Harewood Well
Aka Harwood Well. Earlier form of Highroad Well

Harford, Rev B.
[18??-18??] Of Todmorden. Recorded in December 1853, when he attended a Poor Law meeting at Manchester

Harger, George
[1???-1762] Blacksmith of Southowram.

On 18th March 1762, he was hanged at the Tyburn, York, for the murder of John Moore, Bailiff of Halifax.

A pamphlet was published entitled the Last Speech and Dying words of George Harger

Harger, John
[1792-1859] Born in Halifax.

He was a saddler and harness maker.

On 25th December 1823, he married Mary Carver [1803-1868]. at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Sarah Hannah [bapt 1825] who married Joseph Moxon Kirk; (2) Eliza [bapt 1827-1838]; (3) John Henry [bapt 1831]; (4) Thomas Carver [bapt 1836]; (5) Caroline Amelia [bapt 1841-1928] who died unmarried in Bournemouth.

There are memorial clerestory windows for the couple in Halifax Parish Church erected by their daughters [1879]

Hargrave
A variant of the surname Hargreaves

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently only around 7 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hargrave. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Hargrave family of Warley
There were branches of the family at Wakefield.

The family is discussed in the book Yorkshire Pedigrees

Hargrave, Lawrence
[14??-15??] Of Warley and Wakefield. Son of Nicholas Hargrave.

He married Unknown.

Children: Robert.

His will was proved on 14th July 1543

Hargrave, Nicholas
[14??-1531] Yeoman of Warley and Wakefield.

He married Agnes.

Children: (1) Richard; (2) Elizabeth; (3) John of Sowerby [will proved 1579]; (4) Lawrence

Hargrave, Richard
[1???-155?] Of Sowerby. Son of Nicholas Hargrave.

He married Unknown.

Children: Richard

Hargrave, Richard
[15??-158?] Of Sowerby. Son of Richard Hargrave.

He married Unknown.

Children: Richard.

His will was proved on 30th October 1583

Hargrave, Richard
[15??-1636] Son of Richard Hargrave.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Robert; (2) Richard [bapt 1616]; (3) Christopher [bapt 1618]; (4) Thomas [bapt 1620]; (5) Sara [bapt 1622].

He was buried at Wakefield

Hargrave, Robert
[15??-1579] Of Warley and Wakefield. Son of Lawrence Hargrave.

In 1541, he sold his land in Warley to George Holdsworth and went to live in Wakefield.

He married Elizabeth Haldeworth, daughter of John Holdsworth.

Children: (1) Jennet who married Oliver Addey; (2) Isabell who married William Watts; (3) Agnes who married John Burton from Wakefield; (4) Margaret who married William Roberts; (5) Elizabeth who married (1) John Mytchell from Colne and (2) Marmaduke Hodgeson from Skipton; (6) John of Wakefield.

He was buried at Wakefield

Hargrave, Robert
[1614-1?6?] Of Lightcliffe. Son of Richard Hargrave

Hargraves
A variant of the surname Hargreaves

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Hargreave
A variant of the surname Hargreaves

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Hargreaves
Other forms of the surname include Hardgrave, Hardgraves, Hargrave, Hargraves and Hargreave.

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

George Redmonds writes that the name originated in the Burnley area

There are currently around 28 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hargreaves. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hargreaves, Albert
[1888-1915] Son of William Hargreaves.

He was a cotton piecer [1891, 1901]; a cotton twiner [1911]; a constable in the West Riding Police force at Castleford [1911-1914].

During World War I, he joined the Army shortly after the outbreak of War, and served as a Lance Corporal with the 4th Battalion, Grenadier Guards.

He went to the Front in August 1915.

He died from wounds received in France [12th October 1915] (aged 27).

He was buried at Sailly-Labourse Communal Cemetery, France [L 3].

His death was reported on 1st November 1915

Hargreaves, Alfred Reginald
[1903-1955] Aka Reg. He and Lou Orton ran several laundries and dry-cleaning businesses in the area – including the Snow White Laundry, Todmorden and Harton Cleaners, Hipperholme.

He married Ethel Pickles.

Children: (1) Robert; (2) Roger; (3) Elizabeth; (4) Richard

Hargreaves, Bottomley & Jagger
Fancy woollen manufacturers at Rastrick.

Partners included James Hargreaves, William Bottomley and Thomas Jagger.

The partnership was dissolved in December 1851

Hargreaves, Charles Roger
[1935-1988] Aka Roger Hargreaves. Son of Reg Hargreaves. Born in Cleckheaton [9th May 1935].

He and his siblings – including Robert – were brought up at Hazelhurst, Sowerby Bridge.

He went to Goole Primary School [1940] and Sowerby Bridge Grammar School [1947]. After leaving school, he served in the RAF. He went into advertising and worked for Greenly's in Bradford before going to London working as a copy writer.

In 1960, he married Margaret Christine Heard from Dorset.

Children: (1) Adam [b 1964]; (2) Giles [b 1966]; (3) Amelia & Sophia [b 1970].

In the 1970s, he created the Mister Men series. Mr Tickle was the first character which was created when he asked his son, Adam

What does a tickle look like?

The publication of Mr Tickle, Mr Bump, Mr Greedy, Mr Happy, Mr Nosey and Mr Sneeze launched the series in August 1971. In 1981, he created the Little Miss characters.

He died on 11th September 1988. At that time, 85,000,000 books had been sold in 15 languages in 22 countries.

In 2004, the Hargreaves family sold their interest in the Mister Men and Little Miss characters for £28 million

Hargreaves, Dorothy
[16??-1???] Daughter of John Hargreaves. She assisted her father in his legal work.

She married Henry Hoppey

Hargreaves's: E. Hargreaves & Company
Water Lane, Halifax. Aka Hargreaves Foundry. Iron founders established by Ebenezer Hargreaves in 18??.

See Joseph Nicholl

Hargreaves, Ebenezer
[18??-19??] Luddenden millwright. He worked with W. Warburton. The 2 men left to go into business on their own. He established E. Hargreaves & Company

Hargreaves, Edwin
[1814-1869] Of Brighouse.

He married Patience [1813-1888].

The couple were buried at Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse

Hargreaves Foundry Limited

Hargreaves, Harold
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the Welsh Regiment.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hargreaves Head, Shelf
Brighouse & Denholmegate Road. House dated SBM 1693. The house was rebuilt about 1740.

Owners and tenants have included

Hargreaves, Henry
[15??-16??] Of Cliffe Hill, Hipperholme.

He married Grace.

His will was recorded on 24th November 1657 and Grace was executor

Hargreaves, Henry
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the Lancashire Fusiliers.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hargreaves, James
[16??-17??] A Halifax clothier.

In 1716, he married Mary, daughter of Jeremy Brigg

Hargreaves, James
[18??-18??] Cotton manufacturer at Wood Bottom Mill, Walsden.

In June 1863, he was declared bankrupt

Hargreaves, Jim C.
[1???-19??] During World War II, he served with the Royal Air Force.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hargreaves, John
[1628-1701] Son of Jonathan Hargreaves.

He was a clerk to Edward Hanson.

He practised as a scrivener in Rastrick [1650-1656] and in Halifax [1660-1701].

He was Coroner [1662-1701].

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) John; (2) Elizabeth who married Mr Bairstow; (3) Grace who married Richard Newton; (4) Dorothy; (5) Ann [d 1663]; (6) Judith [d 1664]

Hargreaves, John
[1653-1700] Son of John Hargreaves.

In 1679, he married Susan, daughter of John Murgatroyd.

Children: (1) Susannah; (2) Alice who married Jonathan Maude.

He was recorded as being

very fat

and died at the age of 46

Hargreaves, John
[1809-1888] Of Brighouse

Hargreaves, John
[1867-19??] Born in Halifax

On 7th April 1890, he married Annie Elizabeth Hollas in Halifax.


Annie Elizabeth was the daughter of
John Hollas
 

Children: (1) John [b Halifax 1894]; (2) Sydney [b Reddish 1899]; (3) Ernest Harold [b Reddish 1903]

Hargreaves, John A.
[19??-] Born in Burnley. He now lives in Halifax. He is a popular local historian, writer and teacher. He is a member and officer of the Halifax Antiquarian Society.

His published works include

  • Sowerby Bridge in Old Photographs [1994]

  • Halifax [1999]

Hargreaves, Jonathan
[1???-16??] Of Skircoat.

He married Unknown.

Children: John

Hargreaves's: L. & T. Hargreaves
Cotton manufacturers at Todmorden.

Partners included L. Hargreaves and T. Hargreaves.

The partnership was dissolved in August 1881

Hargreaves, Lewis
[1879-1936] Born in Halifax.

He was a foreman dyer [1918].

On 7th December 1918, he married Ethel in Halifax.


Ethel was the daughter of
William Henry Magson and widow of Alfred Swan
 

Hargreaves, Lloyd
[1???-1???] In 1868, he and Mr Thomas established business as pattern maker at Gaol Lane, Halifax.

In 1874, Hargreaves became sole proprietor.

In 1888, the business moved to Central Pattern Works, Halifax.

The business is recorded in 1905

Hargreaves, Richard
[1842-1896] He worked for Ormerod Taylor & Son Limited at Walsden.

He was Master at the Todmorden Lodge of Harmony.

He was buried at Christ Church, Todmorden

Hargreaves, Robert
[1???-1???] Of Hipperholme.

He was a trustee of Birkhead's Charity

Hargreaves, Rev Robert
[16??-17??] BA.

Curate at Todmorden [1742]

See Norland Upper Hall

Hargreaves, Robert
[1824-1902] In 1856, he married Lucy Hannah Manby [1825-1904] in Skipton.

They lived at Norland Hall [1904]

Hargreaves, Robert
[1933-2010] Eldest son of Reg Hargreaves. Born in Cleckheaton.

He and his siblings – including Roger – were brought up at Hazelhurst, Sowerby Bridge. He was educated at Eastbourne College.

He started work as a Junior Reporter for the Halifax Courier in 1950. He joined the RAF, and was a Pilot Officer based in Prince Edward Island. He went to work for the Manchester Telegraph before moving to London.

In 1962, he joined the editorial team of News at Ten, and worked as Head of Special Projects and Washington correspondent.

He returned to England due to illness.

He subsequently wrote Superpower, and American history & the First Freedom: a history of the freedom of speech. He retired and went to live near Rye

Hargreaves, Thomas
[1812-1???] Woolstapler at Halifax.

In 1855, he married Anna Maria Lancashire [b 1816] from Holywell.

They lived at 7 Park Road, Halifax [1881]

Hargreaves, William
[18??-18??] In 1866, he began making shuttles at Gauxholme Mill, Walsden

Hargreaves, William
[1860-19??] Son of Abraham Hargreaves, farm labourer.

Born in Rastrick.

He was a cotton doubler of Rastrick [1882]; a cotton doubler [1891]; manager in cotton mill [1901, 1911].

In 1882, he married (1) Emma Haigh [1862-1897] at Saint Matthew's Church, Rastrick.


Emma was born in Rastrick, the daughter of Humphrey Haigh, commercial traveller.

She was a worsted weaver [1891]

 

Children: (1) Sarah Jane [b 1883] who was a cotton reeler [1901]; (2) Albert; (3) Ida May [b 1893] who was a cotton winder [1911].

Emma died 1897 (aged 35).

In 1898, William married (2) widow Ellen Hoyle [1856-1908] in Halifax.


Ellen had a daughter Edith Hoyle [b 1881] who was a school teacher [1901]
 

Ellen died 1908 (aged 52).

In 1909, William married (3) Mary Ann Williamson [1866-19??] in Rochdale.


Mary Ann was born in Rochdale
 

The family lived at Brighouse Fields, Rastrick [1891]; 27 Penn Street, Sowerby Bridge [1901]; 13 Egremont Street, Sowerby Bridge [1911]

Hargreves, Mr
[16??-17??] Curate at Elland [1733]

Harker, George Frederick
[18??-19??] Of 10 Wakefield Road, Sowerby Bridge.

In 1904, he was one of the first people to be granted a motor cycle registration and a motor cycle drivers' licence

Harker, Raymond
[1???-19??] During World War II, he served with the Duke of Wellington's Regiment.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Harker, Willie
[1872-1960] Born in Halifax.

He was a brass worker [1900].

On 16th April 1900, he married Sarah Ellen Hollas in Halifax.


Sarah Ellen was the daughter of
John Hollas
 

Children: (1) George [1900-1973]; (2) Mabel [1903-1985]

Harkis, George
[18??-18??] Excise officer and earthenware dealer at Church Lane, Brighouse [1845].

He married Unknown.

Children: John who was also an excise officer

Harley Bank, Todmorden
Area of Todmorden

Harley, Harold
[1860-1937] Rastrick-born actor and playwright who worked under the name of Mark Ambient.

He was the eldest son of the Rev Robert Harley, minister of Bridge End Congregational Church.

He wrote A little ray of sunshine which opened on Broadway on 28th August 1899 where it ran for 22 performances.

He is best-known for his book The Arcadians which was turned into a popular musical. The production opened in 1909 at the Shaftesbury Theatre, London, and on Broadway in 1910.

He died in a Brighton nursing home

Harley Head Farm, Hove Edge
Halifax Road / Spout House Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

The offices of Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse council were here [1839-1887].

See Spout House, Hove Edge

Harley House Cottage, Todmorden
Victoria Road. Early 19th century property. Harley House is attached

Harley House, Todmorden
Victoria Road. Early 19th century property. Harley House Cottage is attached.

Owners and tenants have included

See Harley House Mill, Todmorden

Harley, Rev Robert
[1828-1910] FRAS, FRS, MA.

Son of Robert Harley, a Scottish Methodist minister.

Born at Seacombe, near Liverpool.

He was a well-known mathematician who carried out research into higher algebra, notably quintics. Horsfall Turner's Halifax Books & Authors lists many of his papers, articles and other publications.

At the age of 16, he was mathematics master at a school at Seacombe, Lancashire. Shortly afterwards, he was head assistant at his old school in Blackburn. Around 1840, he became a divinity student at Airedale College, Bradford.

He was Minister of Bridge End Congregational Church [August 1854-1868]. He preached with William Booth at Brighouse.

Around 1864, he was mathematics and logic tutor at Airedale College. He was principal of Huddersfield College [1882-1885]. In 1863, he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society on account of his work in mathematics. He edited the mathematics articles in the New English Dictionary.

He lived at Castle Hill, Rastrick. In May 1863, he went to live at the new minister's house, Newlands, Huddersfield Road.

On 17th November 1854, he married Sara Stroyan [1820-1905] from Burnley.

Children: (1) Harold; (2) Arthur who married [1896] Kate Watkinson; (3) daughter; (4) daughter.

In 1868, he moved to Leicester and then to Mill Hill, London.

He was Minister at Heath Congregational Church, Halifax [1892-1895].

He died at Forest Hill, London after being taken ill on holiday.


Question: Is there any link between Harley Street, Rastrick, Harley Place, Rastrick and the Rev Robert Harley?

 

Harley Wood Library, Todmorden
Established when Crosslee Library and Toadcarr Library merged.

After operating successfully for several years, there were theological squabbles and the library closed

Harley Wood, Todmorden
Area of Todmorden

Harley Wood, Todmorden
Early 19th century laithe-house

Harling, Frank
[1???-194?] Of Todmorden.

During World War II, he served with the Royal Navy.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Harman, Mr
[1???-1???] A chemist. He was a partner in Harnett & Company, the Halifax camera and photographic equipment company

Harmony Masonic Lodge, Halifax
Masonic Lodge established at the Angel, Halifax [1789].

In 1794, the Lodge moved to the Bacchus, Halifax, establishing the Bacchus Lodge.

They later moved to Huddersfield

Harmony [No 288] Masonic Lodge
Masonic Lodge at Todmorden.

Recorded in 1912, when the membership was 49

Harness, Sarah
[18??-18??] She ran a school in Halifax [around 1850]

Harnett & Company
Halifax company which sold cameras and photographic equipment. The company was established in 1???. The original proprietors were Mr HARman, a chemist, and Mr NETTleton – hence the name Harnett.

They had premises at North Bridge.

They also had premises in the small row just below the Playhouse in King Cross Street – having moved there from further up the street when the flyover was constructed in the late 1960s/1970s.

When the shop closed in 200?, the 2 proprietors were father and son.

See Leonard J. Birch

Harold Savage Memorial Hall, Elland
Aka Savage Centre. In March 1931, Harold Savage offered to build a hall to celebrate the completion of his service as Captain of Elland Boys' Brigade. The hall was opened by Mrs Savage on 23rd January 1932. It stands next to Elland Wesley Chapel.

There are memorials for members of the Boys' Brigade who died in World War I and World War II, and for Harold Savage.

It is used as rehearsal rooms by the Anchormen Ensemble.

Harper
[Surname]

There are currently only around 3 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Harper. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Harper & Sutcliffe
Dyers at Luddendenfoot.

Partners included William Harper and Thomas Sutcliffe.

The partnership was dissolved in October 1839

Harper & Townsend
Worsted spinners at Burrwood Mill, Stainland [1869]. They occupied the 3rd, 4th and 5th floors of the mill.

Partners included Mr Harper and Mr Townsend

Harper & Worsick
Maltsters at Savile Park Road, Halifax [1874]

Harper Cliff Wood, Lightcliffe
Rookes Viaduct carried the Halifax to Bradford railway line over the valley here

Harper, John
[1809-1842] Architect. He was born at Dunkenhalgh Hall, Blackburn.

He trained under Benjamin and Philip Wyatt, and was involved in their designs for Apsley House, York House, and the Duke of York's Column in London.

Around 1835, he altered Shibden Hall adding the tower, the drive into Godley Road, and offices for Anne Lister. He also converted Northgate House, Halifax into an hotel.

The present appearance of Shibden Hall is the result of Harper's work.

He was a close friend of William Etty [1787-1849] – who painted the portrait of Harper linked below – and other artists.

He died of malaria on 18 October 1842 in Naples, Italy during The Grand Tour and was buried there.

See John Harper at Shibden

Harper, Mary
[16??-1710] She married (1) John Appleyard.

After John's death, she married (2) John Rudman from Halifax, at Halifax on 5th December 1700

Harper, Rev Robert
[1769-1829] He served at Shelley before becoming Minister of Heywood's Chapel [March 1801-1818].

Around 1803, he founded the first Sunday School in Northowram.

His Arianism and high Calvinism caused a split in the congregation, and several members left to establish another chapel at a couple of old cottages in Northowram. After receiving an inducement of £100, he resigned and moved to Leeds, and subsequently to Grassington [1822-1829]

Harper Royd, Norland

Owners and tenants have included

Some sources do not make it clear which of the following they are referring to: Lower Harper Royd, Middle Harper Royd or Upper Harper Royd

Harpur, William
[17??-1???] Coiner of Lee Bank He was imprisoned at Bradford

Harries, Raymond John
[19??-19??] Vicar of Halifax [1971]

Harrington, Albert
[1878-1916] Son of John Harrington.

Born in Oldham, Lancashire.

He was a cotton piecer [1891].

He joined the army [1896] and fought in the Boer War.

During World War I, he served as a Sergeant with the 8th Battalion, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry,

He died 13th January 1916 (aged 35).

He was buried at the Rue-Du-Bois Military Cemetery, Fleurbaix

Harrington, Daniel
[1851-1901] Son of John Harrington.

Born in Cork, Ireland.

He was a dyehouse labourer [1871]; a dyer's labourer [1881, 1891, 1901].

He married (1) Mary [1847-188?].


Mary was born in Cork, Ireland.

She was a factory operative [1871]

 

Children: (1) John [b 1871]; (2) Catherine [b 1874]; (3) Daniel; (4) Ellen [b 1880] who was a worsted spinner [1891]; (5) Mary [b 1882] who was a mill hand worsted [1901]; (6) Harriet [b 1888].

Mary died before 1888.

On 10th June 1888, he married (2) Margaret [1855-1894] at Halifax Parish Church.


Margaret of Range Bank, Northowram, was born in Morecambe, the daughter of David McFarlane, labourer, and widow of Mr Pattinson.

She had children by her first marriage:

Children: (1) David Patterson [b 1879] who was a woollen doffer [1891]; (2) Eliza Patterson [b 1883]; (3) Margaret Patterson [b 1884].

 

Children: (7) Priscilla [b 1890].

The family lived at 9 Beacon Street, Northowram [1871]; 5 Berry Street, Northowram [1881]; Charlestown Road, Northowram [1888]; 15 Berry Street, Northowram [1891, 1901]

Harrington, Daniel
[1877-1917] Son of Daniel Harrington.

Born in Halifax.

He was a dyer's labourer [1891, 1901]; a dyer [1911].

He lived at 9 Holden Street, Halifax [1911].

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 2nd/4th Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He was killed in action [31st August 1917].

He was buried at the Ecoust Military Cemetery, Ecoust-St. Mien [II A 6]

Harrington, John
[1839-1914] Born in Cork, Ireland.

He was a woollen dyer [1881]; a dyer's labourer [1891, 1901, 1911].

He served in the Army for 21, and was in India with Havelock at the Relief of Lucknow in the Indian Mutiny.

He married Mary A [1851-1???]


Mary was born in East Dean, Gloucester
 

Children: (1) Daniel [b Aldershot, Hampshire 1866] who was a worsted doffer [1881]; (2) John [b Gibraltar 1872] who was an iron turner [1891], a Sergeant in the 9th Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) [WW1]; (3) Jeremiah [b Scotland 1876]; (4) Albert; (5) Harriet Lucy [b 1881] who was a worsted twister [1901]; (6) Ada Ann [b 1883] who was a worsted spinner [1901]; (7) Frank Herbert [b 1885] who was a moulder's apprentice [1901]; (8) Miles Henry [b 1888] who was a worsted doffer [1901], an iron moulder [1911].

The family lived at 10 Prospect Street, Northowram [1881]; 2 Ramsgate Street, Halifax [1891]; 3 Burmah Street, Halifax [1901, 1911].

Living with them in 1901 were granddaughters: Amy Harrington [b Devonport 1896], Ada Harrington [b Alderney, Channel Islands 1897], and Grace Harrington [b Taunton, Somerset 1900].

John died October 1914 (aged 75) 

Harrington, Peter
[1817-18??] He was charged with the manslaughter of John Ingham [aged 67] at Chapel Fold, Halifax.

The prosecution said that on Christmas Day 1837, Harrington came up to Ingham and, without any provocation whatsoever, struck him on the chest with his fist, knocking him to the ground, and then ran off. Ingham was injured and died on 1st January 1838.

The defence said that Harrington accidentally pushed Ingham as he ran out of Chapel Fold in pursuit of someone who had taken his hat.

The jury found Harrington Not Guilty

Harris, C.
[1???-19??] Curate at Brighouse [1942-1944]

Harris, Rev C. H.
[19??-19??] He was Vicar of Christ Church, Barkisland. In 1949, he was appointed to Saint James's, Thornton

Harris, Rev Edwin T.
[18??-19??] Minister at United Methodist Free Church, Sowerby Bridge [1885]

Harris, Iestyn
[1976-] Born in Wales. Rugby league player. He has played for England, Warrington, Leeds, Bradford and Featherstone He lives in Todmorden

Harris, James
[1???-18??] Recorded in 1855, when he was a Methodist minister in Sowerby Bridge. It was also noted that
Brother Harris shall reside at Stainland

Harris, Jessica
[1981-] Actress.

Born in Halifax

Harris, John
[18??-1???] Beerhouse keeper at the Royal Hotel, Halifax [1882].

In July 1882, he went into liquidation

Harris, John
[18??-19??] Master of the Halifax Workhouse [1905]

On 16th November 1905, he married Lilian Bertha Williams, the matron at the Workhouse

Harris, Lew
[18??-19??] Tailor's apprentice who worked in the USA and returned to England to establish Harella in London in 1919. He moved to Halifax in the 1940s

Harris, Colonel R. H. W. H.
[18??-19??] CB.

He lived at Park Crescent, Sowerby Bridge [1905]

Harris, Rev S.
[18??-18??] Curate at Brighouse [1851]

Harris, Rev Stanford
[18??-18??] MA.

He was educated at Saint Edmund Hall Oxford, and was Chaplain to the West Riding Debtors' Gaol, and the Halifax Union House before becoming Stipendiary Curate at Parish Church of Saint Martin, Brighouse [1851]

Harris, William H.
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the West Riding Regiment.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Harrison
[Surname]

There are currently around 34 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Harrison. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Harrison family of Brighouse
See Hoyle House, Lightcliffe

Harrison, Rev Alexander J.
[18??-19??] BD.

Third Vicar of Lightcliffe [6th December 1888]

Harrison & Allott
Electroplaters, bronzers, laquerers and motor lamp repairers.

They were at 37 Bull Green, Halifax [1911, 1919] and 9 Lord Street [1936]

Harrison & Littlewood
Tobacconists and walking stick dealers next to the Palace Theatre at 30 Ward's End, Halifax [1905]

Harrison & Ryder
Halifax transport company.

In 1926, they were granted a charabanc licence for of a 14-seater Charabanc Registered Number CP 5107

Harrison & Shaw
Stuff manufacturers at Brighouse.

Partners included A. Harrison, S. Harrison, W. Harrison and J. Shaw.

The partnership was dissolved in July 1867

Harrison & Singleton
Timber merchants at Horton Street, Halifax. Their woodyard was damaged by fire on 19th April 1907

Harrison & Sykes
Quarry owners and stone merchants at Kirk Lane Quarry, Hipperholme [1905]. Partners included Aquilla Sykes

Harrison, E.
[18??-19??] Music publisher at 45 Crown Street, Halifax.

He lived at 6 Dryclough Lane [1905]

Harrison's: Enoch Harrison & Company
Cotton manufacturers at Crow Carr Ings Mill, Todmorden [1877]

Harrison, Eric
[19??-19??] Halifax-born pianist. He was educated at Heath Grammar School. He was Senior Lecturer in Piano at Melbourne University

Harrison, Eric
[1938-] Born in Mytholmroyd.

He played football for Halifax Town [1957-1964]. He became the youth team coach for Manchester United

Harrison, Frank
[18??-191?] Of Norland.

He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on Norland War Memorial

Harrison, Fred
[1873-1915] Son of Ralph Seddon Harrison.

Born in Halifax [23rd February 1873].

He was a pattern maker [1891].

He went to South Africa [1895].

He worked for the De Beers Consolidated Mines [from July 1895]. He was head of the data department of the Engineering Staff.

He fought in the Second Boer War. He joined the Kimberley Volunteers, and was made Sergeant [March 1896], Sergeant-Major [1897], Lieutenant [1897], and Captain [1897].

He served in Bechuanaland [1896-1897] (and was awarded medal and clasp), and in the South African War (Queen's medal and the Transvaal clasp, the Orange Free State clasp and the Kimberley clasp and King's medal and the South Africa 1901 clasp and the South Africa 1902 clasp).

On 3rd April 1899, he married Adelaide Emma Good.


Adelaide Emma was the eldest daughter of William Henry Good of Westport, County Mayo, Ireland
 

Children: (1) Frederick William [b 1900]; (2) Eileen Mary [b 1903]; (3) Ralph Benjamin [b 1910].

He resigned from the army in 1902.

When a 2nd Battalion, was formed, he rejoined as Captain.

He took part in the Expedition against German South-West Africa [30th September 1914-26th April 1915]. He was with the 7th Infantry (Kimberley Regiment), S. A. Forces.

He was killed in action at Trekkopjes, German South-West Africa, one of a small group of South African railway protection troops attacked by a German force [26th April 1915].

He was buried at the Trekkopje Cemetery, Namibia

Harrison, G. V.
[1???-19??] Recorded in 1946, when he and T. Valentine were proprietors of Valentine & Harrison.

He lived at 42 Eldon Place, Halifax

Harrison, Geoffrey
[18??-18??] He lived at Holden House, Barkisland.

He established a school here [1864]

Harrison, George
[1552-1???] Of Halifax.

On 14th December 1573, he married Agnes, daughter of Gilbert Fairbanks, in Halifax.

Children: (1) George; (2) Susannah; (3) Edward; (4) Grace; (5) Eden

Harrison, George William
[1868-19??] Son of John Harrison.

He married (1) Unknown.

In January 1921, he married (2) Annie Elizabeth, daughter of John Holmes.

The family lived at Hoyle House, Lightcliffe [1921]

Harrison Gibson
Furniture retailers established in the former premises of Thomas Simpson & Sons Limited in Silver Street, Halifax. The business closed in 1968

Harrison, Hannah
[16??-1693] Daughter and heiress of Richard Harrison of Wakefield.

She married John Smyth

Harrison's: Herbert Harrison (Bakers)
Recorded in 1944

Harrison House Branch Library, Halifax
See Halifax Lending Library, Harrison House, Halifax and Louis Stanley Jastrzębski

Harrison House, Halifax
10 Harrison Road. Built in 1834 as the headquarters for the Literary & Philosophical Society. The Society had previously used the nearby New Rooms. The new building was designed by William Gravatt, and comprised an entrance hall, a large lecture room, 2 smaller rooms, the museum which occupied the first floor, and apartments for Alexander Campbell, the keeper.

The Harrison House Branch Library was here until 1983

Harrison, James
[18??-1???] In 1846, he married Martha Sugden [1828-1901] in Halifax. Martha was a member of the Sugden family of Shelf

Harrison, James T.
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the Royal Naval Division.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Harrison, John
[1???-1559] He was presented as the Vicar of Halifax by Anne of Cleves in recognition of the grant for life made to her by her husband, Henry VIII. Anne had converted to the Catholic faith in 1555. Harrison took up the post on 12th July 1556. He died
at the beginning of Lent

and was buried in Halifax Parish Church on 13th February 1559/60.

See Sir William Saltonstall

Harrison, Rev John
[17??-176?] Curate at Parish Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, Elland [1753].

On 27th September 1753, he married Sarah Dyson.

Children: James Dyson [1754] who died in infancy

Harrison, John
[17??-18??] A grocer, tea and hop merchant who also sold bottled beer and porter. He had business at 4 Corn Market, Halifax [1834].

In May 1835, Thomas Collinson took over the business. Soon after acquiring the business, Collinson stopped selling beer and porter. Collinson opened his Golden Canister Tea Warehouse on the premises.

See Hoyland, Armistead & Company

Harrison, John
[18??-18??] Accountant and hat manufacturer at Foundry Street, Brighouse [1845]

Harrison, John
[18??-19??] Of Hoyle House, Lightcliffe.

He married Unknown.

Children: George William.

John was dead by the time of his son's second marriage [1921]

Harrison, John
[18??-191?] He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on All Saints' War Memorial, Dudwell

Harrison, Rev John
[1814-1883] DD.

Born in the Yorkshire Wolds. He was brought up as a Wesleyan but trained at Rotherham College before becoming Minister at Providence Congregational Church, Ovenden [1843-1846]. He lived at White Birch, Wheatley [1845].

In February 1846, he moved to Douglas on the Isle of Man.

He subsequently returned to the Church of England and became a curate at Rotherham and Sheffield before becoming vicar at Fenwick, where he died

Harrison, Rev John
[19??-19??] He was curate at Acomb before becoming Vicar of Heptonstall [1983-1990]

Harrison, John W.
[18??-191?] He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on Copley War Memorial

Harrison, Jonathan
[1798-1870] Vet. Lived and died at Great Clough House, Eastwood

Harrison, Miss
[1???-18??] She ran a private school in Halifax [around 1870]

Harrison, Mr
[17??-17??] Brighouse attorney.

He lived at Broad Oak, Hove Edge [1760]

Harrison, Ralph Seddon
[1851-1909] Son of James Harrison, goods porter.

Born in Bradshaw.

He was a cabinet maker [1871]; a pattern maker in machine shop [1881]; a pattern maker [1891].

In 1871, he married Mary Moore [1852-1???] at Halifax Parish Church.


Mary, born in Queensbury, was the daughter of Thomas Moore, reed and heald maker
 

Children: (1) Fred; (2) James Holmes [b 1876] who was a mechanics apprentice [1891]; (3) Willie [b 1880] who was a worsted operative [1891]; (4) Lily [b 1886]; (5) Edith [b 1888] who was a sewing machinist (underclothing) [1911]; (6) Emma [b 1894] who was a sewing machinist (blousemaking) [1911]; (7) child who died young; (8) child who died young; (9) child who died young; (10) child who died young; (11) child who died young.

The family lived at 4 Green Street, Northowram [1881]; 25 South Darley Street, Northowram [1891]; 14 Greenwood Street, Northowram [1911]

Harrison, Rev Robert
[17??-1761] Master of Hipperholme Grammar School, and Curate at Hartshead [1761]. He lived at Slead Hall, Brighouse

Harrison, Robert
[1754-1???] Baptised in Sowerby [1754].

He married Tabitha Thomas [1753-1???].


Tabitha was baptised in Elland [1753]
 

Children: Elizabeth who married William Pickles

Harrison, Samuel
[1863-1???] On 24th June 1863, he married Rachel Grandage in Bradford.


Rachel was the daughter of
William Grandage
 

Children: (1) Florence [b 1865]; (2) Mary [b 1866]; (3) Samuel [b 1868]; (4) William G [b 1870]; (5) Jane [b 1872]; (6) Rachel [b 1875]

Harrison, Thomas
[1???-18??] He was appointed Surveyor of the Highways for Shelf [1835]

Harrison, Thomas
[1761-1793] Of Kendal.

He married Anne, daughter of Thomas Ramsden.

Children: Anne [1788-1790. There is a memorial to members of the family in Halifax Parish Church where an inscription reads


Sacred to the Memory
of Anne, the wife of Thomas
Harrison and oldest daughter
of Thomas & Anne Ramsden,
who died April 5th 1788, aged
24 years.

Also of Thomas Harrison, formerly of Kendal, who died Jany 1st 1793, aged 32 years.
Also of their daughter Anne, who died Augt 24th 1790, aged 2 years.
Also to the memory of Rowland, eldest son of the above-named Thomas and Anne Ramsden, who died Decr 26th 1835, aged 76.

Harrison, W.
[18??-18??] Leather dealer at Halifax.

In June 1865, he was declared bankrupt

Harrison's: W. & G. Harrison
Stone masons at Greetland.

Partners included W. Harrison and G. Harrison.

The partnership was dissolved in January 1864

Harrison, William Greasley
[1901-1961] Born in Ashby-de-la-Zouch

In 1927, he married Lilian Ursula Ormerod in Stroud.


Lilian Ursula was born in Rastrick, the daughter of
George Frederick Ormerod
 

He died in Dover

Harrison, William Henry
[18??-1???] Partner in Hollingrake & Clegg Limited

The Harrock, Lightcliffe
A mock-Tudor house of the 19th century in Wakefield Road, Lightcliffe.

Owners and tenants have included

  • Nicholas & Jane Walker [1960s]

Harrop-Lomas, Gordon C.
[1???-19??] During World War II, he served with the Merchant Navy.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Harrop, Sarah
[17??-1811] Of Saddleworth. She was educated at Halifax. She studied singing with Thomas Stopford. She had a fine contralto and soprano voice and was famous for her tone and articulation.

On hearing her singing, Dr Howard of Leicester commented the

she would one day throw all the English, nay, even the Italian, female singers far behind here

He promoted her in London, and she met with success. She studied Italian music under Sacchini, and the music of Handel and older masters under her future husband. Her rendering of Purcell's Mad Bess was her most famous secular song.

She married Joah Bates. She had such success with her singing that she brought £6,000 or £8,000 as a marriage portion

Harrow Dog Kennels, Halifax
During the early days of World War I, Chief Constable Alfred Herbert Richardson was in charge of the kennels. They provided dogs for use in the trenches, for scouting with soldiers and for use in sentry duty at isolated posts

Harrowins House, Queensbury
Owners and tenants have included

Harry Castle Hill, Rastrick
Off Booth Royd Lane at the top of Strangstry Wood, overlooking Cromwell Bottom.

May Day temperance meetings were held here from the 19th Century until at least the 1940s

Hart, Captain Douglas
[1???-1???] Sub-Inspector of Factories for the Halifax district.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Douglas; (2) a daughter.

In June 1857, his son, Douglas, served with the Madras Presidency in India, where he was also a Captain. Returning from leave in England, he returned to India, taking his sister with him. In December 1858, he was shot and killed by a drunken Sepoy

Hart, Frederick S.
[1913-19??] Son of John Henry Hart.

Organist at Bethesda Primitive Methodist Chapel, Southowram [1936, 1957].

In 1940, he married Florence M. Ward in Halifax.


Florence was the daughter of Edward Oates Ward
 

Mrs Hart was also organist at the Chapel

They lived at 9 Battinson Street, Southowram [1957]

Hart, John Henry
[18??-19??] In [Q3] 1905, he married Clara Smith in Halifax.

Children: Frederick S.

Hart, Richard
[1783-18??] He was Captain in the Royal Navy (on half pay) [1851].

He married Harriet [1789-18??].

Children: Mary [b 1829].

The family lived at Savile Terrace, Halifax [1851]

Harte, Charles William Sheard
[1836-1889] He was a corporal with the 3rd Battalion West Riding Regiment [1854]; schoolmaster to the Regiment (for 13 years); employed in the Bombay Educational Department (for 5 years); held several ranks, rising to Quartermaster Sergeant [1889]; twice recommended for a commission but owing to the regulations in force, was debarred from obtaining it; awarded the medal for long service and good conduct; a member of the United Brothers Lodge of the Manchester Unity of Oddfellows [1876]; Deputy Grand Master of the District [1886]; Grand Master of the District [1887].

In 1870, he married Sophia Harper.

Children: (1) child; (2) Catharine [b 1875] who married Harry, son of Joseph Shaw Lees; (3) child; (4) child; (5) child; (6) child; (7) child.

The family lived at 4 Walsh Street, Queens Road, Halifax [1889] where he died.

He was buried at Saint Paul's Church, King Cross

Hartland, Ernest E.
[18??-191?] Of Sowerby.

During World War I, he served as a Private.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on the World War I Memorial in Sowerby Church

Hartle, Derek
[19??-19??] A financier who bought Broadbent & Schofield and then Graham & Normanton. The combined companies operated from Mytholmroyd and were known as Broadbent Machine Tool Company.

Around 1971, he also bought the Stanley Machine Tool Company Limited.

In 1979, the business went into receivership. It was bought by Brooke Tool Engineering (Holdings) Limited

Hartley...
The entries for people with the surname Hartley are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Hartley
The surname has roots locally and in South Yorkshire.

George Redmonds writes that William de Herteley is recorded at Sowerby in 1297, John Hertlay is recorded at Langfield in 1379, and Roger Hartley is recorded at Southowram in 1516.

There are currently around 88 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hartley. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hartley & Astin
Fustian manufacturers and wholesale clothiers at Linden Mill / Hebden Works, Hebden Bridge [1905].

Partners included Robert Fielding Hartley and John Astin

Hartley & Crabtree
Hebden Bridge iron-founders. Partners included Henry Crabtree.

They produced a range of goods, including railings, lamp-posts, and machinery. The name can still be seen on some old grates

Hartley & Hartley
Cloth fullers at Wheatley.

Partners included W. Wheatley and R. Wheatley.

The partnership was dissolved in December 1868

Hartley & Sugden Limited
Iron founders, boiler-makers and heating engineers established at Victoria Road, Gibbet Street, Halifax around 1873.

In the 1920s, they started producing oil-fired boilers, including

The Heatanbake Boiler
The Oilex range
They had business at several places in Halifax, including the former Fairfield Methodist Church [1890], 229 Gibbet Street [1905], Atlas Works, Albert Foundry, and Perseverance Works.

Around 1909, they bought out Northern Engineering Company Limited.

Partners included J. E. Hartley and Zaccheus Sugden.

See Samuel T. Crook

Hartley & Walker
Printers at Old Market and Cheapside, Halifax.

Partners included Joseph Hartley and James Uriah Walker.

They printed William Milner's first books [1834] and Crabtree's History of Halifax [1836]

Hartley, Carter & Company Limited
Quarry owners and stone merchants at Barclay Quarry, Southowram and Cross Platts Quarry, Southowram

Hartley's: James, Samuel Fielden & Bernard Hartley
Woollen cloth manufacturers and merchants at Thorn Tree, Halifax Partners included James Hartley, Samuel Fielden Hartley, Bernard Hartley, Richard Henry Hartley, and Thomas Hartley. Samuel Fielden Hartley left the partnership [1st May 1827], leaving James & Bernard.

Thomas Hartley joined. Richard Henry Hartley joined the partnership and left [25th March 1836]. leaving Bernard & Thomas

Hartley's: John Hartley Limited
Printing business established by John Hartley in Elland and Brighouse

Hartley, Kaye & Company
Quarry owners & stone merchants at Cross Platts Quarry, Southowram. Established in 1876 by Joseph Shedeur Hartley and Mr Kaye.

In 1905, they had an office at North Bridge Station.

See Joseph J. Hartley

Hartley's: M. & H. Hartley
Stationers at Halifax. Partners included M. Hartley and H. Hartley.

In September 1852, the partnership was declared bankrupt

Hartley's Malleable Fittings Company Limited
Makers of pipe fittings at Bell Hall, Halifax [1937]

Hartley Royd Farm, Cornholme
Blue Bell Lane. Early 17th century yeoman clothier's house. Some of the windows were blocked for the window tax.

The property was owned by John Stansfield and then the Fielden family.

A tablet over the door reads

John Fielden et Elizabeth Uxor ejus Ann: Dom. 1724

John Fielden and his wife, Elizabeth AD 1724

John Fielden was a Quaker, and allowed Hartley Royd to be used for Quaker gatherings, marriages etc.

Nearby property –

  • A late 17th century cottage

  • A late 17th century outbuilding, with a lintel inscribed IMF 1671

  • A mid 18th century barn
- are listed.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

The building was extended in the 19th century

Hartley Royd Farm, Warley
Buttress Lane. A timber-framed aisled house is mentioned in the 14th century.

The present F-plan building has a cross-passage and a cross-wing. It was built around 1607 by John Murgatroyd and was the home of the

Parts were rebuilt in the 18th/19th century

Hartley Sons & Company
20th century clothing manufacturer and wholesale clothiers at Linden Works, Hebden Bridge.

See Robert Fielding Hartley

Hartley's: W. & R. Hartley & Company
Woolstaplers at Horton Street, Halifax [1845]. Partners included Robert Hartley

Hartleys Cinemas Limited
Of Manchester.

See Hippodrome Theatre, Todmorden, Albert Ernest Nicholls and Olympia Cinema, Todmorden

Hartnett, Charles
[18??-18??] He ran a school in Sowerby [around 1861]

Hartnett, Rev Daniel
[18??-18??] In 1834, he established Hartnett's Boarding & Day School, Halifax.

He was head of Warley Grammar School from 1851 until 1853 when he was dismissed for turning the grammar school into a private school and taking boys from wherever he could outside Warley. In January 1855, he appeared at the Yorkshire Insolvent Debtors' Court.

After leaving Warley, he had a private school at White Windows.

See Mary Hartnett

Hartnett, Mary
[18??-18??] She had a ladies' boarding school in Halifax [1845].

See Rev Daniel Hartnett

Hartney, John Thomas
[18??-1917] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 1st/6th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers.

He died 4th May 1917.

He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial [3C & 3D], and in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Harton Cleaners, Hipperholme
Dry-cleaning business run by Reg HARgreaves and Lou OrTON

Hartshead Band
Established in the 1860s. They rehearsed at the Grey Ox Inn. It was disbanded in 19??

Hartshead Board of Guardians
A part of the Halifax Poor Law Union.

Those who have served on the Board of Guardians for Hartshead township have included

Hartshead-cum-Clifton
The two villages Hartshead and Clifton once formed a single parish.

The combined name is recorded in 1647.

In 1811, it was in the parish of Dewsbury.

Clifton became a separate parish in 1887 Saint John the Evangelist as the parish church.

See Kirklees Priory and Saint Peter's Church, Hartshead

Hartshead Hall
Owners and tenants of the Hall have included

The building was demolished in 1959

Hartshead Lane Ends
A piano piece mentioned in 1887

Hartshead, Manor of
When the Normans took the land, it was held by Ilbert, and Elsi became a tenant and first Lord of the Manor of Hartshead.

At the time of Domesday Book, Gerneber was Lord of the Manor of Hartshead.

Subsequent Lords of the Manor

In the 12th century, the Manor passed to the Radclyffe family.

See Manor House, Hartshead

Hartshead Moor
Service station on the M62 motorway was started in 1971.

The service station lies in Calderdale.

In 1812, a delivery of shearing frames destined for Cartwright's mill was attacked and destroyed by Luddites as it crossed Hartshead Moor.

In February 1974, 12 people died – 9 soldiers, 1 wife and 2 children – and many were injured when a provisional IRA bomb destroyed a coach near Junction 26; the coach was carrying soldiers and their families back to Catterick. There is a plaque on the westbound carriageway commemorating those who died.

In November 1974, based on her confession, 25-year-old Judith Ward was convicted of the bombing and sentenced to life imprisonment in Wakefield Jail. In 1992, she was freed by an Appeals Court on grounds of unreliable evidence and forensic tests. Her confession was a fabrication

Hartshead Musical Society
Mentioned in the 1920s

Hartshead stocks
The remains of the stocks stood opposite the entrance gate to Hartshead Church

Hartshead Surveyor of the Highways
Those who held the post of Surveyor of the Highways for Hartshead included:

The Hartshorn, Halifax
An area of Halifax, aka Sunderland Fold, which John Caygill bought from the Sunderland family of Ackton. The Square was built here

Harty, Dr John Percy Ingham
[18??-19??] BA, MB, BCh.

Physician and surgeon. He was Medical Officer for Southowram and Skircoat Wards [1905].

He was in a medical partnership with Archibald Nadauld Brushfield. In 1911, they had business addresses at Coronation Road, Halifax and Whitegate View, Siddal. The partnership was dissolved 1st January 1912.

He lived at Whitegate View, 38 Whitegate Road, Siddal [1905]

Harvelin Park
Area to the east of Todmorden

Harvey & Company
Non-alcoholic barley beer brewers. Brewers at Albert Brewery, Halifax [1901, 1905].

Around 1906, they used the brewery at the Grove Brewery, Brearley

In 1918, the business was acquired by Whitaker's and the brewery was demolished

Harvey, Eugene
[19??-19??] Local man who was a fervent campaigner for the restoration of the E in the spelling of Bailiffe Bridge

Harvey, Rev J. D.
[19??-19??] Vicar of Saint Paul's Church, Cross Stone, In 1962, he was appointed vicar at Morley

Harvey, Rev O. D.
[18??-19??] He was Curate-in-Charge at Sheffield before becoming Vicar of Mytholmroyd [1931]

Harvey, Roger
[19??-] OBE.

Head of Harvey's Department Store in Halifax.

He was made a Freeman of the Borough of Calderdale in 2011

Harvey, Ven R. C. M.
[18??-19??] MA.

Archdeacon of Halifax [1933]

Harveys of Halifax
Halifax department store which started as E. T. Harvey Limited.

The business was founded in the 1920's by E. T. Harvey in a small unit in Dewsbury. By the 1950s, the business had expanded to three shops in Halifax, Wakefield and Harrogate.

Since 1950, the company has occupied the property which was formerly Waddington's Dress Warehouse in Rawson Street.

Do you remember the reflection-free concave windows and the fur coats of the 1950s?

In late 1988, the company bought the adjacent Tramways building from the council and developed this into retail space, and, over the last few years, the business has expanded, absorbing neighbouring premises on Powell Street and Commercial Street, and the former Lancashire & Yorkshire Bank building.

Harvie, R.
[18??-19??] Halifax sculptor who produced the carvings on the Victoria Hall

Harwood, Ashworth
[1846-1915] Son of Crossley Harwood.

Born in Wadsworth.

He was a whitesmith [1873].

On 1st March 1873, he married Mary Hitchin in Halifax.


Mary was the daughter of Phineas Hitchin
 

Children: (1) Claudine [1879-1957] who married William Wilde; (2) Annie Eliza [b 1885]; (3) Miriam [1889-1910]; (4) Joe.

The children were born in Midgley

The couple died in Midgley: Mary [1900]; Ashworth [11th June 1915]

Harwood, Brian
[19??-19??] Son of Henry William Harwood.

He was a reporter for the Halifax Courier after World War II, principally reporting on the courts and crime

Harwood Brothers
Whitesmiths at Hebden Bridge [1905]. Partners included Herbert Harwood

Harwood, Crossley
[1824-1886] He was a whitesmith.

In [Q2] 1846, he married Sarah Ashworth [1825-1898] in Halifax.

Children: Ashworth

Harwood, Edgar
[1857-1927] Son of James Harwood. He became a partner in the family business – James Harwood & Sons.

In 1895, he married Ada Townsend, in Todmorden.

In May 1909, the couple were walking along the Blake Dean bridge with Ada's 16-year-old nephew George Arthur Smith and their lodger Miss Mary Ann Edith Milnes, when Ada and her nephew stepped on to a small wooden platform to allow the workers' train to pass. She died on 22nd May 1909 after falling 108 ft into the ravine when the platform on collapsed. George Arthur Smith, survived by hanging on to the railings.

Later that year, Edgar married Mary Ann Edith Milnes.

He lived at Hurst Dene, Hebden Bridge.

He was killed when a grindstone burst at the works.

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £7,962

Harwood, Harwood
[1853-1933] Son of John Harwood.

Born in Wadsworth.

He was a cotton fustian cutter [1871]; a publican at Mount Skip, Wadsworth [1901]; Mount Skip Inn, Mytholmroyd, Hebden Bridge [1901].

In 1906, he married Melinda Baldwin [1864-19??] from Warley, in Todmorden.

Living with them [1901] was niece Damaras White [b 1878].

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1892

Harwood, Henry William
[1885-1967] A native of Midgley. Journalist and antiquarian.

He started work in a mill. By the age of 18, he had read every book in the library at the Midgley Methodist Chapel.

In 1905, he became a reporter on the Halifax Daily Courier. In 1919, he became the Halifax correspondent for The Yorkshire Observer. In 1938, he returned to become Chief Reporter on the Halifax Daily Courier.

For some time, he wrote a village newspaper, The Midgley Intelligencer.

In 1910, he married Mary Hannah Crabtree [18??-1956].

Children: (1) Constance; (2) Brian.

He lived at Newstead House, Halifax, then with his daughter at Top o' th' Hill, Norton Tower.

He was interested in dialect. He was responsible for reviving the local Pace Egg play. He was a keen walker and, with Tom Green, he wrote a booklet on Country Walks around Halifax.

See Halifax Antiquarian Society

Harwood, Herbert
[18??-19??] Son of James Harwood. He became a partner in the family business – James Harwood & Sons

Harwood, Herbert
[18??-19??] Partner in Harwood Brothers.

He lived at Rose Grove, Hebden Bridge [1905]

Harwood House, Illingworth Moor
Around 1711, Mrs Phoebe Fourness gave the property and some land nearby such that the produce was to be distributed on the Feast of Saint John Baptist and Christmas Day, in equal portions, ever year, to the most necessitous poor

Harwood, Rev Jacob
[17??-1???] Minister of Sowerby Congregational Church [1788].

In 1794, he went to America

Harwood, James
[1???-1956] Of Mytholmroyd.

He was Chairman of Levi Harwood & Company Limited.

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £72,351

Harwood, James
[18??-1880] In 1847, he established James Harwood & Sons.

He married Mary Ann Ashworth.

Children: (1) William; (2) Edgar; (3) Wallace; (4) Herbert.

His sons became partners in the family business – James Harwood & Sons

Harwood, James
[1804-18??] Born in Midgley.

He was a woollen weaver [1841]; a farmer of 8 acres [1851]; a farmer of 7½ acres [1861].

He married Sarah [1807-1???].

Children: (1) John; (2) Sarah [b 1831] who was a hand loom weaver woollen [1851]; (3) Jonas [b 1833] who was an apprentice living with Henry Whitworth [1851]; (4) Richard [b 1836]; (5) Martha [1838-1846?]; (6) Levi.

The family lived at Springs, Midgley [1841]; Stony Springs, Midgley [1851]; Springs, Midgley [1861]

Harwood, James
[1827-1840] He worked at Henry Ambler's Shay Lane Mill.

He died at the Halifax Infirmary & Dispensary after being caught by a strap and twisted round one of the shafts at the Mill

Harwood's: James Harwood & Sons
Spring, tongue and shuttle-tip makers established in 1847 at Midgley by James Harwood. In 1862, the business moved to Crown Street, Hebden Bridge. In 1892, they moved to The Crown Works, Hebden Bridge. Harwood's sons became partners in the business. The firm exported to many parts of the world. In 1895, they employed around 35 workers.

See Edgar Harwood

Harwood, Joe
[1891-1961] Son of Ashworth Harwood.

Born in Midgley.

He was a loom tuner [1913].

In [Q1] 1913, he married Edith Walton [1893-1970] in Halifax.


Edith was born in Halifax
 

The couple died in Southport: Joe [1961]; Edith [1970]

Harwood, John
[1810-1876] Son of whitesmith John Harwood.

Born in Wadsworth.

He was a farmer 2 acres & beer seller at Mount Skip, Wadsworth [1851]; a carter [1860]; a farmer 8 acres & ale seller [1861]; a beerhouse keeper & farmer of 7 acres [1871].

He married (1) Unknown.

Children: (1) Mariah [b 1848]; (2) Sarah Ann [b 1851].

In 1851, he was listed as married with daughter Sarah Ann, and was living with widow Nancy Horsfall [1821-1892], daughter of textile singer John Ingham, at Mount Skip. Nancy was born in Durham.

In 1860, he married (2) Nancy at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Harwood; (2) Elizabeth A [b 1860].

In 1871, the children appeared on the census as Maria Harwood Horsfall, Sarah A Harwood Horsfall, Harwood Harwood Horsfall, and Elizabeth A Harwood Horsfall.

The family lived at Mount Skip Inn, Wadsworth [1851, 1861, 1871]; Higher Raw, Wadsworth, Hebden Bridge [1881]; Mount Skip Inn, Wadsworth [1891]

Nancy was publican/beer seller at Mount Skip Inn [1881, 1891]

Living with them [1881, 1891] was granddaughter Damaras White [b 1878]

Harwood, John
[1827-1???] Son of James Harwood.

He was a woollen weaver [1841]; a hand loom weaver woollen [1851]; a blanket manufacturer [1881].

He lived at Stubley Grove, Wardle, Rochdale [1881]

Staying with him in 1881 was his niece Frances, daughter of Levi Harwood

Harwood, John
[1867-18??] Son of Levi Harwood.

Partner in Levi Harwood & Company Limited [1874]

Harwood, John William Marmaduke
[1863-1941] In 1896, he married Matilda Horsfall. Her family had been licensees at the Victoria, Halifax for some time. He was licensee at the pub [1905]

Harwood, Jonas
[18??-18??] Partner in Levi Harwood & Company Limited [1874]

Harwood, Levi
[1840-1907] Son of James Harwood.

Born in Midgley.

He was a wool sorter [1861]; a flock & blanket dealer [1871]; a woollen manufacturer employing 60 hands [1881]; a woollen manufacturer (employer) [1891]; a woollen blanket manufacturer (employer) [1901]. He established Levi Harwood & Company Limited.

In 1865, he married (1) Grace Lamb [1845-1876] in Halifax.


Grace was born in Sowerby
 

Children: (1) John; (2) Frances [b 1868] who was staying with her uncle John Harwood [1881]; (3) James [b 1875] who was a woollen blanket manufacturer [1891, 1901]; (4) Albert Dewhirst [b 1876] who was a woollen blanket manufacturer [1901].

Grace died in [Q1] 1876, shortly after giving birth to son Albert.

In 1878, he married (2) Hannah Wilcock [1836-1900] in Ormskirk.


Hannah was born in Sowerby
 

The family lived at Brampton Grove, Brearley, Midgley [1871]; Mill House, Lower Brearley, Midgley [1881]; Mill House, Midgley [1891]; Mill House, Silver Street, Midgley [1891]; Springroyd, Brearley [1905]; Springs Royd, Mytholmroyd [1901].

He died 19th March 1907.

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £42,171 8/9d. of which £31,737 19/7d is net personalty Probate was granted to son James Harwood and Henry William Helliwell (woollen manufacturers) 

Harwood's: Levi Harwood & Company Limited
Woollen & blanket manufacturers at Stoney Springs Mill, Brearley, Brearley Lower Mills, Midgley, Luddendenfoot, and Cleckheaton. Established by Levi Harwood.

Recorded in 1874, 1905 and 1956.

Partners included John Harwood [1874], Jonas Harwood [1874], and James Harwood [Chairman 1956]

Harwood, Mary Selina
[1845-1???] A domestic servant of Halifax.

On 16th October 1868, she was charged with attempting to murder her new-born daughter by putting the baby down the water closet on 29th September 1868. The infant's cries were heard and she was rescued. In her defence, the surgeon who had visited her on the day of the offence, said that she was insensible in bed and very weak. It was quite possible for a woman in her condition to go to the water closet and not be aware that she had delivered a child. She was acquitted

Harwood, Rev T. G.
[19??-19??] He was assistant curate at Whitby before being appointed to Saint Michael & All Angels' Church, Cornholme [1949]

Harwood, Wallace
[18??-19??] Son of James Harwood. He became a partner in the family business – James Harwood & Sons

Harwood Well
See Highroad Well

Harwood, William
[18??-19??] Son of James Harwood. He became a partner in the family business – James Harwood & Sons. He lived at Eiffel House, Hebden Bridge [1905]

Harwood's: William Harwood & Sons
Shuttle tip makers at Foster Mill, Hebden Bridge.

Recorded in 1914

Haslam, J.
[18??-18??] Wholesale and retailer of toys, jewellery, cutlery, and smallware at 25 Cheapside, Halifax [1866]

Haslam, Rev John Fearby
[1811-1850] BA.

Born in Halifax. He was educated at Heath School. In 1825, he left Heath and was placed under the tuition of Rev J. W. Brooks of East Retford. In 1828, his father died and he returned to Yorkshire. He was placed under the tuition of Rev W. H. Bull at Sowerby. He established an evening school at Sowerby Croft, Norland and started a religious mission at Norland. In 1832, he went to Saint John's College Cambridge.

In 1837, he married Miss Denton at Chesterfield. In 1838, the couple sailed as missionaries to Ceylon where he learned Singhalese and Sanskrit. He translated several works and revised the Singhalese Bible

Haslam, W. C.
[1???-18??] He had a school in Halifax [1822]

Haslem, Albert Edward
[1881-1945] He was a tailor [1932].

In 1904, he married Elizabeth Ann Balmforth in Halifax.

Children: Constance Mary [b 1906] who married [4/6/1932] commercial traveller John Edgar Harrison [1907-1???].

The family lived at 31 Hopwood Lane, Halifax [1932]

Haslem, R. Aked
[18??-19??] Beerhouse keeper at Halifax.

In June 1877, he went into liquidation

Haslingden & Todmorden Roads Bill
The bill for the turnpike from Haslingden to Todmorden was given royal assent in August 1857.

See Gauxholme Viaduct

Hassall, Samuel
[18??-1863] In 1845, he was listed as a carver, gilder and picture frame maker, register office for servants, and temperance coffee house. at 17 Bull Green, Halifax

Hassock
Many of those in local churches and chapels were produced by Lightowler & Company Limited after Arthur Lawrence Lightowler joined the business.

Baxter & Granger also produced hassocks [1905].

Butler's manufactured machines for stuffing hassocks in the 1920s

Haste, Rev Alfred George
[1863-1930] Son of Maria [née Dodds] [1833-1910] and George Haste [1833-1871].

Born in Marylebone, London [9th December 1863].

He was a clerk for a timber merchant [1881]; a Minister in Sheffield [1901]; a Minister in Leeds [1911]; at York Road Baptist Church, Leeds. before becoming Minister at Blackley Particular Baptist Church [1921-1927].

He was known as

the parson with the flower in his coat

on account of his floral button-holes

In 1894, he married Fanny Elizabeth Huntington [1870-1969] in Camberwell.


Fanny Elizabeth was the daughter of Agnes Maria [née Hawkins] [1833-1891] and James Ingram Huntington [1825-1899]
 

Children: (1) Theodore Fullerton [1895-1973] who married [1923] Elsie May Turner [1895-1982]; (2) Phyllis Dora [1899-1997] who married [3rd September 1919] Frank Vaux [1901-1940].

Alfred George died in Leeds [18th July 1930].

Fanny Elizabeth died in Barkston Ash, Yorkshire [1969]

Haswell, Rev J. V.
[18??-19??] He was vicar of Scisset before becoming Vicar of Heptonstall [1922]

The Hat Box
Milliners. They were at 11 Woolshops, Halifax [1936] when the proprietor was R. A. Dempsey

Hatch, Frank Howard
[1862-1933] Born in Frinsted, Sussex.

He was a brewer.

He took over Brackenbed brewery between 1897 and 1900.

A 1900 advertisement for his business announced


Brackenbed Brewery Bitter
Mild & Stout in Cask and Bottle
Ales 10d, 1/-d, 1/2d & 1/4d. per gallon
Stout 1/2d. per gallon

Wheatley, Halifax

In 1896, he married Rosa Ann Sadler [1871-1950] in West Bromwich.

Children: (1) Howard Sadler [1897-1975] who died in Montreal; (2) Nancy Rosa [1902-1975].

The family lived at Quarry House, Coley [1901]; 3 Heath Villas, Halifax [1911].

He died in St Columb, Cornwall [26th May 1933]

Hatchet Farm, Ovenden
Owners and tenants have included

Hatchet Hall, Ovenden Wood
House. Recorded in 1907

Hatfield, J. A.
[1???-18??] He had drapery establishments in Halifax and Bradford [1856].

In December 1856, he was summoned in Halifax by Mrs Martha Drake

for the purpose of affiliating bastard child

Martha had been the superintendent in Hatfield's Bradford workshop, and, after he had made overtures of marriage to her, she became pregnant. He sent her away to a place in the neighbourhood of Northowram and left her destitute.

An order of 2/6d per week was made against Hatfield. Using figures for average earnings, 2/6d in 1856 is roughly the equivalent of £78.40 today

Hatheley
Old name for a part of Hipperholme

Hathershelf
Area near Mytholmroyd.

First mentioned in 1274, the name means shelf of land with heather.

See Hathershelf Lane, Boulderclough, Lower Hathershelf Farm, Boulderclough, Middle Hathershelf Farm, Boulderclough, The Bannister Family of Hathershelf, The Hermit of Hathershelf and Upper Hathershelf Farm, Boulderclough

Hathershelf Farm
This is discussed in In & About Our Old Homes.

See Hathershelf, Lower Hathershelf Farm, Boulderclough, Middle Hathershelf Farm, Boulderclough and Upper Hathershelf Farm, Boulderclough

Hathershelf Scout
An outcrop of rocks above the Calder just east of Mytholmroyd.

See Joseph Bailey, Scout, Scout Wood, Mytholmroyd and Stake Lane, Mytholmroyd

Hatten, Rev James
[17??-18??] Minister at Sowerby [1833].

See Rishworth Independent Church

Hatters

Hattersley Heaton
Originally A. Heaton & Company (Valves). Valve manufacturers of Bradford Road, Brighouse. This was associated with Hattersley (Ormskirk) Limited The company closed in October 1980

Hattersley (Ormskirk) Limited
Brass founders at Spring Hall Lane, Halifax. The firm was the successor to United Brass Founders & Engineers Limited and was established by Richard Edwin Hattersley. The head office was in Ormskirk where Hattersley lived.

Recorded in 1937.

The firm subsequently had works in Brighouse which became known as Hattersley Heaton.

The business later became Pegler-Hattersley

A band, known as the Hattonians, was formed to raise money for Hattersley's Comfort Fund for the armed forces during World War II

Hattersley, Richard Edwin
[1877-19??] In 1897, he set up a workshop in 2 converted cottages in Daisy Street, Halifax. He designed and developed looms.

Still running his own company, he became secretary then a director of Gaukroger, Sykes [1900].

Under his control, the firm evolved into United Brass Founders & Engineers Limited and then Hattersley (Ormskirk) Limited

Hatton, Caroline
[1823-1853] Daughter of Joseph Hatton.

Born in Hamburg.

She married Henry Edmunds.

She died of complications a few months after giving birth to Henry.

She was buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 372]

Hatton, Charles Wesley
[1839-1904] Son of William Hatton.

On 6th December 1865, he married Elizabeth Chambers at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: Mary (Minnie) [1868-1900] who married John Dunning Prickman and died in childbirth

Hatton, Rev James
[1773-1840] He trained at Hoxton Academy before becoming Minister at Sowerby Congregational Church [December 1803]. He was ordained in 1804.

On 27th May 1805, he married Esther Garnett [d 1841] from Bradford.

His wife is buried at Sowerby. There is a monument to James in the chapel

Hatton, John
[1724-1792] Of Lightcliffe. A well-known local Methodist. He was one of the earliest Methodists in the district.

He married Elizabeth [1723-1798].

Children: (1) Abraham who died in infancy; (2) Betty who died in infancy; (3) Nancy who died in infancy; (4) Samuel who died in infancy; (5) Mary [1751-1827].

Members of the family were buried at Lightcliffe Church

See Mount Pleasant Chapel, Hipperholme

Hatton, Joseph
[1790-1845] Son of William Hatton.

He was a merchant, dealing in china. He went to live and work in Hamburg, before coming to Halifax around 1835.

On 30th May 1811, he married (1) Sarah Sherwin in Burslem, Staffordshire.

Children: (1) Mary [1812-1816] who was born in Leeds and died in Hamburg; (2) child [1812-1816] who died in Germany at the age 3 years 8 months; (3) William / Thomas William [1821-1861] who died at Kingston, Canada West; (4) Caroline.

His first wife died in Hamburg.

On 7th September 1826, he married (2) Mary Marshall at Saint Mary's, Hornsey, London.

Children: (4) son [1828] stillborn in Hamburg; (5) Mary [Hamburg 1831-1860] who married [1856] Watts Wilkinson Goudge at Saint Jude's, Islington; (6) Phoebe Ann [1835-1927] who married John Edwards Hill.

The family lived at Stoke Newington, London [1858]; Skircoat House, Halifax [1861]. He died in London

Hatton, William
[17??-18??] Of Lightcliffe. Son of John Hatton.

A well-known local Methodist. He was one of the earliest Methodists in the district. He wrote a book about local preachers, and in 1824, he wrote

A Sketch of Methodism in Halifax and its Vicinity from its commencement in 1741 to the present period

He married Elizabeth.

Children: (1) William; (2) Joseph; (3) John [b 1792] who died at the age of 6 months; (4) John [b 1793] who died at the age of 2 weeks

Hatton, William
[1789-1857] Son of William Hatton.

Born in Halifax.

He established William Hatton & Company.

On 18th September 1815, he married Mary Ann Rigg in Halifax.

Children: (1) Emma [1817-1866]; (2) Mary Ann [1819-1875]; (3) John William [1821-1865]; (4) Elizabeth Emmet [1823-1842]; (5) Sarah Hannah [1825-1843]; (6) Jane Ellen [1828-1845]; (7) Joseph Douglas [b 1830]; (8) William Wilberforce [1834-1908]; (9) George Alfred [b 1836]; (10) Charles Wesley [1839-1904].

He lived at 7 New Road, Halifax [1845].

See Halifax, Bradford & Keighley Insurance Company

Hatton's: William Hatton & Company
Woollen manufacturers and merchants established by William Hatton. They were at 52 Woolshops House, Horton Street, Halifax [1822] and Church Street, Halifax [1845]

Hattonians
A dance band formed in 1940 by Joe Mottram, a tool maker at Hattersley Limited, to raise money for Hattersley's Comfort Fund for the armed forces

The members of the band included Eddie Barker [saxophone], Joe Mottram [violin], Arthur Shea [drums], Arthur Varey [trumpet], Norman Wilkinson [violin], and Harry Wilson [piano].

The band later reformed under the name Ecko

Haugh
Area of Todmorden

Haugh End Farm, Sowerby
Haugh End Lane. Early 18th century farmhouse associated with Haugh End House, Sowerby

Haugh End House, Sowerby
Haugh End Lane. Built around 1760 – next door to Old Haugh End, Sowerby – by John Carr for John Lea. The property passed to his daughter Lydia and son-in-law, Joseph Priestley, and the Priestley family and the Rawson family.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

At the house, there are Swiss cow-bells which were worn by John Selwyn Rawson's prize-winning cattle, and trophies – including a carved elephant's tusk – from an expedition to Benin, Nigeria, led by Admiral Sir Harry Holdsworth Rawson.

The house is haunted by the ghost of a woman.


Pronunciation: The name is pronounced Haw end
 

The House is discussed in Buildings in the Town & Parish of Halifax and Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions.

See Haugh End Farm, Sowerby

Haugh Hall, Halifax
House which stood in the Haugh Shaw area of Halifax at the end of the 18th century

Haugh House, Todmorden
Haugh Road. Haugh House, Haugh Cottage and Haugh Farm comprise a group of late 17th century and late 18th century property

Haugh, John
[17??-18??] Or Haigh. A blacksmith. Around 1803, he built Dyson Lane Mill, Rishworth

Haugh Shaw
Area to the west of Halifax.


Pronunciation: The name is pronounced Hoff shaw
 

Haugh Shaw Cottage, Halifax
Owners and tenants have included

Haugh Shaw House, Halifax
17th century house, aka Haugh Shaw Hall, Haugh Shaw Villa, Hough Hall, Houghshawe, and Upper Haugh Shaw.

There was a 2-storey high porch.

Owners and tenants have included

This is discussed in Sketches of Old Halifax.

See Upper Haugh Shaw House, Halifax

Haugh Shaw Road Infants' School Baths
Baths were added to Haugh Shaw Road Infants' School in 1902. The design was by Horsfall's architecture practice

Haughcroft End, Greetland
House built around 1705

Haunted Calderdale

Hauworth, James
[1???-1???] Of Kilnspring. Son of Jeremy Hauworth. He married Susan Law from Dulesgate

Hauworth, Jeremy
[17??-1???] Aka Jeremy the Singer. Son of Jeremy Hauworth. He was choirmaster at Saint Mary's Church, Todmorden

Hauworth, Jeremy
[17??-17??] Of Langfield.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Sally who married Jeremiah Bottomley; (2) Jeremy; (3) James; (4) Jonathan; (5) John; (6) a daughter who married Jonas Roberts

Hauworth, John
[1???-1???] Of Hanging-ditch, Todmorden, Son of Jeremy Hauworth

Hauworth, Jonathan
[1???-1???] Of Doghouse. Son of Jeremy Hauworth. He married Susan, daughter of John Ramsbottom

Hauxwell, Albert
[1857-1927] Son of Mary [née Dobby] [1814-1879] and Francis Hauxwell [1818-1904], a fishmonger from Harmby

Born in Harmby, Yorkshire.

He was a woolstapler; a partner in Dawson & Hauxwell.

In 1880, he married Mary Elizabeth Dawson [1856-1931] in Halifax.


Mary Elizabeth was born in Littleborough
 

Children: (1) Harold Dawson [1881-1896]; (2) Frederick [1885-1922] who married [1913] Annie Cliffe [1884-1955]; (3) Mary Jane [1888-1945] who married [1915] Charles Boocock [1888-1970]; (4) Amy 1890 [b 1974]; (5) Nellie 1893 [b 1898]; (6) Dorothy 1895 [b 1979] who never married; (7) Margaret 1898 [b 1968] who married [1927] Arthur Douglas Worsnop [1892-1972].

The family lived at 18 Craven Terrace, Halifax [1905].

Albert died in Halifax [8th September 1927].

Mary Elizabeth died in Halifax [2nd May 1931]

Haven, Luddenden
Ringstone Hill. 17th century farmhouse

Havercake
Local bread made with oatmeal, water, salt and yeast.

The dough is pressed into flat cakes which are cooked on a bakestone and then hung over the fireplace on a breadfleak to dry.

The word comes from the Old Norse hafre [oats].

In 1783, following corn riots in Halifax Corn Market, a special session – with Joshua Horton – proclaimed that

every penny oat-cake must weigh not less than 12 ounces when new baked, and not less than 8 ounces when dry; every penny loaf of wheaten bread [marked with a W] not less than 7 ounces, and every penny loaf of household bread [marked with an H] not less then 9 ounces

The bread was often given as a snack in pubs for the customers to dip into their beer.

See Havercake Lads and Thomas Spencer

Havercake Lads
The name goes back to the Civil War when Geoffrey Bosvile of Gunthwaite House raised a regiment of 1,000 men from the West Riding.

Later, it was a popular name given to the 33rd Regiment of Foot – then the 1st Yorkshire West Riding Regiment – because of a tradition from 1782 in which one of the recruiting sergeants carried a havercake on his bayonet or his sword at recruiting parades. The cake symbolised the fact that military life ensured food which had become scarce during the Napoleonic Wars. A recruit received a bounty of 10 guineas if he enlisted for 10 years, or 16 guineas if he enlisted for life.

Many of the recruits came from Sowerby.

See John Scholefield

Haviour & Robinson
Cabinet makers at Brighouse.

Partners included Mr Haviour and Mr Robinsons.

The partnership was dissolved in May 1891

Haw & Barker
Furnishers and retailers of carpets, linoleum, curtains and fabrics at 14 Bull Green, Halifax. Recorded in 1937.

The firm closed in 19??

Haw, Rev W. R.
[19??-19??] He was curate at Willesden Green, London before becoming Vicar of Saint Paul's Church, Queens Road [1949]

The Hawden family of Soyland

Hawden Hall Holiday Camp & Tea Gardens
Leisure facility opened by William Holt at Hawden Hole, Hardcastle Crags in 1919.

Billy had just returned from a spell in hospital during World War II. He bought the property for £80.

The rates were between 1/- and 1/6d per night

The ideal holiday for the sensible man or woman ...

... bracing air, woodland and moorland scenery

He sold the business for £300

Hawden Hole, Hebden Bridge
There are 2 cottages and a barn here.

It was the scene of the Hardcastle Crags Murder [1817].

In 1919, it was in a parlous state when William Holt bought the property for £80 and established Hawden Hall Holiday Camp & Tea Gardens

Hawkes, George H.
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the Lancashire Fusiliers.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hawkesley, George William
[18??-19??] Dyer at Greetland. He had business at the Greetland Dye Works and the Belle Isle Dye Works, Wakefield

In November 1893, Edmund Outram and his sisters Anne Ashworth and Elizabeth Outram were in bankruptcy litigation after they contracted to sell Upper Ellistones, Greetland to Hawkesley.

In 1902, he acquired the property which – the documents record – had formerly been occupied by Martha Outram.

See Hawkesley, Wild & Company

Hawkesley, Wild & Company
Dyers at Greetland Dye Works. Recorded on 16th November 1894 when around 150 of their workers were on strike.

See George William Hawkesley

Hawkestone Slack
Area of Stansfield. Mentioned in the Nomina Villarum [1865]

Hawkhead Bray & Son Limited
Coppersmiths at Phoebe Lane Mills [1937]

Hawkins & Tipson Group
A large UK rope-making group. They acquired the business of Royston's [1961] and Bates & Nortcliffe [1962]

Hawkins, Evon Highway
[1887-1956] In 1910, he married Maggie, daughter of Solomon Marshall.

Children: Margaret Elizabeth [1912-1913] born in Rotherham & died in Halifax.

He died in Liverpool [Q4 1956]

Hawkins, Henry
[1846-1921] Born in Taunton.

He was a gas engineer.

On 27th January 1867, he married Esther White [1847-1887] in Taunton.

Children: (1) Frank Harry [1869-1939] who married [1896] Catherine Calastical Holland and died in Massachusetts, USA; (2) Howard Edward Greaves [1870-1935]; (3) Ernest James Samuel [1872-1941] who married [1896] Annie Preston; (4) Frederick Charles Burgh [b 1875]; (5) Louise Pauline Mabel [1876-1954] who married [1900] Rupert Clarkson; (6) Rosa Florence May [1878-1967] who married [1899] William Albert Astin; (7) John Baker [b 1880] who married [1904] Jessie Griffiths; (8) Gilbert Henry [1881-1953] who married [1904] Mary Alice Southwell; (9) Esther Maud [b 1883]; (10) Hilda Maria Jane [b 1885].

He lived at Leeming Hall, Todmorden [1900].

Henry died in Limerick [1921]

Hawkins, Rev Thomas
[1760-1850] From Aylesbury. Minister at Warley Congregational Church [1796].

He was instrumental in building the Chapel of 1805, travelling to many of the large towns in England, seeking contributions. He raised £187.

He resigned in 1823 but continued to live in the district.

He lived at Warley Cottage [1796]; Old Hall Farm, Warley; Warley Manse which was built for him [1840].

He published some of his sermons: The Iniquity of Witchcraft [1808]

Hawkridge, Lawson
[1807-1875] Born in Skircoat.

He was a joiner [1829, 1860, 1841]; a joiner employing 1 boy [1851]; a joiner & inn keeper at the Elephant & Castle, Halifax [1861]; a joiner & licensed victualler at the Elephant & Castle, Halifax [1871]; landlord of the Elephant & Castle, Halifax [1874].

In 1829, he married Sarah Hodgson [1811-1876] of Northowram, at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) John [b 1832] who was a cardmaker's apprentice [1851], a cardmaker [1876]; (2) Jane [1836-1914] who was a pupil teacher [1851] and who married John Edwin Turner; (3) William [b 1839] who was an errand boy [1851]; (4) George [b 1840] who was a tea dealer [1861]; (5) James [b 1843]; (6) Henry Hodgson [b 1850] who was a mechanic [1871]

The family lived at Cavalry Field, Halifax [1841]; Hopwood Lane, Halifax [1851]; Salterhebble, Skircoat [1861].

Probate records show that Lawson left an estate valued at under £450. Probate was granted to Sarah, his widow

Probate records show that Sarah left an estate valued at under £450. Probate was granted to her son John

Hawks Cliff, Norland

Owners and tenants have included

Hawks Clough Bridge, Hebden Bridge
Late 18th century bridge allowing access to the Rochdale Canal over the Calder

Hawks Stones, Todmorden
Aka Hawkstones. Natural rock outcrop above Todmorden. Watson mistakenly associated these with the Druids

Hawksclough
Area north-west of Mytholmroyd

Hawksclough Bridge, Mytholmroyd
Bridge over the Calder to Hawksclough Manor. It was privately-owned by the manor. The bridge may have been built in 1735 when the manor was extended. Gives access to the Rochdale Canal

Hawksclough Co-operative Society
The Hawksclough branch of the Hebden Bridge Co-operative Society opened on 6th June 1926

Hawksclough Farm, Mytholmroyd
Later name of Hawksclough Manor, Mytholmroyd

Hawksclough Manor, Mytholmroyd
Aka Hawksclough Farm. House dated GIG 1731. The house was extended in 1735.

See Hawksclough Bridge, Mytholmroyd

Hawksclough Working Men's Club & Institute
Mytholmroyd.

Recorded in 1893, when John William Sutcliffe was secretary

Hawkstones Farm, Todmorden
West Kebs Road. Mid 19th century laithe-house

Hawksworth, Walter
Walter Ramsden, son of Thomas Ramsden, took his mother's maiden name and changed his name to Hawksworth

Hawksworth, Walter Ramsden
[17??-17??] Son of Walter Hawksworth.

He inherited property at Farnley and took the name of Fawkes:

See Walter Fawkes

Hawkyard & Smithies
Colliery owners at Dickey Steel, Elland [1874]

Hawkyard, Henry
[1801-1885] Born in Elland.

He was a joiner & employer.

On 20th March 1831, he married Jane Dalton [1812-1841] at Elland Parish Church.

Children: William

Hawkyard, James
[1866-1922] Son of William Hawkyard.

Born in Elland [10th August 1866].

On 12th September 1894, he married Eliza Thompson Smith [1866-1938] from Elland, in Elland

Children: (1) William Harold [1897-1965]; (2) Henry [1899-1926]; (3) Ernest [1907-1978].

James died in Elland [16th January 1922]

Hawkyard, Thomas
[1806-1886] Born in Elland.

He was a joiner [1831].

On 28th July 1831, he married Harriet Brearley [1809-1892], from Elland, in Elland.

Children: Alice [1848-1940] who married Thomas Fidler

Hawkyard, William
[1832-1912] Son of Henry Hawkyard.

Born in Elland.

He was a fireclay goods and brick manufacturers at Victoria Fire Clay Works, Elland [1905].

On 18th February 1860, he married Frances Culpan [1836-1916] in Halifax.


Frances was born in Cleckheaton
 

Children: (1) Henry [1860-1878]; (2) Ann [1864-1866]; (3) James; (4) Herbert Dalton [1867-1877]; (5) Clara [1869-1877].

William died in Elland [1st June 1912].

Frances died in Elland [29th February 1916]

Haworth
Other forms of the surname include Hayworth, Howarth and Howorth

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently only around 8 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Haworth. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Haworth's: A. Haworth & Sons
Tool manufacturers at West End Iron Works, Sowerby Bridge. Partners included General Haworth and J. Haworth

Haworth, Mrs Alice
[15??-16??] Aka Hawarth. She established Haworth's Gift

Haworth Edge
Mentioned in the Nomina Villarum [1865] as being a place in the Parish of Halifax, although its precise location is not indicated

Haworth, General
[18??-19??] Partner in Haworth & Sons.

He lived at Park Avenue, Nelson Street, Sowerby Bridge [1905]

Haworth's Gift
In her will of 1622, Alice Haworth bequeathed a sum of £20 per annum from the rents of property known as Parkinson's Houses, Halifax. This was to be distributed to the aged and impotent poor of Halifax

Haworth Hall, Pecket Well
Aka Gibraltar Farm, Gib. Early 17th century house

Haworth, J.
[18??-19??] Partner in A. Haworth & Sons.

He lived at Woodbine Cottages, Washer Lane [1905]

Haworth, John
[17??-18??] Cotton spinner and tenant of Oldroyd Mill, Langfield [1794]. He went into partnership with James Hollinrake and Thomas Knowles as cotton spinners at the mill. The partnership bought the mill from Robert Atkinson. They also carried out worsted spinning at Lob Mill. The partnership evolved into Ingham, Hollinrake & Company.

Between 1805 and 1820, John was a cotton spinner at Cinderhills Mill, Stansfield

Haworth, John
[1852-1938] Born in Thornton.

He was a woollen merchant [1901].

In 1891, he married Sarah Jane Grayson [1865-19??] from Sheffield, in Sheffield.

Children: (1) Mary J. [b 1893]; (2) Duncan [b 1894]; (3) Ronald George [b 1898].

The family lived at 13 Balmoral Place, Halifax [1901]

Haworth, Michael
[1???-1???] His name is inscribed above a water spout at Lower Cockcroft Hall, Rishworth

Haworth to Hebden Bridge Walk
A signposted route for walkers between Hebden Bridge and the Brontë family sites at Haworth.

See Brontë Way

Haworth to Heptonstall road
The old road from Heptonstall to Haworth crosses the New Bridge, Midgehole before going up and across the moors

Haworth, William
[1???-1???] Partner in Firth, Howarth & Firth

Haworth, William
[15??-1556] Cutler of Halifax.

He was executed for the murder of Rev Robert Holdsworth, Vicar of Halifax

Haws, T.
[1???-19??] Manager of the billiards hall at the Arcade Royale. He appeared in local advertisements during the 1920s

Haxby & Company Limited
Ironfounders. Partners included Moses Haxby. They had business at Spring Hall Lane, Halifax [1907]

Haxby, Moses
[18??-19??] Partner in Haxby & Company Limited.

He lived at 12 Reservoir Road, Halifax [1905]

Hay, C.
[18??-19??] Boot dealer at Halifax.

In March 1871, he was declared bankrupt

Hay, Hiram
[17??-18??] Around 1805, he took over Cockden Mill, Stansfield. In 1808, he assigned the mill to trustees

Hay, Rev I. G.
[1???-1???] He was rector of Saint Andrew's, Brechin before becoming Assistant Chaplain at Holy Trinity Senior School

Hay, Jeremy
[16??-16??] Or Hey. Curate at Heptonstall [1663-1667]

Hay, Sarah
[1???-18??] She ran a private school in Halifax [around 1835]

Hay, William
[18??-18??] He married Marianne Irving in Halifax [Q1 1839]


Marianne was the daughter of
Thomas Irving
 

Haydon & Elwell
See Aydon & Elwell

Haye, Esaias
[1861-19??] Born in Shipley.

He was a stone shipper (at stone wharf) [1911].

He married Unknown.

Children: Bertha [b 1892].

He was widowed by 1911.

The family lived at 11 Hardy Street, Brighouse

Hayes, G. E.
[18??-191?] Of Southowram.

He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on Southowram War Memorial

Hayes, William
[1883-1???] Born in Keighley.

In [Q2] 1907, he married Edith Scott at Saint Mary's Church, Keighley.


Edith was the daughter of
Walter Scott
 

Children: (1) Phillip [b 1908]; (2) Alice [b 1910].

The children were born in Keighley

Hayford, Dennis
[16??-1???] Curate at Rastrick [1676]

Hayles's: Henry Hayles
[18??-19??] Retailer of ladies' and gents' rainproof and waterproof coats
The Waterproofer

at 22 Commercial Street, Halifax [1916].

William Marshall was Manager [1916, 1924]

Hayley & Wadsworth
Cotton spinners and doublers at Spring Mill, Rishworth [1905]. Partners included Henry Wadsworth

Hayley, John
[17??-18??] Hatter in Northowram [1798]

Hayley, Richard
[1649-1720] He was a shear grinder at Northowram [1709].

He married Unknown [16??-1709] – (possibly) Elizabeth.

Children: (1) Richard [1682-1751]; (2) (possibly) John [1690-1754].

Members of the family were buried in Halifax Parish Church

Hayley, Thomas
[16??-17??] He was a shear grinder at Lee Bridge [1738].

He married Rachel [1686-1751].

Children: (1) Richard [1710-1738]; (2) George [1714-1739]; (3) Thomas [1716-1764].

Members of the family were buried in Halifax Parish Church

Hayne, Rev Richard
[18??-18??] DD.

Recorded in 1861 living at Stoney Royd, Halifax

Hayne, Rev Thomas
[1794-18??] Born in Ashbourne, Derbyshire.

He was Curate-in-Charge of Brighouse [July 1833-1838]; Vicar of Rastrick [1838, 1841].

He married Louisa [1796-18??] from Ashbourne, Derbyshire.

Children: (1) Frances L. [b 1819]; (2) Theresa [b 1824]; (3) Louisa [b 1830]; (4) Alfred Thwaites [1831-1857] who became curate at Long Ashton, Somerset and died at Rastrick parsonage; (5) Charles Irton [b 1833].

The family lived at Castle Hill House, Rastrick [1832]; Rastrick Vicarage [1841]

The Haynes
Aka The Haines, Folly Hall, Godley. The house stood on the Halifax side of Beacon Hill. Owners and tenants have included

In 1871, the estate was sold to Halifax Corporation

The Haynes
Aka The Haines. A popular name for Beacon Hill in the 18th century

Haynes, M. T. A.
[19??-19??] Curate at Hebden Bridge [1962]

Hays, James
[1836-1882] Born in Cleckheaton.

He was a worsted spinner [1871]; worsted spinner employing 100 persons [1881]; at Prospect Mill, Ovenden [1882].

In 1860, he married Mary Ann Sutcliffe [1840-1910] from Ovenden.

Children: (1) Sutcliffe [b 1865]; (2) Greenwood [b 1868]; (3) Annie [b 1870]; (4) Wilson [b 1872]; (5) Polly [b 1877]; (6) Wright [b 1881].

The family lived at 4 Prospect Row, Ovenden [1871]; Prospect House, Ovenden [1881]; 6 Moor Lane, Ovenden [1891]; 1 Moor Lane Top, Ovenden [1901].

An obituary recorded that

He was a kind and considerate employer and his relations with his workpeople were always of the most satisfactory character.

He was a churchwarden at Illingworth Church.

The body was placed in a shell, enclosed in a massive coffin of Pitch Pine, panelled, with heavy ornamental brass mountings

He was buried at Illingworth Church [3rd February 1882]

Haystead, James
[18??-1???] Landlord of the Football Inn Beerhouse, Brighouse [1890].

In June 1890, he was fined £1 plus 18/6d costs, and had his licence endorsed, for permitting drunkenness on the premises

Hayward, Rev G. A.
[18??-18??] Curate at Parish Church of Saint Martin, Brighouse [1852]

Hayworth
A variant of the surname Haworth

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Hazeldene, Elland
See Overgate Hospice

Hazelgreave Farm, Todmorden
Owners and tenants have included

Hazelroyd, Halifax
31/33 Savile Park Road

The property is now [2014] a nursing home

Hazeltine, Herbert
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the Lancashire Fusiliers.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hazeltine, James W.
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the Lancashire Fusiliers.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hazelwood, Halifax
Heath Road / Free School Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

There is a housing development – known as Hazelwood Court – in the former garden of the house [2011]

Hazelwood, Hebden Bridge
Birchcliffe Road / Sandygate.

The house is now 2 dwellings.

Owners and tenants have included

Hazlehurst Close, Shibden
In 1479, land here was given to Richard Bairstow by William Sunderland and others for use of the town of Northowram. The rent for the land was given for keeping a bull for use by the people of Northowram.

See Hazlehurst

Hazlehurst Clough, Shibden
A small valley off Shibden Valley

Hazlehurst Hall, Ambler Thorn
Aka Upper Hazlehurst.

This is discussed in Ancient Halls in & about Halifax

Hazlehurst, Shibden
Aka Upper Hazlehurst

Hazlerigg, Roger Greville
[1877-1952] Son of William Greville Hazlerigg.

Born at Sculcoates.

In 1901, he was living with his uncle Major Arthur Hancock Edwards at Pye Nest House, Halifax [1901].

He died at Chichester

Hazlerigg, William Greville
[1847-1893] He was vicar of Billesden [1881].

In 1876, he married Barbara Mary Pease in Sculcoates.


Barbara Mary was the daughter of
Colonel Joseph Walker Pease
 

Children: Roger Greville.

He died at Uppingham [1893].

Barbara Mary died 21st February 1911

HBoS
Abbr: Halifax Bank of Scotland

Head, Crossley
[1854-1930] He lived at Ivy House, Midgehole. He was manager of Crimsworth Water Dye Works.

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £6,337

Head House, Luddenden Dean
A cottage in the grounds of Castle Carr. Methodists held their meeting here before moving to Catherine House Farm and then Luddenden Dean Wesleyan Chapel

Head, John
[18??-19??] He lived at Alangate, Halifax [1905]

Head Spring, Barkisland
(Possibly) an early name for Holden House, Barkisland

Headen, John Henry
[1862-1934] Son of Esther [née Tarran] [1833-1???] and John Headon [1828-1???], a fustian dresser.

Born in Salford, Lancashire.

He was a mechanic [1888]; a machine tool fitter [1891]; a tool fitter [1901].

In 1887, he married Edna Ann Bentley [1865-1???] from Cleckheaton, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Clara [1888-1976] who was a milliner's errand girl [1917] and married George Henry Hogg; (2) Clement [1891-1892]; (3) Harry [1894] who died aged 1 month; (4) Hilda [1896] who died aged 3 months.

The family lived at 22 Johnson Street, Halifax [1891]; 25 Bell Hall Terrace, Halifax [1901]; 20 Eldroth Road, King Cross, Halifax [1917]

Heal, George Henry James
[1826-1914] Son of Ann and James Heal [1793-18??].

Born in Barnstaple, Devon.

Baptised at Barnstaple [16th April 1826].

He was a cotton spinner at Wheatley; a cotton manufacturer [1871]; a cotton spinner employing 43 men, 24 women and 19 children [1881]; a commission salesman [1901].

In August 1867, he was charged on 21 counts under the Factory Act, of working his hands after 6:00 pm. He was fined £2 each in 10 cases, and 11 cases were withdrawn.

In 1852, he married Kitty Martin [1830-1902] from Bath, at Shepton Mallet, Somerset.

Children: (1) James Hardy; (2) Ellen Henrietta [1858-1861]; (3) George Henry [b 1862]; (4) Henrietta Ellen [b 1864] who married Harry Lobley; (5) Willie [b 1866]; (6) John Albert [b 1868]; (7) Kate Louisa [b 1872] who was a milliner [1901] and married [1903] Lewis Crabtree or Walter Thomas Smith.

In 1861, George was living at Quay, Ilfracombe, with his unmarried sister Hannah, a shell shop keeper, and his widowed father James, a shell shop owner.

The family lived at Box Trees House, Ovenden [1871, 1881]

See William & Alfred Camm

Heal, James
[18??-19??] Established James H. Heal & Company [1872].

In 1886, he applied for a patent for

improvements in the manufacture of embossed fabrics

Heal's: James H. Heal & Company
Oil and tallow merchants for the textile trade and mill furnishers established by James Heal in Halifax in 1872.

They went on to develop and produce equipment for testing fibres and textiles.

They were at Box Trees Mill, Wheatley [1886], and at Old Cock Yard, Halifax [1905].

They are [2014] at Boothtown in the premises formerly occupied by Hoffman's Engineering

Heal, James Hardy
[1856-1???] Son of George Henry James Heal

Heald Moor
Above Todmorden. The Calder rises here

Heald, Rev Thomas
[1661-1734] MA.

Son of William Heald. He was educated at Jesus College Cambridge. He was ordained in 1694/5. He was Vicar of Huddersfield [1696]. He was Master of Hipperholme Grammar School [1683-1697].

The Heald family owned Cinderhills and Sowood House in the Hipperholme district.

In 1693, he married (1) Mrs Elizabeth Hough [d 1713].

Children: (1) Whiteley; (2) Thomas.

Elizabeth died suddenly on

May 24 [1713], being Lords Day had bin at Church & heard her Husband preach both ends of the Day

In 1717, he married (2) Mrs Walker

Heald, Whitley
[1694-1736] Son of Rev Thomas Heald. He was educated at Wakefield and at Oxford. He was ordained in 1719, and served at North Stoke, Oxfordshire and Saint George's, Southwark.

On 22nd February 1735/6, he was preaching at Saint Nicholas's, Cole Abbey, London when he suddenly

fell down in the pulpit and died

Heald, William
[16??-1684] He was Curate at Lightcliffe [1654].

Heywood includes him in his list of the great number of wretched drunken preachers at Lightcliffe.

He left to become Vicar of Donaghadee, Ireland.

He married a daughter of John Whitley of Rookes.

Children: (1) Grace [1655-1685] who married Francis Priestley; (2) Thomas; (3) Jeremy [1663-1685].

He was buried at Halifax Parish Church

Heale, Booth & Company
Cotton manufacturers at Lower Lumb Mill, Mill Bank. They occupied the mill on 15th October 1864 when it burnt down

Healey, Alice Oldfield
[1883-1908] Daughter of Henry Healey.

She married Brigadier General Richard Edgar Sugden.

She had a skating accident during their honeymoon in Paris. She fell heavily and an internal injury turned to peritonitis.

She died on 20th January 1908.

Her funeral took place at Park Wood, Elland.

She was buried at Brighouse Cemetery

Healey & Healey
Wire manufacturers established by brothers Henry and George Healey. In 1888, the partnership was dissolved and Henry carried on alone

Healey, Francis
[1835-1910] Son of Thomas Healey and younger brother of Thomas Henry.

After their father's death, the brothers continued their architectural practice, working on churches, including Saint Michael's Church, Mytholmroyd

Healey, Frank
[1???-19??] Confectioner. He had business at 28 Arcade Royale and 15 Vine Terrace, Halifax [1936]

Healey, George
[1815-19??] Born in Middlesex, his family came to Brighouse when he was 10 years old.

He was apprenticed to James Woods & Brothers at Grove Mills, Brighouse. In 1885, he acquired the business.

He was unsuccessful in the Brighouse Municipal Elections of 1893. He later represented the Central Ward in Brighouse and served on several committees. He was active in local affairs – such Gas, Parks and Sanitation – and at Bethel Methodist New Connexion Church and Sunday School.

He lived at 14 High Street, Brighouse [1908].

He went into business with his brother Henry Healey and Ralph Brearley as Healey & Healey. In 1880, the partnership was dissolved and Henry carried on alone

See George Healey & Sons

Healey's: George Healey & Sons
Wire manufacturer established by George Healey, Henry Healey and Ralph Brearley at Grove Mills, Brighouse and Little John Mill. In 1880, the partnership was dissolved and George Healey carried on at Brighouse Low Mills.

In 1966, Royston's acquired the business

Healey, Henry
[1852-19??] Born at Thornhill.

Brother of George Healey and partner in their wire drawing business, Healey & Healey.

In 1888, the partnership was dissolved and Henry carried on business alone at Wilkin Royd Mill, Brighouse.

In 1891, he occupied the lower part of Wilkin Royd Mill, Brighouse.

In 1906, he occupied part of Livingston Wire Mill, Brighouse. In 1923, he was listed at the mill as

staple and rivet maker, shuttle hoops and pins, cut wires any length, bailing wire for all purposes.

Telegraphic address: Staples, Brighouse

He was associated with Bethel Chapel, Brighouse and the local temperance societies.

In 1876, he married Eliza Oldfield Stocks in Huddersfield.


Eliza was the daughter of Mr Stocks
 

Children: Frank [b 1877] who was a manufacturer [1926], Gladys [b 1879], and Alice.

The family lived at Newlands, Rastrick.

He died 27th July 1926.

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £25,484 1/-. Probate was granted to son Frank and Gladys Goldthorp (widow) 

Healey's Household Requirements
The business was in a building on the south-west corner of the junction of Northgate and Broad Street. The building became unsafe and was demolished in 1971

Healey, John
[1???-19??] JP.

He was Mayor of Todmorden [1932-1933]

Healey, Joseph
[17??-1851] An old pensioner, he lived alone
in a low, miserable hovel, without anybody to take care of him

at Castle Hill Side, Halifax [??].

In January 1851, after getting drunk at Almondbury, he returned home and fell asleep by the fire. During the night, his clothes caught fire and smouldered away. The neighbours found his body next morning, his clothes still burning and the flesh burned off his legs

Healey, Thomas
[1???-18??] He was an architect who, with James Mallinson, made up the Mallinson & Healey practice who designed the Parish Church of Saint Thomas the Apostle, Heptonstall.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Thomas Henry; (2) Francis

Healey, Thomas Edward
[1890-1960] Licensee of the White Swan Inn, Brighouse, the New Talbot Hotel, Halifax from 1930, and the White Horse Hotel, Halifax from 1938 until his death.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Harold; (2) Brenda

Healey, Thomas Henry
[1839-1910] Son of Thomas Healey and elder brother of Francis. He trained in the Mallinson & Healey practice. After their father's death, the brothers continued their practice – working on churches – until Francis's death in 1910. Much of their work is in Bradford and Shipley

Healey, William
[1???-1???] Of Fern House, Rastrick. He was a wire manufacturer. He was elected Councillor in the Brighouse Municipal Elections of 1893

Healey Wood House, Rastrick

Owners and tenants have included

Healey Wood, Rastrick
Woodland. Originally Hilly Wood

The Health Food Stores, Halifax
Retailers of health foods, appliances and literature at 33 King Cross, Halifax – just below Queens Road [1907]

Heap
[Surname]

There are currently around 29 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Heap. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Heap & Ashworth
Manufacturers at Frostholme Mill, Cornholme, and Calder Vale Mill, Cornholme.

Partners included James Heap, Joshua Henry Wilson, John Heap, Grace Heap, and James Ashworth.

In 1880, local mills were suffering a depression and the firm acceded to their workers' demands for an advance on their wages.

The partnership was dissolved in November 1883. By this time, John Heap had died

Heap & Noble
Silk dressers at Brighouse. The partnership was dissolved in 1856.

See Noble's Silk Mill, Brighouse

Heap, David
[18??-18??] Printer, bookseller, bookbinder, stationer and general newspaper agent at Hebden Bridge [1861]

Heap, David
[1835-1884] Postmaster. Hebden Bridge Post Office were at his premises [April 1877]

Heap, Eli
[18??-1???] Of Brighouse.

He married Fanny Swaine [18??-1???].

Children: Mary [1886-1961] who married Fred Lumb

Heap, Rev Fred E.
[18??-19??] Or Heape. Minister at Sowerby New Road Primitive Methodist Chapel [1902, 1905]

Heap, Harry
[1860-1897] Son of James Heap.

He was a butcher [1881]; inn keeper at the Clifton Arms, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire [1891]; landlord of the Black Bull, Heptonstall [1897].

On 21st March 1887, he married Sarah Jane Frances Allen [1861-1900] from Gargrave, Yorkshire, at Saint Peter's, Burnley, Lancashire

They had no children.

The family lived at Hole in the Wall, Hebden Bridge [1881]; Habergham Eaves, Lancashire [1891]

He died at the Black Bull, Heptonstall [6th May 1897].

He was buried at Heptonstall Church [16 May 1897]

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £123. Probate was granted to his widow

Sarah Jane Frances died at the Black Bull, Heptonstall [19th October 1900].

Probate records show that she left effects valued at £119 10/- to Joseph Allen (draughtsman) 

Heap, Rev Henry
[17??-1839] A native of Langfield. He was trained for the ministry by Rev John Crosse and Rev Samuel Knight. He became vicar of Bradford

He died 17th January 1839

Heap, Henry
[1814-1856] Born in Sowerby.

He was a cotton spinner [1841]; licensed victualler at the Hole in the Wall, Hebden Bridge [1845, 1851].

On 22nd February 1835, he married Sarah / Sally Dawson [1818-1874] at Halifax Parish Church.


Sarah was born in Erringden
 

Children: (1) Hannah [1835-1895]; (2) James; (3) William [b 1845]; (4) John [1848-1919]; (5) Grace [1857-1929].

The family lived at Green Springs, Stansfield [1841].

He died at the Hole in the Wall [November 1856].

He was buried at Heptonstall Church [28th November 1856].

After his death, Sally married Abraham Crabtree

Heap, Herbert
[1870-19??] Born in Sowerby.

He was a licensed victualler at the Sportsman, Cragg Vale [1911].

A Herbert Heap was landlord of the Odessa House, Soyland [1905], the Cunning Corner, Rishworth [1917], and the Old Bridge, Ripponden [1940].

It is not yet ascertained whether these were the same man.

In [Q1] 1897, he married Emily Haley [1875-19??] from Sowerby Bridge.

Children: (1) Edith [b 1898]; (2) Frances [b 1905]

Heap, James
[1747-1804] Landlord of the Bull's Head, Sowerby.

He married Sarah [1749-1801].

The couple were buried at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby with inscriptions on William Drake's tomb

Heap, James
[18??-1???] He was a fustian dealer [1885]; a flock dealer [1888].

He married Unknown.

Children: Roger

Heap, James
[1838-1912] Son of Henry Heap.

Born in Stansfield.

He was an apprentice joiner [1851]; a joiner & victualler at the Hole in the Wall, Hebden Bridge [1861]; licensed victualler at the Hole in the Wall, Hebden Bridge [1864, 1871, 1881, 1891]; Well Holes farm, Stansfield. Farmer [1901]; Knowle Top, Heptonstall. Retired Publican [1911].

On 26th June 1860, he married Susannah Parker [1840-1907] at Halifax Parish Church.


Susannah was born in Heptonstall
 

Children: (1) Harry [1860-1897] who was a butcher [1881]; (2) William; (3) Sarah [b 1864] who was a clothier's machinist [1881]; (4) Sam [1866-1895]; (5) Annie [1869-1941]; (6) Emma [1869-1945]; (7) Ada [b 1877].

The family lived at the Hole in the Wall, Hebden Bridge; Well Holes Farm, Stansfield [1901]; Knowle Top, Heptonstall [1911]

Heap, John
[17??-1???] Coiner of Lod, Westfield

Heap, Rev John
[17??-18??] Of Todmorden

On 28th July 1823, he, Rev Joshua Fearnside, Rev Jagger, Rev John James, Rev Edward B. Lloyd, Rev Zachariah Yewdall, Rev Matthew Lumb and Stephen Wilson of Holmfirth, were amongst the passengers travelling by The Fleece coach from Halifax to Sheffield which overturned near Shepley. Rev Sergeant of Scarborough died of his injuries. Edward Smith, the driver of the coach was accused of

wanton behaviour and shameful perversity, on account of the peril to which his furious driving subjected his passengers.

Rev Heap received several contusions on the head

Heap, John
[1835-1880] A married man of Cornholme.

On 14th August 1880, he was found hanging in the attic at his home. He was said have been

in a desponding state of mind for some time

Heap, John Turley
[17??-1???] Coiner of Westfield

Heap, Joseph
[1822-1899] Son of cloth miller Thomas Heap.

Born in Norland.

He was a cloth miller or fuller [1851]; a woollen fuller [1861]; a cloth fuller [1871]; a woollen finisher living at the Albion Inn, Norland [1881]; a cloth fuller [1891].

In 1846, he married Elizabeth Greenwood [1825-1???] at Elland Parish Church.


Elizabeth, from Warley, was the daughter of weaver Isaac Greenwood
 

Children: (1) Thomas [b 1847] who was a woollen fuller [1861]; (2) Mary Ann [1850-1928] who married James Robert Berry; (3) Emma [b 1854]; (4) Arthur [b 1857]; (5) Martha Elizabeth [b 1860]; (6) Annie [b 1866] who was a velvet ender [1891].

The family lived at 1 West Street, Sowerby Bridge [1851]; Old House Mill, Wood Nook, Norland [1861]; Scar Head, Norland [1871]; Albion Inn Public House, Norland [1881]; Scar, Norland [1891].

Living with them in 1881 were lodgers Samuel Hollas [aged 73] (widower, dyer's labourer wool), Mary Hollas [aged 74] (worsted spinner) and Hannah Hollas [aged 9].

He died 12th April 1899

Heap, Maurice Fleming
[18??-1917] Son of Mrs S. Rawnsley of Clough Head, Norland.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 32nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers.

He died 6th August 1917.

He was buried at the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery [XVII D 4A].

He is remembered on Norland War Memorial

Heap, Mr
[17??-1827] He married Rachael.


Question: Does anyone know anything about the man or his life in the Army?

 

He was a soldier, went to war and was presumed dead.

Rachel married Samuel Lumb.

Heap was not dead and returned to find his wife remarried.

Heap sold his wife to her new husband, and delivered her to Lumb in a halter at Halifax Cross.

Heap died in 1827.

On 1st October 1827, at the age of 83, Lumb married Rachael for a second time at Halifax Parish Church.

See Wife selling

Heap, Naylor & Company
Stone merchants at Southowram.

Partners included William Heap and Samuel Naylor.

The partnership was dissolved in January 1860

See Heap, Naylor & Goodyear and Naylor & Goodyear

Heap, Naylor & Goodyear
Stone merchants [Yorkshire paving] at Southowram Partners included William Heap, Samuel Naylor, and Mr Goodyear.

See Heap, Naylor & Company and Naylor & Goodyear

Heap, Roger
[1842-1???] Son of James Heap.

Born in Heptonstall.

He was a printer of Heptonstall [1865]; a printer & compositor [1871]; a letter press printer [1881]; a fish & potato merchant [1891]; a shoe maker [1901]; a fried fish dealer [1911].

In 1865, he married (1) Mary Elizabeth Avery [1844-1885] at Halifax Parish Church.


Mary Elizabeth of Erringden, was born in Stamford, Lincolnshire, the daughter of William Avery, servant
 

Children: (1) Mary A [b 1866] who was a tailoress [1881]; (2) Sarah E [b 1868] who was a tailoress machinist [1881]; (3) Maria Grace [b 1872]; (4) James W [b 1874] who was an iron moulder [1891]; (5) Joseph Avery [b 1876] who suffered a weak spine from childhood and was a tailor (woollen) [1891], a shoe maker [1901]; (6) Samuel Walton Heap.

Mary Elizabeth died ' (aged 40)  In 1888, he married (2) Elizabeth Hannah Cockcroft [1849-1???] at Heptonstall Church.


Elizabeth Hannah of Hebden Bridge, was the daughter of Thomas Cockroft, overlooker
 

The family lived at Hebden Bridge Lanes, Heptonstall [1871]; Bridge Lanes, Hebden Bridge [1881]; House & Shop, 86 & 88 Market Street, Hebden Bridge [1891]; 26 Parker Lane, Burnley [1901]; 6 Bank Foot, Hebden Bridge [1911].

Living with them in 1891 were nephew George Manton [aged 15] (fish cleaner) and niece Florence Amelia Manton [aged 11] (general domestic servant) 

Heap, Samuel
[18??-18??] Shopkeeper at Mytholmroyd. Around 1861, he ran a school in Mytholmroyd

Heap, Samuel Walton
[1883-1914] Son of Roger Heap

He enlisted in the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) [1901]. He served in the South African Campaign.

During World War I, he served as a Private.

In a letter home, he described how his group had been in a struggle for 4 days

which I shall not forget if I live 100 years

and how he had been wounded (in the groin, back and arm) in action [13th September 1914], and lay on the battlefield until the following morning.

He died from the wounds in hospital at Esbelon, France [27th September 1914].

He was buried at Bois-Guillaume Communal Cemetery [I A 16A]

Heap, Thomas
[18??-19??] Photographer.

He lived at Pinfold, Sowerby [1881-1901]

Heap, Thomas
[18??-19??] Chemist at Sowerby Bridge.

On 8th January 1902, he married Bertha Stansfield from Leeds, formerly of Sowerby Bridge

Heap, William
[1???-18??] He was one of the Trustees appointed under the Halifax Improvement Act [1823]. He established Heap's Charity

Heap, William
[1???-1866] A member of Halifax Town Council [1848-1851].

He died 19th March 1866

Heap, William
[18??-1???] He was landlord of the Northgate Hotel, Halifax [1890]; landlord of the Woolpack, Halifax [1891]

Heap, William
[18??-18??] Stone merchant and partner in Heap, Naylor & Company and Heap, Naylor & Goodyear.

He married Unknown.

His wife was the sister of his partner Samuel Naylor

Heap, William
[18??-18??] Of Sowerby.

He was a dyer [1832].

On 18th March 1832, he married Sarah Thorp of Sowerby, at Halifax Parish Church

Heap, William
[1863-1942] Son of James Heap.

Born in Hebden Bridge.

He was a tailor's apprentice [1881]; innkeeper at the Lord Nelson, Midgley [1891]; tailor & cornet player [1901]; a musician (brass band conductor) [1911].

In 10th March 1887, he married Mary Greenwood [1864-1956] at Saint Thomas the Apostle, Heptonstall.


Mary was born in Wadsworth
 

Children: (1) Verney [1889-1972] who was an insurance agent [1911]; (2) Edith [1891-1976] who was a typist in a solicitor's office [1911]; (3) Florrie [b 1894] who was a typist in a commercial office [1911]; (4) Haydn Greenwood [1897-1991].

He moved to Bradford and made a living as a Musician & Brass Band Conductor.

The family lived at 24 Westcroft Road, Bradford [1901]; 5 Dracup Road, Great Horton, Bradford [1911].

He died in Bradford

Heap's: William Heap Charity
Halifax. Established by William Heap

Heape's: Benjamin Heape & Company
Butter and bacon factors at Cheapside, Halifax [1850]

Heape, Rev F. E.
[18??-19??] Recorded in December 1902, when he conducted services at Sowerby New Road Primitive Methodist Chapel and Warley Clough Methodist Chapel, Sowerby

Heaps, James
[1809-1879] Son of Elizabeth [née Evans] and Richard Heaps.

Born in Shoreditch, London [20th February 1809].

Baptised at Saint Leonard's, Shoreditch.

On 15th February 1835, he married (1) Elizabeth Hartley [18??-1859] in Holborn, London.

Children: (1) Elizabeth [1837-1868]; (2) Jane [b 1840]; (3) Ann [1842-1868]; (4) Emma [b 1844]; (5) Emma [b 1845]; (6) William H [b 1847].

In 1841, he was a paperhanger, living at 17 Coldharbour Street, Bethnal Green.

In 1851, he was an agent for the Seamen's Friends and was visiting Huddersfield; his wife Elizabeth was still living in London.

Between 1855 and 1877, he officiated at 4951 interments at Lister Lane Cemetery, Halifax.

Elizabeth died on 20th January 1859.

In 1859, James gave a lecture and published a pamphlet titled Has a Man a Soul.

At this time, he was living in at 31 Rhodes Street, Halifax.

In 1860, he married (2) widow Mrs Nancy Smith (née Lund), born in Keighley. Nancy had 8 children.

In 1861, James was listed as a grocer and local Missionary living in Halifax.

James died on 21st February 1879, the day after his 70th Birthday.

James, his first wife Elizabeth and daughters Ann and Elizabeth were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 3883]

Nancy Heaps, her first husband John Smith, and 4 of their children were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 3968]

Heaps, W.
[18??-18??] A farm labourer.

He was charged with setting fire to the barn of Henry Hargreaves of Winterburn Hill, Warley.

On Saturday, 25th September 1858, the Magistrates heard that there had been quarrels between Heaps and Hargreaves over Heaps's intimacy with Hargreaves's wife. Heaps was committed for trial at York Assizes

The Hearse
This vehicle can be seen in the carriage collection in the barn at Shibden Hall. It was built around 1??? by Marstons of Birmingham

Hearst, William Randolph
[1???-19??] American newspaper magnate.

See Norland Hall

Heath Bank, Halifax
Owners and tenants have included

Heath, Rev Charles
[187?-18??] Curate at Elland [187?]

Heath, Charles
[1893-1966] A clog-dancer at Illingworth

Heath, Rev D.
[18??-19??] Minister at Bethesda Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Elland [1869]

Heath Farm, Halifax
Stood opposite Spring Hall, Halifax.

Owners and tenants have included

It is mentioned in the will of John Holdsworth [June 1855]

Heath Grammar School: Grace
The Latin grace said before school meals was written by Arthur Owen in the 1950s
Gratias maximas nos Tibi, Domine, propter haec et omnia Tua beneficia, agimus, qui, e favore Tuo, haec Tua dona iam sumpturi sumus. Hunc cibum oramus ut benedicas in usum nostrum, et nos in officium Tuum. Per Iesum Christum, Salvatorem nostrum

Heath Grammar School, Halifax

Heath Grammar School: Memorial Gates
The memorial gates - made by Wilfred Dowdson of Kirk Forge, Kirkbymoorside – were unveiled in June 1949 to commemorate 40 old boys of the School who were killed in action in World War II.

They carry the Latin motto

DIGNI ET VOS ESTE FAVORE

which was written by Arthur Owen and is a pun on the surname of Dr John Favour, founder of the School

Heath Grammar School: Seal
The seal of Heath Grammar School shows an open book with the Latin legend
Qui mihi discipulus puer es cupis atque

It was incorporated into the badge on the pupils' uniform cap and blazer

Heath Hall, Halifax
17th century mansion built by George Ramsden. The house stood near what is now Heath Park, Skircoat.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

In 1889, it was sold to Halifax Corporation. In 1890, it was demolished for the construction of Heath Road and the Heath Estate.

During the demolition, parts of a tombstone inscribed:

Here lyeth the body of Hannah, the daughter of John Elam of Halifax, who died the 7 of the first month 1594

were found in a chimney flue. Workers also found a series of cellars with well-built stone steps, and ceilings dated 1689 and 1722. These may indicate an earlier dwelling on or near the site. Other objects were found including pieces of old china, a horn-handled razor dated 1691, and coins of 1776 and 1793

Heath Hall, Norland
Clough Road. Aka Heath Hall Farm. Built around 1650.

Owners and tenants have included

Heath Nurseries, Halifax
The nurseries occupied a large area below Royal Halifax Infirmary and opposite Heath Grammar School.

Owners and tenants of the nurseries have included

They became the playing fields for Heath Grammar School.

Houses were built on the land in the 1990s

Heath Old Boys' Association
The Old Boys' Association for Heath Grammar School and Crossley-Heath School

Heath Park, Skircoat
Original name of Albert Park. It was renamed in April 1902 after the statue of Prince Albert was moved here.

See Heath Hall

Heath Post Office
Recorded in 1905 at 21 Manor Drive, Halifax

Heath Royd, Halifax
Francis Street. Owners and tenants have included

Heath Royd, Skircoat
Owners and tenants have included

Heath School House, Halifax
The house for the headmaster of Heath Grammar School was built in 1830

Heath Training & Development Centre, Halifax
Formerly Heath Grammar School.

The former classrooms and assembly hall are available for hire

Heath, Walter
[1818-1860] Of Halifax.

He was a carver and gilder [1844].

On 23rd September 1844, he married Julia Catherine Marchant [1822-1848] in Halifax.

Children: Louisa Marriott [1845-1917] who was a governess and never married.

Catherine died 15th February 1849.

Walter died 9th May 1860.

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 4569]; Julia Catherine [19th February 1848]; Walter [14th May 1860]; Louisa Marriott [30th June 1917]

Heatherlea, Halifax
Savile Park. Owners and tenants have included

Heatherlow, Todmorden
Owners and tenants have included

Heatherstone, Halifax
Princes Gate, Savile Park. House

Owners and tenants have included

It was demolished.

A nurses' homes built there

Heathfield House, Elland
Owners and tenants have included

Heathfield House, Halifax
Free School Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

Heathfield House, Rishworth
Members of the Wheelwright family lived/died here.

In 1950, the house was acquired by Rishworth School as a preparatory school, Heathfield Junior School, Rishworth.

This opened in 1952

Heathroyde Nursing Home, Halifax
Francis Street.

Recorded in 1928, when George Horsfall died here

Heathville, Halifax
Lower Shaw Hill.

Owners and tenants have included

Heathwood House, Shelf
The Heathwood House Tea Gardens were here

Heaton's: A. Heaton & Company (Valves)
Valve manufacturers of Bradford Road, Brighouse. This was associated with Hattersley (Ormskirk) Limited and became Hattersley Heaton

Heaton, Andrew
[1828-1894] Farmer at Siddal Wells [from 1871].

In 1847, he married Sarah Laycock [1830-19??] in Halifax.

Children: (1) Sarah who married James Ellis Knowles; (2) Robert [b 1859] who married [1882] Harriet Alderson and had 6 children [1901]; (3) child; (4) child; (5) child; (6) child; (7) child; (8) child; (9) child; (10) child; (11) child; (12) child.

The family lived at Siddal Wells [1871, 1881].

Living with Andrew, Sarah and 9 children in 1871 were son-in-law & daughter Frances & Leonard Hartwell.

Living with Andrew, Sarah and 4 children in 1891 were son-in-law & daughter James Ellis Knowles wife Sarah Knowles [née Heaton] and their son Wainwright [1891]

Living with the widowed Sarah in 1901 were son & daughter-in-law Robert & Harriet and their 6 children.

Jeffrey Knowles, his great-grandson writes

In 1894, at the age of 66, Andrew Heaton walked from his home at Siddal Wells to Elland, and then rode to Brighouse to pay his rent. He walked home up Brookfoot Hill to Southowram. It was raining, thundering and lightning at the time, and, feeling unwell, he called in at the Shoulder of Mutton for a drink. Having drunk just one whisky, he suddenly got up and went outside, crossed the road and collapsed banging his head on the kerb. On seeing this, one of the locals shouted
He's drunk, let him stop where he is, he's wet on the inside, let him be wet on the outside as well

No-one offered assistance except one young man named James Brown – also known as Fiddler Jim – and a lad, John Jowett, who carried him up the road to the stable of the Pack Horse Inn, wrapped him in a horse sheet and left him. James Brown was seeking work and had to be on his way, but he asked the lad to look in on him later. Some 3 hours later, the lad looked in at the stable and found Andrew quite dead. At the inquest, Anthony Bairstow landlord of the Shoulder of Mutton said the deceased was not drunk. He arrived at the pub tired, starved and nearly finished and had only one drink. Fred Baines landlord of the Pack Horse said that he did not know the deceased was in his stable, and John Jowett did not know the stable belonged to the Pack Horse Inn! Verdict: Accidental death due to a fall

Heaton, David
[1822-1901] Son of Isaac Heaton. He began teaching, like his father.

He succeeded John Noble as Brighouse postmaster. The Post Office at the time was in rooms at Mary Bedford's Charity School.

In 1866, he was appointed Brighouse rate collector, and he was succeeded by Emmanuel Dale

Heaton, Edith
[1884-19??] A cousin of Tom Oldfield.

She married Earl Lund

Heaton, Grace
[18??-19??] Lodging house keeper at Winding Road Lodging House, Halifax [November 1902]

Heaton, Isaac
[1787-1871] Born in Dewsbury. He came to Brighouse to take up the post of Headmaster of Mary Bedford's Charity School. He wrote a history of the school. He was the last master of the school.

His son, David, was born at the school.

See Heaton Street, Brighouse

Heaton, J. A.
[18??-1???] In 1874, he took over the soap making business of Faucon Rochette & Company. In 1894, the business was acquired by the Brighouse Soap Company Limited.

He lived at (possibly) Field Head, Lightcliffe which he bought for £3,000

Heaton, John
[17??-18??] He was 7 ft tall and a soldier in George III's army.

He married Unknown.

Children: William

Heaton, John
[17??-18??] Bookseller in Halifax.

He managed the bookselling business of John Binns.

He later bought the business from the Binns family

Heaton, John
[18??-1???] Son of William Heaton. At 6 ft 3 in, he was tall, like his grandfather, John Heaton

Heaton, John
[1869-1894] Chemist & druggist.

He lived at Gooder Lane, Brighouse [with his parents 1894].

He died from an overdose of prussic acid. He had been depressed, on account of ill-health, for some time

Heaton, John Thomas
[1866-19??] Born in Elland.

He was a woollen manufacturer [1901].

In 1888, he married Sarah Ann Fielding [1865-19??].

Children: (1) Hilda [b 1891]; (2) Emily [b 1893]; (3) Marion [b 1899].

The family lived at Owlet Hall, Elland [1901, 1905]

Heaton, Michael
[17??-18??] Of Robertshaw. Partner in George Widdop & Company

Heaton, Michael
[1751-1807] Gentleman of Heptonstall.

The will of William Greenwood [1790] passed property known as Robertshaw to Michael Heaton.

He died 18th August 1807 (aged 56).

He was buried at Heptonstall Church

Heaton, Michael
[1816-18??] He was a farmer of 32 acres Sunny Bank Farm, Southowram [1871]

Heaton, Nan
[17??-18??] She sold toffee at the Shelf Tide

Heaton, PC
[18??-18??] Brighouse constable [1860]

Heaton, Robert
[1859-1???] He was a farmer [1891].

In January 1882, he married Harriet, daughter of Thomas Alderson.

Children: (1) child; (2) child; (3) child; (4) child; (5) child.

The family lived at Backhold Royd, Siddal [1891]

Heaton, Samuel
[17??-17??] Hatter in Halifax [1775]

Heaton, Thomas
[1839-1887] Of Elland.

He was a highly-respected woollen manufacturer in Elland employing a large number of hands [1888].

Around 1884, Dr George Hoyle had diagnosed that he had poor circulation and might die suddenly. On 31st December 1887, he died very suddenly in a cab which was taking him to Halifax to see his solicitor. As they went up Salterhebble Hill, the cabman walked alongside the cab, talking to Heaton. He seemed in good health, but he was dead when the cabman opened the door at their destination

Heaton, William
[1???-18??] A manager at the Akroyd's Copley Mill for several years.

In November 1855, Edward and Henry Akroyd and the workpeople at the mill, erected a marble tablet in his memory at Saint Stephen's Church, Copley

Heaton, William
[1805-1871] Son of John Heaton.

Poet born in a cottage near Luddenden churchyard.

He went to dame school and Sunday school, and was largely self-taught. He learned to read by studying the head-stones in Luddenden churchyard.

He was a handloom carpet weaver; keeper at People's Park [1857-1867].

He became a well-known poet and wrote about the flora and fauna of the district. He wrote poetry with titles such as Wild Flowers Flowers of Calder Dale, Leaves from the forest dell, The old soldier, The wandering lover, and other poems [1858].

Some of his work was published by Roberts Leyland.

His autobiography gives details of the flora and fauna of the district.

He was an acquaintance of Branwell Brontë.

He married (1) Elizabeth [1805-1864].

Children: John.

He married (2) Mary [who died aged 65].

William and his wives were buried at Christ Church, Pellon

Heavy Woollen Aerodrome

See Clifton airport and Heavy Woollen District

Heavy Woollen District
The name given to the area around Batley and Dewsbury which was the centre of the recovered wool industry.

See Heavy Woollen Aerodrome and Yorkshire Heavy Woollen District Transport Company

Heavysege, Thomas
[17??-18??] He married Sarah.

Children: (1) Mary [1794-1874] who married Daniel Holgate Sugden; (2) Lydia [1795-1874] who married John Marsh

Hebble
The river flows south through Halifax to join the Calder at Brooksmouth

See Lower Coal Measures and Westphalian series

Hebble
A variant of the surname Hebblethwaite.

George Redmonds writes that John Hebell is recorded in Halifax in 1514.

Hebble Bridge, Ovenden
An area of Ovenden. Recorded in 1861, when there were several cotton and worsted mills in the area

Hebble Bridge, Wheatley
Crosses the Hebble Brook Wheatley to Pellon road at Brackenbed Lane

Hebble Brook
An alternative name for the river Hebble as it flows through Dean Clough.

The watercourse was also popularly known as Pig Beck.

The river crossing here has been achieved by the construction of North Bridge and, more recently, Burdock Way.

At the stone-laying ceremony for North Bridge, the stench from the Hebble Brook below was such that

the vicinity of the stone was liberally sprinkled with chloride of lime to counter the odour rising from the stream

See Halifax Ducking Stool, Farrar Mill Lane Aqueduct, Elevation of Halifax, Lee Brook, Waterside footpath and Wheatley Falls

Hebble Bus Company
Transport company formed by Oliver & Charles Holdsworth on 1st December 1924.

They provided local services, and services to Manchester, Leeds and Bradford. The buses operated from the Ward's End bus station where their buses were able to load and unload without plying for hire on the public highway, which was not approved of by Halifax Corporation, whose trams and buses they were competing with. The company had frequent disputes with Halifax Corporation who had their own rival bus and tram services. Later things settled down and they were able to operate from the streets.

The company employed non-Union labour and was unaffected by the General Strike of 1926.

In 1928, they took over Hugh Brigg of Wilsden and ran services to Bingley.

In 1929, they took over the Calder Bus Company.

On 2nd May 1929, the company was bought by the London, Midland & Scottish Railway.

In 1930, it became Hebble Motor Services Limited.

In the 1950s, they took over several smaller companies.

In the 1970s, after various mergers, they were absorbed into the West Riding Group and then the National Bus Company

See I. W. Holdsworth

Hebble End Bar, Hebden Bridge
A toll gate built in 1835. It was discontinued on 30th October 1878, and demolished soon afterwards

Hebble End Canal Bridge, Hebden Bridge
Bridge #18 over the Rochdale Canal

See Stubbing Lower Lock, Hebden Bridge and Stubbing Upper Lock, Hebden Bridge

Hebble End, Hebden Bridge
See Hebble End Canal Bridge, Hebble End Dye Works, Erringden, Hebble End Bar, Hebble End River Bridge, Neptune, Hebden Bridge, Stubbing Lower Lock, Hebden Bridge and Stubbing Upper Lock, Hebden Bridge

Hebble End River Bridge, Hebden Bridge
A single-arch stone bridge across the Calder at Hebble End on the road between Heptonstall and Erringden. In the 16th century, it was known as Litthouse Bridge.

In 1748, the bridge was carried away in a flood, and there was a dispute as to who should pay for the rebuilding. Heptonstall paid half of the costs, but Erringden refused to pay the other half, since Sowerby Ramble lay between it and the river. The West Riding eventually paid.

The present bridge is dated 1797.

It was widened in 1806

Hebble Hole Bridge, Colden
A stone slab bridge over Colden Water supported by a central stone pier. A part of the Pennine Way

Hebble House, Salterhebble
Owners and tenants have included

Hebble House, Wheatley
5 Hebble Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

Hebble Motor Services Limited
Transport company which evolved from O. & C. Holdsworth's Hebble Bus Company.

By 1958/59, there were no members of the Holdsworth family on the Board of the company.

See Halifax Bus Station, Charles Holdsworth and Walton & Helliwell Limited

Hebble Trail
A walking/cycling route around the district. It runs from the railway station, and follows the Hebble Brook to the foot of Salterhebble Hill.

See Eric Brearley

Hebble Valley Spinners
Formerly John Holdsworth & Company Limited

Hebblethwaite
Other forms of the surname include Ebblewhite, Hebble, Hebblewhite and Hepplewhite. Forms of the name are recorded in 1581.

George Redmonds writes that the name originated at a place called Hebblethwaite near Sedbergh, Cumberland, and Thomas Hebyltwhayte is recorded at Northowram in 1539 and Robert Heblethwaite at Hipperholme in 1672.

Local occurrences are usually from Elland and Halifax.

The name is derived from hebble and thwaite, meaning a clearing by a bridge

There are currently around 18 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hebblethwaite. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hebblethwaite & Company
Mining company at Binns Bottom Mine [1869]

Hebblethwaite, Christopher
[17??-18??] Dyer in Halifax.

In 1775, he married Sarah Hodgson in Halifax.

Children: John who was a dyer, and married [1799] Sarah Beckwith.

They went to live in Kidderminster [early 1800s]

Hebblethwaite, George
[1848-1???] Son of Henry Hebblethwaite.

He was a retired carpet manufacturer [1891, 1894].

In 1882, he married Fanny Hemingway in Halifax.

Children: (1) Florence [1884]; (2) Henry [1886]; (3) Jane [1887]; (4) Harold [1889].

The family lived at Clare House, Halifax (with his father Henry [1881]); Clare House, Halifax (the widowed Henry was living the family, and the children of George's sister Alice [1891, 1894]) 

Hebblethwaite, Henry
[1817-1894] Son of John Hebblethwaite

He was an overlooker [1851]; a carpet-factory worker [1861]; a partner in John Sheard & Company [1873]; a partner in Sheard & Company; a gentleman [1881]; a retired carpet manufacturer [1891, 1894].

On 20th December 1843, he married Jane Turner [1815-1872] in Halifax.

Children: (1) George; (2) Sarah [b 1850]; (3) Frances [b 1852]; (4) Alice [b 1853] who married John Albert Hoyle.

Jane and son George were living at Dirk Carr, Northowram [1851].

The family lived at Sedburgh Terrace, Halifax [1861]; Clare House, Halifax (1872, and with son George [1881]); Clare House, Halifax (the widowed Henry was living with George's family [1891, 1894]).

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1894

Hebblethwaite, James
[1818-1886] Son of William Hebblethwaite.

Baptised at Halifax Parish Church [23rd August 1818].

He was a coal agent [1840]; a bookkeeper [1851]; a coal agent [1861]; a farmer at Bankfield Farm, Bank Top, Southowram [1869]; a farmer [1871, 1881].

On 28th November 1869, fire destroyed several of his farm buildings.

He married Mary Ann Aspinall [13th September 1840].


Mary Ann was the daughter of Squire Aspinall
 

The family lived at Law Lane, Southowram [with Ann's mother 1841]; Withinfields, Southowram [1851]; 3 Marsh Lane, Southowram [1861]; Little Marsh, Southowram [1871]; Bankfield Farm, Marsh Lane, Southowram [1881].

He died 3rd June 1886.

James and Mary Ann were buried at Saint Anne's Church, Southowram

Hebblethwaite, Jeremiah
[1826-1???] Son of William Hebblethwaite.

Born in Halifax.

He married Nancy.

Children: (1) James; (2) son; (3) Tom.

The family emigrated to America. They settled in Dent County, Missouri

Hebblethwaite, John
[17??-1799] He married Unknown.

Children: (1) William; (2) John; (3) Joseph; (4) Sarah; (5) Hannah who married Mr Holt; (6) Mary who married Mr Stephenson.

The family lived at Hagstocks, Northowram [1799]

Hebblethwaite, John
[17??-18??] He was a husbandman of Northowram.

He married Unknown.

Children: William

Hebblethwaite, John
[1784-18??] Son of John Hebblethwaite

A cloth dresser.

He married Mary [1782-18??].

Children: (1) Henry Hebblethwaite; (2) William.

The family lived at Hagstocks, Northowram [1841]

Hebblethwaite, John
[1816-1882] Son of William Hebblethwaite.

Born in Northowram.

Baptised at Halifax Parish Church [30th June 1816].

He was a butcher [1841].

In 1843, he married Mary Ann Greenwood [1822-1885] in Halifax.

Children: (1) Sarah [b 1844] who married George Pickles; (2) Katherine [b 1846] who married (1) Mr Dean and (2) Herbert Mallinson; (3) Samuel [b 1850]; (4) Lucy Ann [1853-1924] who married George Samuel Patefield; (5) Mary Jane [b 1856]; (6) Alice [b 1859]; (7) William [b 1862]; (8) Joseph [b 1864].

The family lived at 2 Upper Delves, Southowram [1851]; Marsh, Southowram [1861, 1881]; Marsh Fold, Southowram [1871].

Living with them in 1851 were lodgers uncle John Thwaite [1804-18??] and Samuel Thwaite [1829-1???].

John died 9th November 1882 [aged 67]. Mary Ann died 24th August 1885 [aged 63].

Members of the family were buried at Saint Anne's Church, Southowram

Hebblethwaite, Joseph
[1???-1937] Of Hipperholme. Designer

Hebblethwaite, Joseph
[17??-18??] Dyer.

He married Grace.

Children: Hannah [b 1796] who married John Crapper

Hebblethwaite, Joseph
[1872-19??] Born in Halifax.

He was a tapestry designer (carpet) [1901].

He married Ann Frances [1869-19??] from Halifax.

They lived at 67 Chester Road, Akroydon [1901]

Hebblethwaite, R.
[18??-18??] Dyer at Southowram.

In May 1850, he was declared bankrupt

Hebblethwaite, Sarah Ann
[1828-1???] Daughter of William Hebblethwaite.

She married (1) Mr Standeven.

Children: (1) John William; (2) Sarah Ann [1850-1???] who married Benjamin Aaron.

She married (2) Joseph Hebblethwaite of Twinge House.

Children: (3) Nellie who married A. Baldwin; (4) James

Hebblethwaite, Thomas
[1812-1885] Born in Halifax.

He was cashier to a worsted spinner/manufacturer [1851]; cashier to a worsted spinner [1861]; cashier to a merchant [1871]; director of (possibly) James Akroyd & Son [1881].

In 1847, he married Hannah Mellor [1815-1???] in Huddersfield.

Children: (1) Joseph [b 1849]; (2) Emily [b 1851]; (3) Charles Henry [b 1859].

The family lived at 2 Hanson Lane, Halifax [1851]; 10 Rhodes Street, Halifax [1861]; Norfolk Place, Halifax [1871, 1881, 1891]

Hebblethwaite, William
[17??-1???] He married Martha Briggs.

Children: (1) Jeremiah; (2) Thomas; (3) Joseph; (4) William; (5) Christopher; (6) Elizabeth; (7) Hannah; (8) Mary; (9) Ruth Ann

Hebblethwaite, William
[1792-1861] Son of John Hebblethwaite.

Born in Northowram.

He was a coal miner in Northowram; a coal merchant [1850]; a farmer in Southowram.

He farmed at Snydal Farm, Southowram [from sometime before 1841 to April 1861, when son William took over].

He married (1) Sarah Holt at Halifax Parish Church [27th December 1813].


Sarah was the daughter of John Holt
 

Children: (1) John; (2) James; (3) twins Mary [b 1821]; (4) Samuel [b 1821]; (5) William; (6) Joseph [b 1825] who was a mechanic [1841], an engineer [1851]; (7) Harry / Henry [b 1827] who married [1853] Esther Ann from Leeds; (8) Sarah Ann; (9) Edwin [b 1831] who was a wheelwright [1851] who married [1870] Sarah Ann Sutcliffe [1832-1???] from Halifax.

His wife Sarah were buried at Saint Anne's Church, Southowram [17th November 1848].

In 1850, he married (2) Anne Taylor [1811-1882] from Southowram.

He died in April 1861.

William and Ann were buried at Saint Anne's Church, Southowram

Hebblethwaite, William
[1823-1???] Son of William Hebblethwaite.

Born in Southowram.

He was a butcher [1841]; a farmer at Snydal Farm, Southowram [April 1861 to 1881]

Hebblewhite
A variant of the surname Hebblethwaite

Hebden
Other forms of the surname include Ebden, Ebdon, Epton, Hebdin, Hebdon, Hepden and Hepton.

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

The name has the same meaning as the element Hebden.

It is accepted that the surname originated in the village of Hebden, near Grassington in Wharfedale, North Yorkshire. This was a Saxon manor granted to Uchtred who became known as de Hebden. The male line died out in the early 15th century.

There are currently only around 8 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hebden. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Hebden family
Martin Hebden was an early member of the family.

Members of the family were merchants, baptised at Northgate Presbyterian Chapel, and buried at Square Chapel

Hebden & Halifax Limited
Wholesale manufacturing chemists at 27 Winding Road, Halifax [1936].


Question: Is this business connected to W. C. & H. Hebden?

 

Hebden Angling Club, Hebden Bridge
Recorded in 1913, when the membership was 32

Hebden, Benjamin
[18??-1???] Of Wakefield.

He became head gardener for Richard Kershaw Lumb. He moved to Cheltenham with Lumb.

In May 1860, he and Lumb won the RHS Silver Cup as first prize for 10 azaleas at the Cheltenham Flower Show

Hebden Bridge...
Entries beginning Hebden Bridge ... and The Hebden Bridge ... are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The Hebden Chronicle
Newspaper published by Edwin and Josiah Wade in 1862.

See Hebden Bridge Chronicle

Hebden Dale
Wooded valley near Heptonstall and Hebden Bridge, popularly known as Hardcastle Crags

Hebden Dyeing Company
Hebden Bridge.

Closed 1983

Hebden, Francis
[17??-1???] A Halifax merchant.

He married Elizabeth Murgatroyd from Luddenden.

Children: John

Hebden, Francis
[1800-1884] Son of John Hebden.

Born in Ballymena, Ireland.

Watchmaker and clockmaker at 3 New Market Street, Halifax [1829] and 5 Northgate, Halifax [1837].

On 25th December 1838, he married Elizabeth Carr [1818-1889] at Saint Mark's Church, Woodhouse.


Elizabeth was the daughter of worsted manufacturer John Carr
 

Children: (1) John [d 1840] who died in infancy; (2) William Carr; (3) Henry [1844-1845] who died aged 7 months; (4) Ellen [1846-1848] who died aged 16 months; (5) Ellen [b 1849]; (6) Henry [b 1851]; (7) Fanny [b 1853]; (8) Mary Jane [b 1855]

The family lived at 10 Northgate, Halifax [1861].

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plots Number 2064] & [2065]

Hebden Hall, Hebden Bridge
A later name for the Ebenezer Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge

Hebden Hey Farm, Hebden Bridge
Hardcastle Crags. Thornton's Tea Rooms were here

Hebden Hey, Hardcastle Crags
The cottage and the estate were owned by Mr Thomas.

Owners and tenants have included

Traces of mediæval iron-working have been found here

Hebden Hey Scout Centre
Hardcastle Crags. Offers 2 hostels and camp-sites with accommodation for members and other organisations. There is a day centre.

The location claims some links with Tom Bell's Cave

Hebden Hey Scout Hostel
On the site of the former Cosy Corner Guest House & Café at Hardcastle Crags

Hebden, James
[1791-18??] Watchmaker and clockmaker at Woolshops, Halifax [1822], 61 Woolshops, Halifax [1829], 62 Woolshops, Halifax [1834], and 35 Woolshops, Halifax [1837, 1841]

Hebden, John
[1779-1852] Of Halifax.

Son of Francis Hebden.

He was a cloth dresser [1799].

He joined the local volunteers and went on to serve in the Tay Fencibles in Ulster [1799-1802] and the 1st battalion of the 8th King's Regiment of Foot [1804]. He saw service in Europe, the West Indies, and British North America.

He was Lieutenant Adjutant in the Canadian Voltigeurs militia or Light Infantry Regiment, a group of French-Canadians raised to fight alongside British troops defending Montreal and lower Canada against American invasion [1812].

On 25th October 1813, he was mentioned in dispatches for his bravery at the Battle of Châteauguay in which a group of 400 Voltigeurs and 170 Mohawk Indian allies under Lieutenant Colonel Charles de Salaberry routed 4000 Americans under General Wade Hampton who were advancing on Montreal.

On 3rd June 1799, he married Mary McCloud of Halifax, at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Francis; (2) son [d 1852] who died a few days before his father.

He retired and died in Halifax on Boxing Day 1852.

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plots Number 2064] & [2065]

Hebden, Martin
[16??-1???] An early member of the Hebden family.

He married Unknown.

Children: William [b 1673]

Hebden Royd
See Mayor of Hebden Royd, Hebden Royd Council Offices, Hebden Royd Town Council and Hebden Royd Urban District Council

Hebden Royd Bowling Association

Hebden Royd Council Offices

Hebden Royd, Mayor of

Hebden Royd Town Council
The Parish council has 6 wards and 18 seats.

  In June 2011, the Halifax Courier report that the Labour members of the Council, in a somewhat churlish gesture, has refused to spend any money on the Queen's Diamond Jubilee of 2012
 

See Mayor of Hebden Royd

Hebden Royd Urban District Council
Formed in 1937 by the amalgamation of Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd Urban District Council. The first Council meeting was held on 7th April 1937.

See Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale and Urban District Council

Hebden Royd urnfield
Enclosed Bronze Age urnfield lying north west of Rough Bottom on Midgley Moor

Hebden's: Sarah & Jane Hebden
Milliners & dress makers at 12 Old Market, Halifax [1834]

Hebden, Thomas
[1763-1795] A Halifax merchant.

He died at Derby

Hebden valley mills
From the late 18th century, there were several mills alongside the Hebden Water at Hebden Bridge – including Gibson Mill / Lord Holme Mill, New Bridge Mills, Midgehole Mill, Lee Mill, Foster Mill, Nutclough Mill, Hangingroyd Mill, and Bridge Mill.

See Cragg Mills

Hebden's: W. C. & H. Hebden
The name of the business established by William Carr Hebden [1882]


Question: Is this business connected to Hebden & Halifax Limited?

 

Hebden Water
Stream which rises at Greenwood Lee and Shackleton Clough, divides Heptonstall and Wadsworth and flows through Hardcastle Crags to join the Calder at Black Pit, Hebden Bridge.

Documents produced by the Priory of Lewes refer to the river as

Aqua de Heoppe Dene

See Gibson Mill Toll Gate, Hebden, Hebden Bridge Old Bridge and Stepping Stones, Hardcastle Crags

Hebden, William Carr
[1840-1918] JP.

Son of Francis Hebden.

Born in Halifax [31st December 1840].

Around 1882, he established business – W. C. & H. Hebden – as a manufacturing chemist, wholesale druggist and drysalter at Albany Works, Halifax and Upper Cross Street, Halifax.

The firm manufactured a range of products including baking powder, chemicals, drugs, drysalteries, essences, herbs, inks, jellies, soaps, stains, syrups, varnishes, Hebden's Gloss for linen, and Camphortar deodoriser, insect destroyer & air purifier.

He was active in local affairs and a Town Councillor. He was appointed Justice of the Peace [1899].

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 2064].

See Hebden & Halifax Limited and Crossley Hodgson

Hebden's: William Hebden & Sons
Cloth dressers at Blackwall, Halifax [1809]

Hebdin
A variant of the surname Hebden

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Hebdon
A variant of the surname Hebden

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Heble Bridge, Luddenden Dean
Aka Low Bridge, Luddenden Dean

Hecht, Eduard
[1832-1887] German composer who was involved with musical societies at Bradford and Halifax

The Heck Cart
This vehicle can be seen in the Cart Sheds at Shibden Hall. It was designed specially for use on the local hill roads It was built around 1???

Heckden
A lost settlement in Shelf. It is mentioned up to the 15th century.

See Holden

Hedge House Farm, Bradshaw
Owners and tenants have included

Hedger, Rev Violet
[18??-19??] Minister at North Parade Baptist Church, Halifax [1933]. In 1937, she moved to Zion Church, Chatham

Hedley, George
[18??-18??] Artist and armorial painter.

He lived at Ferguson Street, Halifax [1845, 1850]

Hedley, George
[1836-1852] He was apprenticed to a plumber and glazier. He was working in the weaving shed at John Crossley's and – contrary to orders – was walking on the ridge of the roof of the weaving and print shed, when he fell on some cog wheels in motion, and was killed on the spot. At the inquest on 24th August 1852, a verdict of accidental death was recorded

Hedley, Joseph
[17??-1???] He married Mary Halliday.


Mary was the daughter of
Richard Halliday
 

Heeley Dam, Mankinholes

Heeley Hill, Mankinholes

Heeley View, Mankinholes
2 mid 18th century cottages

Hegan, Maud Emily
[1856-1944] Daughter of John Hegan of Kensington, London.

She married Wyatt Rawson.

She died at Roehampton

The Heginbottom family of Ovenden
The family originated in the Saddleworth area of Lancashire. James Heginbottom was an early member of the local branch of the family

Heginbottom, Amelia
[1???-1840] Of Jumples

Heginbottom, Amelia Jane
[1841-1913] Of Ovenden. Daughter of James Heginbottom.

She never married.

She lived at Black Boy House [1913].

She was buried at Illingworth Church [10th November 1913]

Heginbottom, Edward Hartley
[1893-1916] Son of Henry Heginbottom.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 2nd Battalion Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry.

He was killed 13th November 1916.

He was buried at the Munich Trench British Cemetery [b 7]

Heginbottom, Henry
[1849-1927] Son of James Heginbottom.

Born in Ovenden [21st September 1849].

On 13th August 1884, he married Margaret Ann Hartley.


Margaret Ann was born in Ovenden, the daughter of Joseph Hartley
 

Children: (1) Amanda Elizabeth [1885-1950] who never married; (2) Joseph Henry [1886-1959] who never married; (3) Richard James; (4) Edward Hartley.

The children were born in Ovenden.

The family lived at 15 Downend Road, Bristol [1916].

The couple died in Bristol: Margaret Ann [27th March 1922]; Henry [11th February 1927]

Heginbottom, James
[1783-1854] Of Jumples House, Ovenden. Born in Saddleworth. He was an early member of the Heginbottom family of Ovenden.

He was a cotton manufacturer at Jumples Mill, Ovenden [1816, 1833]. In 1851, he employed 67 men and 38 women.

His son, James, carried on the business.

He was a member of Ovenden District Council; a member of the Board of Guardians; churchwarden at Illingworth [1832, 1840-1841]; churchwarden at Bradshaw; constable at Ovenden [1840s].

He married Mary [1797-1854] from Warley.

Children: (1) James; (2) Joseph; (3) Sarah who married John Briggs.

Mary survived her husband by only a few months


Question: There is clearly some confusion here on my part. Can anyone clarify the relationship between the 2 James Heginbottoms, Mary and Joseph?

 

Heginbottom, James
[1804-1886] Son of James Heginbottom.

Born in Saddleworth.

Baptised at Friarmere, near Delph [25 Nov 1804].

He was churchwarden at Illingworth Church [1859-1862]

He carried on his father's business as a cotton manufacturer. He was at Lee Bank Mills [1861] and at Jumples Mill, Ovenden [1861].

In June 1853, he and Joseph Heginbottom, filed a patent for

improvements in spinning

He married Elizabeth Sheard [1811-1894] from Ovenden, in Halifax [25th September 1832].

Children: (1) Sarah Ann [1833-1910] who married Samuel Holdsworth Thwaite; (2) Amelia; (3) Hannah [1834-1874] who married Thomas Isles; (4) Esther [1836-1919] who never married and died at Black Boy House; (5) Elizabeth [1838-1908] who never married; (6) William; (7) James [1847-1883]; (8) Henry.

The family lived at Jack Royd, Ovenden [1851].

He died in Halifax [3rd March 1886].

He was buried at Illingworth Church [9th March 1866], like most of the family. Probate records show that he left effects valued at £798 3/3d.

Elizabeth died in Halifax [1st May 1894]. She was buried at Illingworth Church [5th May 1894].

Probate records show that she left effects valued at £129.

Heginbottom, Joseph
[1808-18??] Son of James Heginbottom [?].

Born in Saddleworth.

He was a cotton spinner at Ovenden.

In June 1853, he and James Heginbottom, filed a patent for

improvements in spinning

He married Hannah [1824-18??] from Ovenden.

Children: Ralph.

The family lived at Woodlands, Northowram [1851]

Heginbottom, Ralph
[18??-19??] Photographer with Lilywhite Limited

Heginbottom, Ralph
[1849-1911] Son of Joseph Heginbottom.

Partner in Hill & Heginbottom. He lived at Brighton Street, Lee Mount [1905]

Heginbottom, Richard James
[1890-1966] Son of Henry Heginbottom.

Born in Ovenden [27th October 1890].

In [Q2] 1922, he married Jane King Walker [1891-1981] in Bristol.


Jane was born in Kilmarnock
 

They had no children.

The couple died in Bristol: Richard James [20th August 1966] Jane [1981]

Heginbottom, William
[1844-1915] Son of James Heginbottom. Of Mixenden.

In 1867, he filed a patent for

improvements in steam boiler furnaces

He never married

Height Farm, Eastwood
Dyke Lane. Late 16th century house. The mid 19th century barn is also listed

Height Farm, Illingworth
An early name for Maude House, Illingworth

The Height, Ripponden
Aka The Heights. Late 16th century house.

It was owned by the Firth family of Barkisland.

Richard Firth is recorded here [1632].

On 18th May 1752, Michael Firth sold the house to Musgrave Brisco.

Now 2 dwellings

Height Top Farm, Todmorden

Owners and tenants have included

The Heights, Barkisland

Owners and tenants have included

Heights Clough, Wadsworth
There are several Bronze Age mounds and evidence of Iron Age activity

Helen Hill Farm, Jagger Green
Saint Helen's Well, Holywell Green is here

Helewell, Jonathan
[1818-1???] Or Helowell [1851]. Born in Golcar.

He was a power-loom weaver [1851]; a wool handloom weaver [1861].

In 1844, he married Mary Stott.

Children: (1) Sarah Helewell [b 1846] who was a worsted drawer; (2) Ruth Helewell [b 1850] who was a stripper of safe lists.

The family lived at 22 Northgate, Elland [1861].

In 1861, Martha [b 1842], daughter of Mary who was a safe lister [1861], Susannah Bailey who was a power-loom weaver, and Susannah's son Albert were also with family

Helias, son of Essolf de Sothill
[11??-11??] Or Helie or Elias. Of Scandinavian descent.

Son of Essolf.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Reginald son of Helias de Sothill; (2) Michael de Sothill; (3) John de Sothill; (4) (probably) Fergus son of Helias de Stansfeld.

About 1169, his brother Jordan son of Essolf (de Thornhill) had his inheritance in Sowerbyshire confirmed by Hamelin, Earl Warren, and Jordan granted a fourth part of it to Helias, and his heirs, and seven oxgangs of land in Stansfeld, and in Rottenstall, to hold of Jordan and his heirs, as of the first begotten, by right of foreign service.

Helias appeared in the Pipe Roll in 1166 fined 1 mark for concealing a plea of the Crown. His brother Richard de Tong was also fined 1 mark for the same offence.

Helias was listed in the Liber Niger Scaccario of 1166 as holding of Henry de Laci (Lacy) a quarter knight's fee.

He witnessed a charter (Ch.69, EYCvol.8) by Hamelin earl de Warenne to Matthew de Horbury, [1164-96]

The Helig
Like Halig, this has been recorded as a name for the Hebble

Hell Croft, Sowerby
Watson says that:
At Sowerby, was once a castle, the foundation of which may yet be seen in a field near the top of the town, adjoining to which is piece of ground, called the Hell Croft, where, no doubt, the dead were buried. It is not known at what time it was built, but it is clear, however, that during the possessions of the Earls of Warren, there was a castle here, and that they frequently resorted hither for the diversions of hunting, hawking, etc. This was conveyed by John, the last Earl, to King Edward II.; but when the fort was suffered to decline, does not appear

Hell Hole Rocks
Hebden Bridge

Hellawell
A variant of the surname Helliwell

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently only around 4 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hellawell. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hellawell & Irvine
Cotton spinners at Halifax. Partners included T. Hellawell and A. Irvine.

In August 1862, the partnership was declared bankrupt

Hellawell, Benjamin
[1929-2009] He married Constance [1926-1996]

The couple are remembered at Christ Church, Barkisland on the grave of Joseph Jagger's family

Hellawell, Edward
[1699-1803] Of Norland.

Died in November 1803 at the age of 104.

See Longevity

Hellawell, John
[18??-18??] In March 1853, he was charged at Halifax Magistrates' Court with unloading a gun in the house of Hannah Stansfield, a beershop keeper of Southowram, shooting through the ceiling and thereby damaging a bed to the amount of 5/-

He was fined 2/6d plus expenses

Hellawell, Thomas
[18??-18??] Innkeeper at the Old Dumb Mill, Hipperholme.

On 24th December 1858, he was fined 30/- for a charge of

having his house open for the sale of beer and spirits at 5 minutes before 4 o'clock on Sunday afternoon

after a friend and neighbour, Mr Ryder, of Hipperholme was found with a glass of spirits before him. Hellawell explained that Ryder had just sat down and a previous customer must have left the glass

Hellewell
A variant of the surname Helliwell

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently only around 3 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hellewell. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hellewell's: H. Hellewell & Company
Worsted spinners established by Harry Hellewell at Fairlea Mill, Luddendenfoot.

In 1924, they built Holme Royd Mills nearby.

The business closed in 1972 against foreign competition

Hellewell, Harry
[18??-19??] He established H. Hellewell & Company at Luddendenfoot

Hellewell, James
[17??-18??] Fancy woollen manufacturer at Peel Croft Factory, Elland [1809]

Hellewell, John
[1835-1904] Born in Sowerby Bridge.

He was an ironfounder at Hollings Mill Lane, Sowerby Bridge; custodian of Sowerby Bridge Conservative Club.

He lived at Lily Street, Sowerby Bridge [1904]

Hellewell Syke Well

Hellewell's: W. H. Hellewell & Company
Indigo and piece dyers, stovers & finishers at Asquith Bottom Dye Works, Sowerby Bridge [1903, 1905]

Hellfire crossroads
Aka Hell fire corner. The popular name for the junction of the A58 Leeds Road and the A641 Brighouse-Bradford road, near Wyke and Norwood Green

The Red Lion stood here.

The crossroads is said to be haunted by a phantom car.

See Red Lion, Wyke

Helliwell...
The entries for people with the surname Helliwell are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Helliwell
Other forms of the surname include Hallewell, Halliwell, Hallowell, Hellawell, Hellewell, Hellowell and Hollowell.

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Recorded in 1297.

Probably means holy well, and may be derived specifically from the area of Priestley Green around Helliwell Syke Well.

The name is common in and around Todmorden

There are currently around 54 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Helliwell. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Helliwell family of Greenhurst Hey
The family lived at Greenhurst Hey, Todmorden.

Thomas Helliwell and Michael Helliwell were early members of the family.

The family lost the property when John Helliwell went bankrupt in 1864.

Helliwell & Pilling
Of Stansfield. Recorded in 1853

Helliwell & Smith
Card makers at Elland.

Partners included William Helliwell and William Smith.

The partnership was dissolved in July 1837

Helliwell & Sons
Bobbin makers at Pudsey Bobbin Works, Todmorden.

In May 1878, the workers went on strike when their wages were reduced, but they resumed at the old rate of pay.

In January 1879, their workers went on strike against a proposed reduction of 10% in their wages.

See Thompson Helliwell

Helliwell & Sutcliffe
Fustian manufacturer of Scout Road, Mytholmroyd [1900] and Hollins Works, Hebden Bridge [1905].

Partners included Thomas S. Helliwell and Dan Sutcliffe

Helliwell Green
Mentioned in the Nomina Villarum [1865]. It presumably refers to Holywell Green which does not appear in the list

Helliwell's Patent Glazing Company
Birds Royd, Rastrick. Established in 1878 by Thomas W. Helliwell to produce his patented glazing and roofing systems.

During World War II, they manufactured bomb parts, landing craft, Bailey Bridge parts and other products. They also repaired and straightened damaged armour plating for tanks

Helliwell's: Sarah, Martha & Lydia Helliwell
Cotton spinners at Friths Mills, Dulesgate.

On the death of William Helliwell in December 1856, his widow and 2 daughters took over the running of the mill.

Partners included John Helliwell, Sarah (widow of William HelliwellMartha Helliwell and Lydia Helliwell.

The partnership was dissolved in September 1859

Helliwell Syke Farm, Lightcliffe
Named after Helliwell Syke Well, Priestley Green. In the cellar of the house, there is a well which provides a constant supply of drinking water.

Owners and tenants have included

Helliwell Syke Well

Helliwell's: T. & J. Helliwell
Cotton spinners at Haugh Stone Mill, Stansfield [1811]. They operated 648 spindles

Helliwell's: T. Helliwell & Sons
Halifax linen shop.

They were at the large shop at north-east corner of the junction of Crown Street and Waterhouse Street – later occupied by Sam Stocks & Sons Limited

Helliwell's: W. & J. Helliwell
Cotton spinning firm at Friths Mill, Walsden. Partners included brothers William Helliwell and John Helliwell.

They employed 45 men & 76 females.

The business prospered and, by 1834, William decided to build another mill on the opposite side of the road to run in conjunction with the old mill.

The brothers erected two sets of cottages, a group of 11 at Friths Wood Bottom, and a further 6 nearer Stoneswood, Dulesgate

Helliwell's: William Helliwell & Sons Limited
Iron and tin-plate workers and trunk manufacturers established around 1830 by Henry Helliwell and continued by his son William Helliwell. They had business at The Causeway, Halifax before moving to Excelsior Trunk Works in South Parade around 1885. They were probably the largest makers of trunks in England. The company's output was said to be 2000 trunks per week.

See Lewis Helliwell

Helliwell: Young Helliwell & Sons
Picker makers at Ridgefoot Mill, Todmorden established by Young Helliwell and his sons Fred and Arthur [1905]

Hellowell
A variant of the surname Helliwell

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently around 12 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hellowell. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hellowell, Abraham
[1827-1907] Son of John Hellowell.

Born in Erringden.

He was a carpet weaver [1851]; a stone cutter [1861]; a farmer of 2½ acres [1881].

On 2nd June 1862, he married Elizabeth Sutcliffe [1830-1900] at Halifax Parish Church.


Elizabeth already had children: (1) Lavinia [b 1848]; (2) Emily [b 1855]; (3) Hellowell [1857-1945] who was a joiner [1881]; (4) Hannah [b 1860].

Abraham & Elizabeth Sutcliffe (woollen weaver) were living together in 1861

 

Children: (1) Honor Whiteley; (2) Alice [1867-1897]; (3) Young [1870-1936].

The family lived at 4 Lane Ends, Soyland [1861]; Waggon Farm, Soyland [1881]

Hellowell, Abraham
[1838-1896] Of Higham, Sowerby.

He worked at Mill House and had been ill for about a fortnight when, intending to resume work in a few days, he went for a walk. Near Coggin Lane, he was seen to fall; help was summoned, but he died a few minutes later. Heart disease was supposed to be the cause

Hellowell, Alfred
[1859-1944] Born in Sowerby.

He was a wool washer [1880].

On 13th December 1880, he married Alice Speak [1858-1946] in Halifax.


Alice was born in Sowerby
 

Children: Brierley

Hellowell, Arthur
[18??-191?] Of Sowerby.

During World War I, he served as a Private.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on the World War I Memorial in Sowerby Church

Hellowell, Brierley
[1882-1915] Son of Alfred Hellowell.

Born in Sowerby [16th April 1882].

In [Q4] 1908, he married Hannah Cockroft in Halifax.

Children: Gladys [b 1910].

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 2nd Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles).

He was killed in action [10th March 1915] (aged 32).

He is remembered on the Le Touret Memorial [Panel 15 & 16]. He is remembered on a memorial in Saint Michael's Church, Mytholmroyd and in the book Royd Regeneration

Hellowell Brothers
20th century clothing manufacturer at Brunswick Mill, Hebden Bridge

Hellowell, Charlie
[18??-191?] Of Sowerby.

During World War I, he served as a Private.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on the World War I Memorial in Sowerby Church

Hellowell, Claude
[1894-1956] Son of Whiteley Hellowell.

Born in Soyland.

He worked on his father's farm [1911].

He established [1924] a business which became Claude Hellowell Limited.

On 31st July 1919, he married Ivy Lawrence [1899-1978] at Sowerby Church.

Children: unknown

Hellowell's: Claude Hellowell Limited
Transport and haulage company established at Triangle by Claude Hellowell in 1924.

The original work was a pony and cart carrying laundry.

His greatgrandsons, Peter and Paul Hellowell, are the current [2013] owners of the business

Hellowell, James
[18??-1855] Of Sowerby.

During the campaigns of 1854 and 1855, in the Crimea War, he served with the 20th Regiment.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on the memorial in Sowerby Church

Hellowell, James
[1803-18??] Born in Soyland.

He was a tailor & draper [1861].

He married Elizabeth [1806-18??] from Soyland.

Children: (1) Hannah [b 1824] who was a woollen weaver [1861]; (2) Sarah [b 1826] who was a sewing machine tenter [1861]; (3) John William [b 1834] who was a tailor [1861]; (4) Joshua [b 1841] who was a cotton twister [1861]; (5) Mary Ann [b 1845] who was a house servant [1861].

The family lived at Shaw's Terrace, Soyland [1861]

Hellowell, John
[1796-1851] From Erringden.

He was a weaver [1841].

On 10th June 1816, he married Betty Clayton [1796-1862] at Saint Thomas à Becket, Heptonstall.


Betty was the daughter of a farmer at Lane Ends, Soyland [1851, 1861]
 

Children: (1) Mary[1817-1878]; (2) William; (3) Hannah[1824-1882]; (4) Abraham; (5) Henry[1828-1884] who was a cotton twister [1851]; (6) David [b 1831] who was a woollen weaver [1851, 1861]; (7) Richard[1834-1862] who was a factory worker [1851].

The family lived at Blackshaw Clough, Soyland [1841]; Lane Ends, Soyland [1851]; 1 Lane Ends, Soyland [1861]

Living with the family in 1861 was Betty's brother John Clayton [aged 80] (retired farmer).

On 26th September 1862, Betty's bruised and disfigured body was found by her son, David, in Flat Head stone quarry near their home. Son William was charged with her murder and acquitted.

John, Betty & son Richard were buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones

Hellowell, Samuel Greenwood
[1907-1997] He compiled A Chronological History of Cragg Vale

Hellowell, Whiteley
[1864-1931] Son of Abraham Hellowell.

Born in Soyland [14th July 1864].

His birth was registered as Hellowell Sutcliffe & Hellowell Hellowell

Baptised as Honor Whiteley Hellowell at Saint Mary's, Cottonstones [6th November 1864].

He was a cotton spinner [1881, 1891, 1901]; a farmer [1911].

In [Q1] 1887, he married Mary Holroyde [1865-1931] from Soyland.

Children: (1) Irvine [1891-1971] who was an overlooker's assistant (cotton) [1911]; (2) Claude; (3) May [1898-1954] who was a part-timer silk spinner [1911]; (4) Tom [1907-1961] who married Jessie Sutcliffe [1912-1983]; (5) child who died in infancy.

The family lived at 4 Four Lane Ends, Lighthazle, Soyland [1891]; Lumb House, Mill Bank [1901]; Turn Lee Farm, Triangle [1911].

Whiteley died at Turn Lee Farm, Triangle [11th May 1931] Mary died 2 months later [11th July 1931].

Members of the family were buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones

Helm, George
[1853-1921] Son of Thomas Helm.

He was a partner in Thomas Helm & Sons; a member of the Rastrick Local Board; a member of Brighouse Town Council.

He lived at Croft House, Rastrick [where he was living alone with servants 1901]

After the death of her husband Thomas Topham, George's sister Mary and her sons George and John, were living with George at Rastrick.

Later, George and John were in business at the Helm family's Spout Mills, Rastrick.

On his death, George Helm was sole partner in Thomas Helm & Sons.

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £311,450

Helm, John William
[1833-1909] Born in Sowerby Bridge.

He was a plumber and painter [1871]; a plumber & glazier [1881]; a retired plumber [1891, 1901]; Chairman of the Sowerby Bridge Local Board [15th April 1891-15th April 1892].

On 16th April 1862, he married Elizabeth Wylde at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: Mary Alice [b 1862] who married Richard William Wood.

In 1871, the family were living at Wharf Street, Sowerby Bridge with his family, his mother-in-law Ellen Wylde, his brother-in-law James Gaskell, his sister-in-law Mary Alice.

The family lived at Oakleigh, Willow Hall, Sowerby Bridge [1881, 1891, 1901].

In 20th February 1884, he married (2) Mary Alice Wylde, widow of James Gaskell

John William Helm died at Oakleigh [17th March 1909].

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £6,670 13/3d. Probate was granted to Mary Alice, his widow, Richard William Wood and Alfred Greenwood mill manager

Helm, Joseph William
[1851-1907] Born 3rd December 1851.

He became a partner in Thomas Helm & Sons He was elected Councillor in the Brighouse Municipal Elections of 1893.

In [Q3] 1880, he married Eleanor Vickerman in Halifax.


Eleanor was the daughter of James Vickerman
 

Children: (1) George [1881-1882]; (2) Gertrude Eleanor [1890-1964]; (3) Thomas Archibald.

The family lived at Laurel Bank, Rastrick.

He died at Elder Lea, Rastrick [12th December 1907].

He was buried at Rastrick Cemetery [14th December 1907]

Helm, Starkey & Noble
Fancy goods manufacturers of Rastrick. Partners included Thomas Helm, Mr Starkey and John Noble.

In 1841, Starkey & Noble sold their shares in the business to Helm and emigrated to America.

Helm, Thomas
[17??-18??] Partner in Helm, Starkey & Noble.

In 1841, Starkey & Noble sold their shares in the business to Helm and emigrated to America.

Helm, Thomas
[1818-1884] Son of William Helm.

He was a fancy woollen manufacturer [1861].

In 1870, he established Thomas Helm & Sons at Spout Mills spinning and scribbling mills, in the valley behind his home.

He married Elizabeth Fox.


Elizabeth was the daughter of Joseph Fox
 

Children: (1) George; (2) Sarah [1856-1???]; (3) Mary [b 1858] who married Thomas Topham.

The family lived at Croft House, Rastrick [1851]; New Hey Road, Rastrick [1861, 1871, 1881]

Living with them in 1851 was Thomas's mother Sarah. The address is given as Spout, but whether or not this was Croft House is not clear

Helm, Thomas Archibald
[1892-1975] He was founder of Thomas Helm & Sons of Spout Mills, Rastrick; a partner in Helm, Starkey & Noble.

In 1918, he married Kathleen Mary Dyson in Halifax.


Kathleen Mary was the daughter of William Lord Dyson
 

Children: (1) Christine M [b 1920]; (2) Kathleen M [b 1923].

The family lived at Lothian House, Brighouse

Helm's: Thomas Helm & Sons
Fancy tweed, worsted and woollen manufacturer of Spout Mills, Rastrick established in 1870 when Thomas Helm succeeded to an earlier business.

His sons, Joseph William and George eventually took over the business. The company employed around 2000 workers and operated 5,000 spindles [1895].

On his death in 1921, George Helm was sole partner.

The business is recorded in 1939 and 1940

Helm's: W. & C. W. Helm
Cotton spinners and doublers at Elland. Partners included W. Helm and C. W. Helm.

In September 1873, the partnership was declared bankrupt

Helm, William
[1???-18??] Huddersfield-born woollen manufacturer who moved to Spout Hill, Rastrick in the early 1800s, putting-out work to local people to produce waistcoat and trouser material. By the middle of the 19th century, he had 150 weavers working for him.

William Helm of Rastrick is listed as a fancy manuufacturer [1838].

In 1850, he and sons – John and Thomas – built Spout Mill.

In April 1852, he was the defendant in a court case when he had refused to pay for yarn of unsatisfactory quality.

In February 1853, and every year to at least 1865, William Helm, manufacturer of Rastrick, is listed among the partners of the West Riding Union Banking Company.

In 1861, he was also listed as a fancy woollen manufacturer employing 180 hands at 11 White Hart Yard, Huddersfield.

He married Sarah.

Children: (1) John; (2) Thomas; (3) Sarah.

The family lived at Spout [1841, 1861]

It is not clear whether Spout was Croft House.

Living with the widowed William in 1861 were his widowed daughter Sarah and her son, William

Helme, Christopher David
[19??-] Aka Chris. Former policeman and local historian of the Brighouse and Bailiff Bridge areas of Calderdale. He is a popular speaker and writes a local history column in the Brighouse Echo. His published works include

  • Reminiscences – an audio cassette produced by the Calderdale Talking Newspaper Association

  • Reminiscences of Bailiff Bridge, Lightcliffe & Hipperholme

  • Reminiscences of Old Brighouse & District [1985]

  • Brighouse & District [2005]

  • Sunny Vale Pleasure Gardens [2007]

Help!
The Foldout lists some of around 0 points on which I should welcome your help and assistance

Helston, Mother
[1???-1???] A seer and fortune-teller in the Upper Calder Valley.

William Towneley approached her for advice on how to win the heart of Lady Sybil.

Mother Helston and Lady Sybil are said to be buried at the foot of Eagle Crag, Todmorden

Hemingway...
The entries for people with the surname Hemingway are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Hemingway
[Surname]

George Redmonds writes that Richard de Hemmyngway is recorded in 1309 and this suggests that Hemmyngway was a placename.

Further evidence suggests that this was a settlement in the Southowram area.

The name may mean someone who lives by Hemming's path, and Hemming or Hemmingr may be a personal name.

There are currently around 46 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hemingway. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Hemingway family
The family built Walterclough Hall, Southowram.

See Shibden Mill

Hemingway & Thomas
Piano manufacturers and music sellers at 11-13 Northgate, Halifax. They had a piano factory in Kentish Town, London. They opened the Halifax business around 1865. In 1890, W. Hemingway was the sole proprietor.

See John Priestley

Hemingway's Charity
In his will of 1613, Robert Hemingway left £10 to be loaned from time to time to
certain of the most religious and honest poor, or decayed tradesmen in the township of Northowram

He also gave £10 to the Free Grammar School in Halifax, and £40 towards the maintenance of a preacher at Coley Chapel. Using figures for average earnings, £10 in 1613 is roughly the equivalent of £22,600.00 today, and £40 is roughly the equivalent of £90,500.00.

The charity seems to have disappeared during the 19th century

Hemingway's: Henry Hemingway & Company
Brass founders and finishers at West Parade Brass Works, Halifax [1905]

Hemingway's Pianoforte & Harmonium Warehouse
Music and musical instrument retail agent at 30 Saint James's Road, Halifax [1865, 1895].

In 1899, W. Hemingway's Pianoforte Warehouse was at 11 Northgate, Halifax.

See W. Hemingway

Hemingway's Saddlers
Stood on Briggate, Elland, next to the Malt Shovel [1890s]

Hemingwaye, Sir John
[14??-15??] Son of John Hemingway of Brea. Minister of Hartshead [1528]. The title Sir was adopted by several ministers

Heminway, Henry
[1705-17??] Halifax attorney

Hemm, Frederick
[18??-19??] He lived at Palace House, Hebden Bridge [1905]

Hemmingway, Misses
Around 1840, they ran a school in Brighouse

Hempenstall
A variant of the surname Heptonstall

Hempston Stalle
A spelling of Heptonstall recorded in 1553

Hemstock, Rev Henry
[18??-19??] MA.

Vicar of Bradshaw [1905]

Hemstock, Rev J.
[18??-19??] Vicar of Bradshaw [1892]

Henchcliff
A variant of the surname Hinchliffe

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Henden Bridge, Erringden

Henderson, Rev E. C.
[1???-19??] Vicar of All Souls' Church, Halifax [19??]. He later became an honorary canon at Wakefield Cathedral

Henderson, Edgar
[1889-1915] Son of Joseph Henderson.

Born in Eastney, Hampshire.

He was educated at Parkinson Lane School; a member of Trinity Road Baptist Church, Halifax; a Post Office employee; a member of the Post Office AFC; with the Royal Navy; a stoker on HMS Caesar, moored at Devonport, Devon [1911].

He served in Smyrna and in the Dardanelles.

He was a Stoker 1st Class on HMS Euryalus when he died from pneumonia [8th July 1915].

He is remembered on the Chatham Naval Memorial [Panel 11]

Henderson, Rev J.
[19??-19??] He was at Derker, Oldham before becoming Vicar of Heywood's Chapel [1963]

Henderson, Rev James
[17??-1804] He was educated at Edinburgh University before becoming Minister at Myrtle Grove Chapel, Eastwood [1792].

On his death, there were 4 members of the church. Rev Joseph Cockin tried to improve the situation by sending students from Idle Academy, one of whom, Rev James Scott, succeeded Henderson in 1807

Henderson, Joseph
[1856-1???] Born in Halifax.

He was a Color Sergeant R.M.A. [1891]; an iron merchant's clerk [1901]; with the School of Musketry, Strensall; a Quartermaster-Sergeant; a retired naval pensioner [1911].

In 1879, he married Ellen Jane Strange [1860-1???] in Portsea.


Ellen Jane was born in Dover, the daughter of James Strange, dock yard labourer.

She was an ironer laundress [1881]

 

Children: (1) Robert J G [b 1880] who died on service in India [before 1915]; (2) Thomas Joseph; (3) Willie [b 1884] who was a printer compositor [1901]; (4) George Henry [b 1885] who was a cabinet maker [1901]; (5) Agnes E M [b 1887]; (6) Sophia [b 1890]; (7) Edgar; (8) John J [b 1894]; (9) Marion [b 1896]; (10) Susan [b 1899].

In 1881, Ellen and son Robert were living at Catherine Street, Portsea, Hampshire. with Ellen's parents.

The family lived at 2 Eastney Road, Portsea, Portsmouth [1891]; 21 Gerrard Street, Halifax [1901]; 39 Princes' Street, Mile End, Portsmouth [1915]

Living with them in 1891 was boarder Edward J Capon [aged 20] (bricklayer's labourer).

In 1911, Joseph & Ellen were living at Egton Street, Hull with son Thomas Joseph and his wife

Henderson, Dr S. D.
[18??-19??] Medical practitioner in Brighouse [1894, 1895]

Henderson's: T. & A. Henderson
Drapers at Halifax.

Partners included T. Henderson and A. Henderson.

The partnership was dissolved in June 1851

Henderson, Thomas Joseph
[1882-19??] Or Joseph Thomas.

Son of Joseph Henderson.

Born in Eastney, Hampshire.

He was a mechanic [1901]; a millwright [1911].

Around 1908, he married Annie Eliza [1881-19??]


Annie Eliza was born in Halifax
 

The family lived at 51 Egton Street, Hull [1911]

Living with them in 1911 were Thomas Joseph's parents

Henfrey, Harold
[1895-1915] Born in Todmorden.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 1st/6th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers.

He died 5th June 1915.

He was buried at the Lancashire Landing Cemetery [b 7].

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hengler's Circus Royal
An equestrian display held at the Halifax Riding School in 1851

Henman, Rev Cyril Ernest J.
[1908-19??] Born in Lewisham.

Methodist Minister. He was Superintendent Minister of the Halifax Ebenezer Circuit [1957].

In 1938, he married Elwyn M. E. Gould in Heywood, Lancashire

Hennessy, William
[1872-19??] Born in Walworth, London.

He was a blacksmith [1901].

In [Q4] 1897, he married Mary Annie Evers in Halifax.


Mary Annie was the daughter of
Benjamin Beard Evers
 

Children: Jenny [b 1901].

In 1901, the family were living with Mary Annie's parents

Henpecked Club, Hebden Bridge
Recorded in 1875 when, after
its numbers having form some years been growing smaller by degrees and beautifully less

became defunct

Peace to its ashes

Henpecked Husbands, Ancient Order of
Formed in the 1890s as a rambling society.

In 1904, it was revived by 6 Methodist preachers who met in an empty cottage in Cragg Vale.

Their meetings were held in secret.

Later, they held their meetings at Boulderclough Methodist Chapel – see Boulderclough Henpecked Club.

The group met on Easter Monday for the purpose of

having a real jovial time, free from the care of apron strings

It was disbanded around 1970

Henrey, Rev Thomas
[18??-18??] MA.

Perpetual Curate at Saint Paul's Church, King Cross [1859, 1861]

Henry, Rev Austin
[1???-19??] Priest at Saint Bernard's Catholic Church, Halifax [1935]

Henry Barber fire engine
A fire engine owned by Brighouse Corporation, and named after Henry Jocelyn Barber.

The appliance was used at the Victoria Mill fire on 27th July 1905, but the work was jeopardised when the rubber hoses burst and a rubber joint seized up.

See Brighouse Borough Fire Brigade

Henry, George McWilliams
[1858-19??] MRCS.

Nephew and adopted son of Joseph McCarogher McWilliams.

Born in Omagh, Ireland.

He was Surgeon [1882]; Medical practitioner in Halifax [1891, 1895].

He lived at London House, Halifax [with William Shaw 1881].

On 17th August 1882, he married Rosa Crossley at Harrison Road Chapel, Halifax


Rosa was the daughter of John Crossley of Hopwood Hall, Halifax
 

Children: Mac Williams [b 1885].

The family lived at 8 Carlton Street, Halifax [1891]

Henry, Martin
[1???-19??] During World War II, he served with the Civil Defence.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Henry Moore Sculpture Studio
Art gallery opened at the Dean Clough Galleries in 198?

Henry Sugden Memorial Hall

Henry Whiteley's Fund for Aged People's Treat
Recorded in 1935.

See Henry Whiteley

Henry Whiteley's Park, Ripponden
Dyson Lane. Aka Stones Recreation Ground.

Recorded in 1935, when, in his will, Henry Whiteley left a field near Slitheroe Bridge to Rishworth UDC and Soyland UDC for creation of the park.

Swings here were moved from the children's playground between Stones School and the Butcher's Arms.

Calderdale Council now look after the Park

Hensall Sand Company Limited
Recorded in 1937 at Royal Insurance Buildings, Halifax

Hensby, F.
[18??-191?] He worked for Mackintosh's.

He died in World War I.

He appears on the list of Mackintosh's employees who served in the Great War

Henshaw Barn, Walsden

Owners and tenants have included

Henshaw Farm, Todmorden
Henshaw Road. Early 18th century laithe-house

Hepden
See Hebden, Hebden surname and Hepden surname

Hepden
A variant of the surname Hebden

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Heppell, Rev Thomas
[1876-1949] Born at Corbridge, Northumberland [28th October 1876].

He married Flora J. [1883-1952].

Rev Heppell died in Heysham, Lancashire [5th October 1949]. Flora died at Morecambe [11th December 1952]

Members of the family were buried at Steep Lane Baptist Chapel, Sowerby

Heppenstall
A variant of the surname Heptonstall

Heppenstall, James
[18??-19??] Partner in Haigh & Heppenstall.

He lived at South Lane, Elland [1905]

Hepper Botham, Rastrick
A stream at Rastrick

Heppings Legacy
In 1730, John Greenwood of Heppings gave an annual sum of £1 for the distribution of canvas cloth to the poor of Stansfield who were not in receipt of any other relief. Using figures for average earnings, £1 in 1730 is roughly the equivalent of £1,530.00 today

Heppinstall
A variant of the surname Heptonstall

Hepplewhite
A variant of the surname Hebblethwaite

Heptinstall
A variant of the surname Heptonstall

Hepton
A variant of the surname Hebden

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Hepton, Mary
[1???-17??] A widow who leased the Preaching House, Heptonstall from the Methodists and lived there in Wesley's time. She had a small shop there and sold old clothes and treacle toffee. As the numbers grew, the services were held at Robert Greenwood's house in North Gate

Hepton Rural District Council
Formed in 1937 by the amalgamation of Wadsworth and part of Midgley, and in 1938 included Todmorden. In 18 July 1962, a Local Government Commission proposed that the built-up area of Sowerby Bridge should merge with Halifax and the rest of Sowerby Bridge with Hebden-Hepton Rural District Council

Heptonstall ...
Entries beginning Heptonstall ... and The Heptonstall ... are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

Heptonstall
Other forms of the surname include Hempenstall, Heppenstall, Heppinstall and Heptinstall.

John de Heptonstall is recorded in 1296.

Obviously, the name comes from Heptonstall

The Hepworth family
Of Yew Trees, Lightcliffe. Members included George Hepworth

Hepworth, Albert
[1866-1908] Of Brighouse.

Son of Albert Hepworth.

He may be related to Isaac Hepworth who emigrated to Australia.

Followed his parents as landlord of the Sportsman, Rastrick [1897-1899].

He was landlord of the Railway Hotel, Hebden Bridge [1905, 1908].

In 1885, he married Sarah Ann Kenyon [1869-1905] from Brighouse, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Emily [born in Brighouse 6th March 1888, baptised at Saint John's Church, Rastrick 29th November 1901]; (2) Elsie [born in Australia 20th July 1893, baptised at Saint John's Church, Rastrick 11th November 1901]


Question: Does anyone know how Elsie came to be born in Australia?

 

Sarah Ann died 10th January 1905.

Albert died in 1908.

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £2,323. Using figures for average earnings, £2,323 in 1908 is roughly the equivalent of £759,000.00 today


Question: Does anyone know how Albert acquired his wealth?

 

Hepworth & Son, Brighouse
Brighouse architects.

Established by George Hepworth and George Hepworth.

They designed several local buildings including Alexandra Mill, Saint Anne's in the Grove Church, Southowram, Saint Chad's Mission Church & School, Victoria Baths, Elland, Woodvale Silk Mills, Brighouse and, with Samuel Wilkinson, a cemetery at Audenshaw, near Manchester [1902]

Hepworth, Dyson
[18??-1???] Landlord of the Horse & Jockey Beerhouse, Brighouse [1892].

He was charged with having his house open during prohibited hours on Sunday 20th November 1892, after Sergeant Copping and PC Morley found George Bancroft seated in the beerhouse with a pint of beer in front of him. Hepworth was fined £1 13/- plus costs

Hepworth, Frederick
[1864-19??] An insurance agent at Brighouse.

In 1899, he pleaded guilty to forging and uttering 2 claims on the Royal Liver Friendly Society. He had submitted 2 proposals forms for the life of one Walter Walker. It was said that Walker was living in a house in Elland, whereas he was, in fact, a man of intemperate habits living in the Halifax Workhouse. When Walker died, Hepworth received payment on the first policy, and subsequently repaid it to the Society. Hepworth was sentenced to 12 months' imprisonment with hard labour

Hepworth, George
[1799-1875] Son of John Hepworth.

Architect and surveyor. He was essentially the

Builder of Brighouse

He established a practice which became Hepworth & Son.

In 1830, he married Elizabeth [1810-1877] from Nottinghamshire.

Children: (1) William [b 1831] who was a bookkeeper [1851]; (2) Ann [b 1834]; (3) John [b 1835]; (4) George; (5) Hugh [b 1851].

The family lived at Church Lane, Brighouse [1851].

He died 1st January 1875.

Members of the family were buried at Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse.

Probate records show effects valued at under £2,000

Hepworth, George
[1849-1929] Son of George Hepworth.

Born in Brighouse.

Brighouse-based architect and partner in Hepworth & Son.


In 1878, H. Kershaw – possibly Henry Kershaw – and George Hepworth drew up plans for Bradford Council's Bowling Park, Bradford. Theirs was the winning entry
 

He was an artist and drew a couple of postcards depicting life in Brighouse in the early 20th century.

He was a keen photographer, and a founder member of the Brighouse Photographic Society, and left an excellent record of parts of Brighouse in the 1880s.

In 1885, he wrote Brighouse, its scenery & antiquities.

A collection of his glass photographic plates were held at Brighouse Museum.

He (possibly) married Elizabeth.

He lived at 11 Bradford Road, Brighouse [1894]; 20 Bradford Road, Brighouse [1901, 1929].

Probate records show effects valued at £5,355 19/2d

Hepworth, Hall
[1891-1915] Illegitimate son of Ellen Hepworth; John Edward Holroyd was possibly the father.

Hall is recorded as John Edward's son on all censuses after the marriage of Ellen and John Edward in 1896.

Born in Elland [Q4 1891].

He was a player with Elland Wanderers Football Club.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 1st/4th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

On 6th June 1915, he was at the front and just about to fire, when he was shot by a German sniper, the bullet piercing his head. He died immediately.

He was buried at Y Farm Military Cemetery, Bois-Grenier, France [D 43]

Hepworth, Herbert
[1874-19??] Son of Jonathan Hepworth.

He was a butcher [1908].

On 1st June 1908, he married Maude Platts [1878-19??] in Chapeltown near Ecclesfield


Maude was born in Chapeltown
 

Children: (1) Herbert [b 1905]; (2) Ronald [b 1907].

The children were born out of wedlock

Hepworth, Isaac
[1861-1926] Son of Eliza [1826-1917] and Abraham Hepworth [1825-1890].

Born in Batley.

He may be related to Albert Hepworth.

He emigrated to Australia, arriving in New South Wales on the assisted immigration program on 1st March 1883.

He may have followed his brother Benjamin who emigrated earlier.

On 17th February 1886, he married Annie MacDonald [1865-1929].

Children: (1) Abraham [1886-1956]; (2) Edwin [1887-1967]; (3) Leslie [1889-1946]; (4) Isaac Bernard [1891-1950]; (5) Elsie Eliza [1893-1972]; (6) Stanley Allen [1896-1973]; (7) Annie Nancy [1897-1962]; (8) Dorothy [1899-1937]; (9) Marjorie [1901-1971] who died in the USA; (10) Bertha Roberta [1903-1942]; (11) Ronald [1908-1909].

Isaac died in East Maitland, Australia [22nd February 1926]

Hepworth, Joe
[18??-19??] Cornet player who established McCarty's Prize Band of Clifton

Hepworth, John
[17??-1???] Of Yew Trees, Lightcliffe.

In 1790, he shot a stag at Lightcliffe. In 1948, the Hepworth family presented the antlers to the Brighouse Art Gallery

Hepworth, John
[1772-1863] He married Ann [1772-1833].

Children: (1) George; (2) Hannah [1803-1864]; (3) Mary [1805-1889]; (4) Harriet [1815-1878].

Members of the family were buried at Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse

Hepworth, John
[1808-1848] Of Brighouse.

He married Elizabeth [1812-1852].

The couple were buried at Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse

Hepworth, John
[1852-1886] Son of Joseph Hepworth.

He was brass finisher/innkeeper [1874]; beerhouse keeper at the Freemasons' Arms, Brighouse [1881].

In October 1881, he was fined 19/6d for serving beer to a drunken person, John Greenwood, delver of Southowram. Witnesses said that Greenwood was not drunk, but was of weak intellect. Greenwood was ordered to pay 18/6d or go to prison for 14 days

On 16th April 1874, he married Jane Dawson [1858-1912] in Brighouse.

Children: Joseph

Hepworth, John
[1870-19??] Son of Jonathan Hepworth.

Born in Halifax.

He was a pattern maker [1897].

In 1897, he married (1) Ellen Laura Daws [1873-1909] in Halifax.


Ellen Laura was born in Thursford
 

Children: Arthur [b 1902].

Ellen Laura died 15th June 1909.

She was buried at All Souls' Church, Halifax

In 1910, he married (2) Sarah Ann Wood [1879-19??] in Worksop [1910]


Sarah Ann was born in Whitwell
 

Hepworth's: John & George Hepworth
Joiners at Brighouse.

Partners included John Hepworth and George Hepworth.

The partnership was dissolved in May 1853

Hepworth, Jonathan
[1845-1931] Born in Holmfirth.

He was a model maker.

In 1869, he married Dorothy Bottomley Boocock in Halifax.


Dorothy was the illegitimate daughter of
Hannah Boocock
 

Children: (1) John; (2) Hannah [1871-1933] who married John Arthur Robinson; (3) Herbert; (4) Lucy [b 1882].

The children were born in Halifax.

Dorothy died in Halifax [6th November 1920].

She was buried at All Souls' Church, Halifax

Jonathan died in Halifax [8th August 1931].

He was buried at All Souls' Church, Halifax

Hepworth, Joseph
[1824-1871] Born in Bailiffe Bridge.

He was an iron moulder [1871]; landlord of the Sportsman, Rastrick [1867-1871].

In 1847, he married Ann Hirst [1828-1897] of Southowram, in Dewsbury.

Children: (1) Edward [b 1846]; (2) Sarah [b 1847]; (3) Isaac [1850-1851]; (4) John; (5) Arthur [1860-1864]; (6) Albert; (7) Mary [1868-1951] who married George William Mallinson.

He died 29th January 1871.

Probate records show that he left effects valued at under £100. Probate was granted to his widow Ann.

After his death, his wife Ann took over at the Sportsman [1871-1890], then Sam Eastwood, then the Hepworth's son Albert [1897-1899]

Hepworth, Joseph
[1876-1913] Son of John Hepworth.

He was labourer in the gas works [1897].

On 12th August 1897, he married Kate Ethel Bentley [1876-1944] of Brookfoot, at Saint Matthew's, Rastrick.

Children: (1) John William [b 1898]; (2) Alice [b 1900]; (3) Bob [b 1902]; (4) Frank [b 1905]; (5) Lucy [b 1906]; (6) Tom [b 1909]; (7) George [b 1910]; (8) Joseph [b 1912]

Hepworth, Mary
[1807-1863] of Brighouse.

She was buried at Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse (grave L19) [14th May 1863]

Hepworth, Matthew
[17??-1???] Coiner of Ovenden.

The official notice of 1769 for his arrest described him as

MATTHEW HEPWORTH, late of Ovenden, in the same Parish, Butcher, about 40 years old, 5ft 7 ins high, rather slender, a little pock-broke, wears his own Hair, which is of a reddish Colour, and almost straight

Hepworth, Mr
[1???-1???] Stationmaster at Elland Railway Station [1859]

Hepworth, Mr
[18??-18??] In 1869, he took over the dyeing business of John Burgess.

He moved to Calder Dye Works, Rastrick and traded variously as Burgess & Sons, Thomas Burgess, and Rhodes Sowden.

In 1888, the business was acquired by W. Grandage & Company

Hepworth, Richard
[17??-18??] He was landlord of the White Lion, Rastrick [1822, 1829].

He married Unknown.

Children: Leah who (possibly) married Jonas Wilkinson

Hepworth, Thomas Henry
[18??-19??] He was a Deacon at Blackley Baptist Chapel. In 1911, he was recorded as a Past Deacon

Hepworth, William
[1843-1922] Born in Brighouse.

He was a cotton machine minder [1872].

In 1872, he married Rachel Hollas in Halifax


Rachel was the daughter of
Thomas Hollas
 

Children: (1) Martha Ann [1872-1939] who married George Edward Flather; (2) John Thomas [1873-1942]; (3) Sam [b 1875]; (4) Ada [b 1877]; (5) Wilson

Hepworth, Wilson
[1880-1955] Son of William Hepworth.

In 1905, he married Annie Gooder in Halifax.

Children: (1) Amy [b 1907]; (2) Mary [b 1910]; (3) William [b 1914]; (4) Harry [b 1918]

Herbert, John
[17??-18??] Halifax attorney. He was at 14 Old Market, Halifax [1834]

Herd, Jonas
[1806-1852] He was working at Hazlehurst Quarry, Shibden when he fell from a run and received fatal injuries. At the inquest on 23rd August 1852, a verdict of accidental death was recorded

Herdman, William
[15??-15??] Vicar of Saint Bartholomew's Church, Ripponden [1562]

Herepath, Edwin Loud
[18??-19??] He was a Captain in the Yorkshire Regiment. He was Paymaster with the rank of Honorary Major [24th May 1884]. Staff Paymaster at Halifax [28th February 1899]

Herford, Brooke
[1830-1903] Born in Altrincham. He became a Unitarian minister. Around 1850, he became a preacher at Todmorden Unitarian Church. In 1855, he resigned because his rôle became virtually a private minister for the Fielden family. He went on to serve at Sheffield. In 1875, he moved to the USA

The Heritage Business
A local history resource selling books, cards, toys, and local crafts from premises shared by Routes to Roots at Dale Street, Todmorden

More information: Telephone: 01706-814531


Question: Is there a website with more up-to-date information?

 

Heritage Open Days
A period of 3 or 4 days each year, on which certain scheduled monuments and listed buildings are open to the public

Herman, Rev Donald
[19??-19??] He was vicar at Liverpool before becoming Vicar of Stainland [1954]. In 1959, he left to serve in Carlisle

The Hermit of Hathershelf
Crabtree tells of a hermit who was found living in cave at Hathershelf in 1799.

He was found in possession of stolen goods [including plate and surplices which had been taken from Rochdale parish church], and was transported for life

Heroes

Herrebothlegh, Luddenden
A messuage called Herrebothlegh or Herboithleghe in Luddenden is mentioned in the will of John Deyne of Haworth [1545].

The will is recorded in Volume 2 [1545-1559] of E. W. Crossley's book Halifax Wills

Herring, John Frederick
[1795-1865] He was an artist specialising in animals. He painted the winners of the Saint Leger for thirty-two years, besides other sporting subjects. He was a member of the Society of British Artists [1841], and he exhibited at the Royal Academy and the Society of British Artists. He also drove coaches between Wakefield and Lincoln, Doncaster and Halifax, and London and York

Herring, Mr
[17??-18??] He married Elizabeth Hoyle


Elizabeth was the daughter of
Elkanah Hoyle
 

They lived at Tothill Street, Westminster, London [1799]

Herschel, Sir Friedrich Wilhelm
[1738-1822] Born in Hanover, Germany. He came to England as a musician. He was the first organist at Halifax Parish Church where he stayed for a few months from August to November 1766.

During that time, he played violin in the orchestra – and Joah Bates played organ – when the Messiah had its first performance in Halifax.

He moved to the Octagon Chapel, Bath in December 1766.

He subsequently became famous as an astronomer. In 1781, he discovered the planet Uranus which he always called Georgium Sidus, George's Star. In 1782, he was appointed Court Royal to George III

Hervey, Rev George Augustine
[1866-1937] MA.

He was Vicar of Southowram [1897, 1905]; Vicar of Saint Thomas's Church, Greetland [1906-1910]; Vicar at Sowerby [1909, 1910].

When he was appointed at Saint Thomas's Church, Greetland, there was a tradition of providing a free tea for the choristers between the afternoon and evening services, with a gallon of ale in a stone bottle for the men. Rev Hervey decided that this should stop. The decision resulted in the choir going on strike outside the vestry door. Eventually when the bells stopped ringing, the choristers called the action off, but feelings were never the same.

In 1896, he married Grace Gann [1873-19??] from Clapham, in Wandsworth, London.

Children: George Frederick V.

Hervey, George F V.
[1899-1918] Son of Rev George Augustine Hervey.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 1st/4th Battalion Essex Regiment.

He died 18th August 1918 (aged 19).

He was buried at the Gaza War Cemetery, Palestine [XXXII C 7].

He is remembered on the World War I Memorial in Sowerby Church

Hervey, James
[18??-18??] Stockbroker at Halifax.

In 1851, he was declared bankrupt.

Partner in Lewis & Hervey [1851].

In 1851, the partnership was declared bankrupt

Hervey, Rev William Romaine
[18??-19??] MA.

He was Vicar of Southowram [1892, 1895]; Senior Curate at Halifax Parish Church. In 1895, he was appointed vicar of Birstall, Leeds

Heseltine
[Surname]

Heseltine, Herbert Bentley
[1880-1917] During World War I, he served as a Private with the 8th Battalion York & Lancaster Regiment.

He died 26th August 1917 (aged 37).

He was buried at Bedford House Cemetery [Enc 21 E 38]. He is remembered on a memorial in Saint John in the Wilderness, Cragg Vale and in the book Royd Regeneration

Hesilrige, Rev Charles Maynard
[1832-1???] From Hertfordshire.

He was Curate at Hartshead / Clifton [1881].

In 1872, he married Sarah Hannah Mason at Tadcaster.

Children: (1) Grey [b 1872]; (2) Maria [b 1874]; (3) Charles [b 1876]

Hesketh, Rev D. C.
[19??-19??] Vicar of Saint Augustine's Church, Pellon [1944]

Hesketh, Rev Robert
[1697-1774] Born in Bolton. He was educated at Glasgow University. He was minister at Bolton-le-Moors [1722], Carnforth [1725] and Walmsley before becoming Minister at Myrtle Grove Chapel, Eastwood [1739] and Minister of Heywood's Chapel [May 1744].

During his ministry, a parsonage was built at Laithe Croft, Northowram. To supplement his income, he built a school near the new parsonage.

When Scott's Academy moved from Heckmondwike to Northowram, it was held at Hesketh's school. The students stayed at the Parsonage.

He married Helen.

Children: (1) a daughter; (2) a daughter; (3) a daughter; (4) Elizabeth [d 1789] who married Rev William Northend.

He was buried at Heywood's Chapel

Hesselden
[Surname]

There are currently only around 3 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hesselden. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hesselden, Alfred
[1847-1???] Born in Ovenden. (Possibly) uncle of George Bedford Whitaker.

He was a brewer (possibly) at Grove Brewery; ale & porter brewer [1871]; ale brewer [1881]; a brewer [1891]; a brewer (worker) [1901].

He married Sarah [1845-1905].

Children: (1) John [b 1867]; (2) James [b 1870]; (3) Mary Jane [b 1872]; (4) Eliza Anne [b 1873]; (5) Emily [b 1875]; (6) Ellen [b 1877]; (7) Thomas [b 1879]; (8) Frank [b 1882]; (9) Sarah [b 1884]; (10) Harriet [b 1886] who married [1909] John Thomas.

The family lived at Grove, Midgley [1871, 1881]; next to Grove House, Midgley [1891]; 2 Brampton (next to Grove House) [1901]

Hesselden, Emmanuel
[18??-19??] Proprietor of the Perseverance Laundry, Elland [1905]

Hesselden, George
[1834-1899] Licensee of the Peacock, Warley [1874, 1899].

He died 8th November 1899 [aged 65]

Hesselgreaves, George E.
[18??-19??] Todmorden schoolmaster [1905]

Heton, Joan de
[12??-13??] A nun at Kirklees Nunnery. In 1315, she was one of a number of nuns accused of inappropriate behaviour. She was judicially convicted before the Archbishop of York of the crime of incest with Richard de Lathe and Sir Michael Scot, a priest, and penance was enjoined

Heton, Richard de
[1???-1389] Aka Heaton. Son of Henry of Heaton. Vicar of Halifax [1362].

In 1386, he was fined 12d for failing to attend the court at Wakefield.

At a time when surnames were in a state of flux, his brother's name was William Hanson.

See Hangingroyd House, Shibden and Upper Shibden Hall

Hewgill, Rev William
[18??-1???] Or Hugill. MA. He was educated at New College, London before becoming Minister at Warley Congregational Church [1856, 1861].

During his time at Warley, the old gallery of the school was demolished and The School Room at the bottom of Warley Town Lane was built.

In June 1865, he moved to Farnworth

Hewitson, George
[18??-18??] He was a worsted spinner in partnership with Luke Swallow Leyland [until 1851 when the partnership was dissolved]

Hewitt, Charles George
[1842-19??] Born in Saint Luke, Middlesex.

In 1879, he married Agnes Mainwaring in Stoke upon Trent.

They were teachers at Ripponden National School.

There are 2 windows in Ripponden Church in their memory.

He bequeathed money which was used to purchase the West Window in the Church

Hewitt, G. C.
[17??-18??] Of Ripponden. Around 1820, he wrote several works on making models from cardboard and paper

Hewitt, Joseph
[16??-16??] He married Anne, daughter of James Robinson.

Children: James

Hewitt, Peggy
[19??-] Local writer and member of the Halifax Authors' Circle. In 1985, she published These Lonely Mountains, a biography of the Brontë moors

Hewitt, Rev Walter Marshall
[18??-19??] MA.

He served at Sheffield before becoming Curate at All Souls' Church, Haley Hill [1893]

Hewley's: Lady Hewley's Charity
A charity which benefitted local churches including Bridge End Congregational Church, Brighouse and Moor End Congregational Church

Hewson, Brian
[19??-] Mayor of Todmorden [2005-2006]

Hewson, F.
[18??-19??] DCM.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the Lancashire Fusiliers.

In 1918, he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for initiative, leadership, and fighting spirit

Hey
The surname originated in Scammonden.

George Redmonds writes that Alan del Heye is recorded at Scammonden in 1333, and Robert del Heye is recorded at Barkisland in 1379

There are currently around 28 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hey. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Hey family of Hebden Bridge
See Saint James the Great Church, Hebden Bridge

Hey, Abraham Henry
[1854-1???] Born in Ringby.

He was a general servant [1881].

In 1877, he married Fanny, widow of George Bottomley.

Children: (1) child; (2) child.

The family lived at 25 New Street, Southowram [1881].

In 1881, Abraham Henry, Fanny were listed with 4 children named Bottomley and 2 named Hey

Hey & Company
Tailors & outfitters. They were at 33 Orange Street, Halifax [1905]

Hey, Ann
[1834-1???] Daughter of Benjamin Hey.

She was a worsted worker [1861]; a woollen weaver [1871].

In 1866, she had a son Hanson Gledhill Hey – father unknown.

The family were members of the Spiritualist Lyceum, Sowerby Bridge.

In 1871, Ann and her son were living at 40 Skircoat Green, Halifax, with her brother John Hey and his family.

In March 1874, she married Abbey Durio Wilson

Hey, Ayrton
[1853-1904] He was landlord of the Crown & Anchor, Mixenden [1898, 1904].

In 1888, he married Sarah Ann Crabtree [1850-1927] in Bradford.

He died 23rd October 1904.

After Ayrton's death, Sarah Ann took over at the Crown & Anchor [1905].

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1904

The couple were buried at Mount Zion Methodist Chapel, Ogden. A crown and anchor are engraved on the gravestone

Hey, Benjamin
[1798-18??] Born in Halifax.

He was a woollen spinner [1861]; a manufacturer [1874].

He married Ann [1808-18??].

Children: (1) John; (2) Ann; (3) Cornelius [b 1847].

The family lived at Skircoat Green Village [1861]

Hey's: Benjamin Hey & Son Limited
Woollen manufacturers. They were at Lower Skircoat Green [1936]

Hey, Charles Henry Davenport
[1833-1874] He was receiving officer for Halifax.

He married Martha Ann Blackburn [1831-1898] in Wakefield [Q3 1854].

Children: (1) Eliza Ann [1855-1858; (2) Herbert Blackburn [1864-1866].

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 3778]

Hey, Eneas
[17??-1???] A weaver of High Moss, Rishworth.

He married Unknown.

Children: Hannah who was baptised at Saint Bartholomew's Church, Dean Head [22nd July 1792]

Hey's Farm, Todmorden
Inchfield Road. Early 18th century house

Hey, Hanson Gledhill
[1866-1921] Illegitimate son of Ann Hey.

Born at Skircoat Green [30th August 1866].

When he was 7 years old, he fell from a London tram and injured his right knee. The limb had to be amputated 5 years later.

He was a bookbinder [1881]; a book gilder [1891]; a tobacconist.

He had a tobacconist's shop at 68 Crown Street, Halifax. He was the Honorary Secretary of the Tobacconists's Retailers Federation.

He was a Spiritualist. His shop was the first registered office of the Spiritualists' National Union which was founded in 1901.

In 1891, he married (1) Olive Haigh [1866-1898] in Halifax.

In 1903, he married (2) Ruth Holden [1866-1932] from Darwen, Lancashire, in Blackburn.

They had no children.

The family lived at 68 Crown Street, Halifax [1901, 1911]; 30 Glen Terrace, Halifax [1921].

Living with them in 1911 was Ruth's sister Edith Holden [aged 42] (housekeeper).

He died at 30 Glen Terrace, Halifax [28th February 1921]

Hey Head Farm, Lumbutts
Lumbutts Road. Late 17th century house and barn

Hey Head Green, Todmorden
On 24th August 1856, there was a large Chartist meeting here to congratulate John Frost on his return to Britain from his sentence of transportation. Frost attended the meeting

Hey, Inspector Eli
[1843-1883] Or Haigh.

He was police sergeant at Barnsley (for 5 years); at Queensbury (for 3½ years); at Dringhouses, near York (for 1 year). before becoming Police inspector at Brighouse [1876]. He was due to move to Holmfirth, but local householders in Brighouse petitioned that he stay here.

In 1877, he was a witness in the trial of Maria Kershaw.

He married Unknown.

Children: daughter.

On 5th October 1883, he attended a meeting at Huddersfield and caught a severe cold which

developed alarming symptoms of gastric derangement with fever

and died at Brighouse police station

Hey, J.
[18??-18??] Reed maker at Halifax.

In January 1862, he was declared bankrupt

Hey, James
[17??-1813] Luddite.

Son of a Methodist family.

He married Unknown [1793-18??].

Children: (1) child; (2) child.

In 1813, he, Joseph Crowther and Nathan Hoyle were convicted of robbing a dwelling house, and putting the persons therein in great fear. They were executed.

Shillitoe visited his widow

Hey, Job
[17??-18??] Of Greetland.

He married Sarah.

Children: (1) Susannah [b 1799]; (2) John [b 1803]; (3) William [b 1805]; (4) James [b 1808]; (5) Mary [b 1810]; (6) Ann [b 1812].

The children were all baptised at the Greetland Wesleyan Chapel

Hey, Job
[1771-1813] Or John. A cotton spinner at Greetland.

He was one of the members of a Luddite gang charged with stealing firearms from George Haigh. He had been recruited into the gang on account of his local knowledge that Haigh owned weapons. After the robbery, the pistol and 3¼ pounds of gunpowder were found in Hey's house.

Hey was hanged at 1:30 pm on 16th January 1813 at the Tyburn


Question: There appear to be several men called Job Hey around at this time. Please email me if you can clarify the entries or remove any confusion between the several Jobs

 

Hey, Job
[1792-1863] (Possibly) son of William Hey.

On 27th December 1813, he married Hannah Calverley [1794-1822] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Sarah [1814] who died in infancy; (2) William [1815-1827]; (3) Joseph [1818-1881]; (4) James [b 1821]; (5) Edward [1822] who died in infancy.

On 24th August 1823, he married (2) Sarah Bolton [1795-18??] at Elland Parish Church. Sarah was dead by 1861.

Children: (6) Abraham [b 1823]; (7) John [b 1827]; (8) Hannah [b 1830].

Job, Hannah and children Sarah, William, Joseph and Edward were buried at Saint Bartholomew's, Ripponden

Hey, John
[1???-18??] Son of John Hey.

He was a relieving officer.

He married Ann Davenport [1807-18??].

Children: (1) Ann Esther [1834-1908] who married John Hill; (2) John Edwards.

He was dead before 1851

Hey, John
[18??-18??] On 25th September 1803, he married Nancy, daughter of Benjamin Edwards.

Children: John.

He was dead before 1862

Hey, John
[1811-1871] He married Mary [1800-1875].

The couple were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery with

Sarah [1804-1885] and Samuel Robinson and Emily [1870-1920] and Herbert Robertshaw [1869-1927]

Hey, John
[1829-1???] Son of Benjamin Hey.

Born in Halifax.

He was a gardener & ag.lab [1861]; a wool weaver [1871].

He married (1) Harriet [1833-1857].

Children: (1) Hannah [b 1857].

He married (2) Unknown.

Children: (2) Sarah Ann [b 1866].

The family lived at 40 Skircoat Green, Halifax [1871].

Living with them in 1871 were his sister Ann and her son Hanson Gledhill

Hey, John Edwards
[1839-1890] Son of John Hey.

Born in Halifax.

He was a ventilating engineer in Halifax; a partner in Hill & Hey [1874]. In 1874, he and John Hill patented a design for improvements in ventilators.

His sister Ann Esther Hey married his partner John Hill.

On 9th August 1866, he married (1) Mary Ann Jenkinson [1843-1872].

In 1874, he married (2) Mary Elizabeth Jessup [1839-1???] in Banbury.

The family lived at Clare Hall Road, Halifax [1891].

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1891

Hey, Joseph
[18??-18??] Carpenter and joiner at Halifax.

He was declared bankrupt but this was annulled in November 1841

Hey, Joseph
[1826-1876] Born in Halifax.

He was a police officer in Liverpool [1849]; a police officer in Halifax [1851]; a police officer in Knottingley [1856]; a police officer in Cumberworth, Huddersfield [1859]; a police officer in Sedburgh, Yorkshire [1861]; a police officer in Bradford [1871]; (possibly) Police Inspector back in Halifax.

On 4th September 1849, he married (1) Margaret Formby [1825-1867] at Liverpool, Holy Trinity.


Margaret was born in Liverpool
 

Children: (1) George [b 1851]; (2) Walter [b 1853]; (3) Alfred [1856-1933]; (4) Eleanor [b 1858]; (5) Charles [b 1860]; (6) Fanny [1862-1939]; (7) Henry [b 1864].

Margaret died in Bradford.

On 24th February 1870, he married (2) Martha Habergham at Halifax Parish Church

They had no children.

The family lived at 34 Edward Street, Skircoat [1891].

Members of the family were buried at All Saints' Church, Dudwell: Joseph [11th August 1876]; Martha [6th July 1898]; Alfred [30th June 1933]; Fanny [7th October 1939]

Hey, Levi
[18??-18??] Of Hipperholme,

On 17th January 1867, he was returning home after drinking at the White Bear when he was attacked by 3 labourers, Thomas Barber, Samuel Sharp, and Joseph Anderton and robbed of 5/- and was then ill-used. The prisoners were discharged as it appeared that Hey was fresh at the time and could not identify his assailants

Hey, M.
[18??-19??] Partner in W. G. Hey & Son.

He lived at Park Place, Halifax [1905]

Hey, Paul
[17??-18??] Mercer and linen draper at the House at the Maypole, Halifax [1805]

Hey, Samuel
[1807-18??] Of Midgley.

In 1829, he married Betty Nicholl of Midgley, at Halifax Parish Church

In February 1834, he was sentenced to 1 month's imprisonment for selling his wife – with a halter round her neck – for 2/- in Halifax market on 30th November 1833.

At his trial, , Hey said that

he had sold her because she was a bad wife

The Chairman said

she might be so, and he had acted towards here like a bad husband, and if he had been an educated man, the sentence of the Court upon him would have been very different

He was imprisoned in the house of correction for 1 month

Hey's: T. Hey & Company
Tailors and clothiers at 33 Orange Street, Halifax. Late 19th century

Hey, Thomas
[18??-19??] He was Mayor of Halifax [1920-1922]

See Metz-en-Couture

Hey, Thomas Knowles
[1813-1891] Chemist and druggist of Hebden Bridge.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) David who became a chemist and druggist in Hebden Bridge; (2) Helen; (3) Jane.

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1891

Hey, W. G.
[18??-19??] Partner in W. G. Hey & Son.

He lived at First Avenue, Halifax [1905]

Hey's: W. G. Hey & Son
Joiners at undertakers at Ann Street, Halifax [1905]. Partners included W. G. Hey and M. Hey

Hey, William
[17??-18??] He (possibly) married Mary Law.

Children: (1) Job; (2) Hannah [1794-1850] who married Silvanus Habergham

Heygate, Rev Reginald Thomas
[1857-1947] MA.

He worked in Newfoundland. He returned to Britain and became curate at Leeds [1889-1893] and vicar of Honley before becoming Vicar of Saint Paul's Church, Halifax [1900]. He was appointed to Boston, Lincolnshire.

In 1890, he married Mary Archibald.


Mary's father was the Governor of Nova Scotia
 

They had no children.

He retired in 1923

Heyhead Farm, Mytholmroyd

Owners and tenants have included

Heyhurst, Richard
[15??-16??] Vicar of Coley [1623]

Heyhurst, Robert
[18??-19??] In 1880, he married Ruth in Halifax


Ruth was the daughter of
William Laycock and widow of Isaac Firth, in Halifax
 

Heys, Arthur D.
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the Machine Gun Corps.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Heys Clough, Warley
A valley and stream which runs off Warley Moor

Heys, Fred
[1869-1918] He was the father of the 3 illegitimate children of Ann Dickinson:

(1) Arthur [b 1894]; (2) Gertrude [1896-1897] who was drowned by her mother; (3) child [b 20th August 1897]. He did not marry Ann.

In 1897, Ann was pregnant with the 3rd child when she tried to commit suicide and drowned daughter Gertrude.

Heys was summoned for Bastardy and consented to an order of 3/- a week for the maintenance of the youngest child, and agreed to take charge of Arthur.

He was a cotton piece filler at a bleach works [1911].

On 7th March 1902, he married Mary Ann Beckett [1883-1948] at Saint Peter's, Walsden.


Mary Ann was born in Burnley
 

Children: (1) Harry [b 1904]; (2) Doris [b 1905]; (3) Edith [b 1906]; (4) Agnes [b 1909]; (5) Harriet Ann [b 1910].

The family lived at 729 Rochdale Road, Todmorden [1911].

Living with them at Walsden in 1911 was illegitimate son Arthur [aged 16] (cotton piece spinner) 

Heys's: Fred Heys & Son Limited
19/20th century billiard-table makers of Central Street, Halifax

Heys, James
[1???-1855] A travelling portrait painter. He died at the Northgate Hotel

Heywood's
Retailers of toys and fancy leather goods at 45 and 46 Halifax Borough Market [1915].

In 1915, the firm was advertised alongside Mewett & Heywood

Heywood, Eliezer
[1657-1730] Second son of Rev Oliver Heywood. Born at Northowram.

He was ordained and died whilst minister at Dronfield, Derbyshire.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) son; (2) son; (3) son; (4) son; (5) daughter; (6) daughter; (7) daughter; (8) daughter. A genealogy of the Heywood family is given in Oliver Heywood's Diaries.

Heywood's House, Northowram

Heywood, Rev James Walter
[18??-19??] He was vicar at Rochdale before becoming Vicar of Hebden Bridge [1926]. He was the first married vicar of the Parish. He resigned in 1955

Heywood, John
[1656-1704] Eldest son of Rev Oliver Heywood. Born at Northowram.

He was ordained and served at Rotherham, Pontefract, and died at Sheffield. A genealogy of the Heywood family is given in Oliver Heywood's Diaries.

Heywood, Nathaniel
[1633-1677] Brother of Rev Oliver Heywood. He was born in Bolton. He was Chaplain at Illingworth [1652-1656]. Around 1654, he married. He left to serve at Ormskirk. He was ejected in 1662. His brother published some of his sermons after his death.

See Matthew Smith

Heywood, Rev Oliver
[1630-1702] BA.

He was a popular and controversial Minister of Heywood's Chapel [1650].

The four volumes of his diaries and notebooks – edited by J. Horsfall Turner – give much detail about life in the district.

See Mrs Judith Higson, The Life & Works of Oliver Heywood, The Rev Oliver Heywood BA 1630-1702 and Poem by Rev John Fawcett

Heywood, Samuel
[17??-18??] A descendant of Oliver Heywood.

He was an attorney-at-law in Nottingham.

He married Ann [1753-1825].

Children: Anna who married Rev Richard Astley.

Ann died 5th October 1825. There was a memorial brass to her in Northgate End Chapel

Heyworth & Sutcliffe
Picker makers at Gauxholme.

The partnership was dissolved in December 1863

Heyworth, Arthur
[1???-194?] Of Todmorden.

During World War II, he served with the Lancashire Fusiliers.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Heyworth, Charles
[1809-1861] Son of Jeremiah Heyworth.

He, his father and brothers were all working stone masons, contractors, church and factory builders and so on.

He was a farmer, stone mason and merchant of Henshaw Barn Walsden; a quarryman employing 6 men and a farmer of 10 acres employing 1 man [1851].

He married Ann Fielden.

Children: (1) Charles; (2) William; (3) Jeremiah; (4) Grace; (5) Mary Ann; (6) Sarah; (7) John

Heyworth, Charles
[1815-1876] Of Clough, Walsden.

He took a leading part in the building of Walsden Church. In 1864, he had the contract for the erection of the spire

Heyworth, Frank
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Heyworth, Dr H.
[1???-18??] He lived at Pall Mall, Todmorden. Part of his garden – which originally extended from Meadow Lane to Bond Street – became York Place, Todmorden

Heyworth, J. H.
[18??-19??] Cotton manufacturer at Vale Mill, Todmorden [1905]

Heyworth, James
[1794-1862] Known as Jim o'Jer's. Son of Jeremiah Heyworth.

Born at Top of Hill.

He married Mary, daughter of Thomas Taylor.

Children: (1) John; (2) Charles; (3) Thomas; (4) Samuel; (5) Ann; (6) James; (7) Mary; (8) Jane; (9) Betty.

The family lived at Square in Walsden on their marriage.

He, his father and brothers were all working stone masons, contractors, church and factory builders and so on.

The family moved to Swineshead Clough in Langfield where he farmed and continued his stone quarrying and building business.

He was a farmer of 26 acres at Swineshead Clough employing 1 man and master mason employing 7 men [1851].

He opened a stone quarry on Langfield Moor above Carr Green in a place called Jail Hole

Heyworth, James W.
[1???-194?] Of Todmorden.

During World War II, he served with the Royal Armoured Corps.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Heyworth, Jeremiah
[1767-1830] Son of John Heyworth.

Born and died at Top o' th' Hill Farm, Walsden.

He married Betty, daughter of John Fielden of Bottomley

Children: (1) John; (2) James; (3) Jeremiah; (4) Abraham; (5) Samuel; (6) William; (7) Betty; (8) Charles; (9) Sally; (10) Mary; (11) Martha.

Jeremiah and his sons were all working stone masons, contractors, church and factory builders and so on

Heyworth, John
[17??-1???] He married Mary Emmot.

Children: (1) John; (2) Jeremiah

Heyworth, John
[1763-1802] Of General Wood Farm, Walsden. Son of John Heyworth.

He married Mally, daughter of John Fielden of Bottomley

Children: (1) Jeremiah; (2) James; (3) Betty; (4) Mary; (5) Thomas; (6) John; (7) Sally; (8) Zachariah; (9) Hannah.

After John's death, Mally went on to marry twice more: Abraham Crossley, then Robert Jackson

Heyworth, John B.
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the Royal Navy.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Heyworth, Samuel
[18??-18??] Cotton dealer at Gauxholme.

In November 1856, he was declared bankrupt

Heyworth, T.
[1799-1876] Of Woodhouse.

He was the Relieving officer at Todmorden. He was appointed when the Poor Law Act came into operation [1838], and held the post until his death

See Tim Cowbrain

Heyworth, Uttley Greenwood
[1843-1921] Born in Todmorden.

He was landlord of the Bridge Street Tavern, Sowerby Bridge [1911].

Around 1865, he married Eliza G. [1845-1937] from Sowerby.

Children: (1) child; (2) child; (3) Fred G. [b 1870] who was a loom tackler in a woollen mill [1911].

Living with them in 1911 were widowed son Fred and grandson Uttley Greenwood Heyworth [b 1896] who was an apprentice to iron trade

Heyworth, William
[1820-1???] Born in Bacup, Lancashire.

He was a boarding house & dining room keeper [1881].

Around 1852, he married Mary [1821-1???].


Mary was born in Bacup Lancashire
 

Children: (1) William [b 1852] who was a dining room attendant [1881] who married Nancy [b 1849]; (2) Mary [b 1856] who was an assistant [1881]; (3) Susannah [b 1859] who was a school teacher [1881]; (4) Arthur [b 1862] who was a chemist (unemployed) [1881]; (5) Sarah [b 1865] who was an apprentice dress maker [1881].

The family lived at 20/22 Southgate, Halifax [1881]

Hibbard, Thomas
[18??-19??] He was a Deacon at Blackley Baptist Chapel. In 1911, he was recorded as a Past Deacon

Hibbert, George
[1811-1859] Born in Ashton-under-Lyne.

He was a brickmaker [1841]; landlord of the Waggon & Horses, Rastrick [1851].

On 10th April 1839, he married Ellen Pratt [1810-1891] from Clifton, at Elland Church.

They had no children.

The family lived at Snake Hill, Rastrick [1841].

He died at the Lower George, Rastrick [19th August 1859].

Probate records show that he left effects valued at under £200. Probate was granted to his widow Ellen.

He was buried at Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse [21st August 1859].

Ellen was victualler at the Lower George [1861].

Living with Ellen in 1861 were her niece Ellen Pratt [aged 13] and lodger John Wilson [aged 25] (woollen dyer) was were.

In 1863, Ellen married Thomas Jubb

Hibbert, Walter
[1912-1973] MM.


Question: His epitaph shows him as Walter Hibbert M.M.. Does anyone know why he was awarded the Military Medal?

 

He married Helga [1926-2006].

The couple were buried at Saint Bartholomew's, Ripponden

Hickey, Rev J.
[19??-19??] Priest at Saint Patrick's Catholic Church, West Vale. In 1955, he was appointed parish priest at Huddersfield

Hicks, Herbert G.
[1848-1???] He was an assistant surgeon boarding with Ernest Hamerton [1871]

Hicks, Rev W. T.
[19??-????] Vicar of Saint Peter's Church, Walsden. In 1981, he was appointed vicar of Knottingley

Higgin Chamber, Boulderclough
Record as Hegynchawmbre in 1534.

Mid 17th century house.

Owners and tenants have included

Those who were born here have included Whiteley Turner [1866] and Tommy Whitaker [187?]

Higgin House, Southowram
Higgin Lane, Bank Top. Recorded in 1854, when it was shown on the north side of the lane

Higginbotham, Henry George
[1866-1???] Born in Hyde.

He was a cotton piecer [1895].

In 1895, he married Elizabeth Devevon in Stockport.


Elizabeth was the daughter of
Harry Denevon
 

Children: (1) Eliza Hannah [b 1896]; (2) Alice [b 1906]

Higgins
[Surname]

There are currently only around 3 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Higgins. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Higgins's: C. A. Higgins & Company
Manufacturing confectioners at Long Lover Lane, Pellon [1905].

See William Briggs Watson

Higgins, G.
[19??-] Curate at Brighouse [1963-1966]

Higgins, George
[1899-1985] BM, VM.

Son of Elizabeth [née Rowe] and Michael Higgins, of Todmorden

During World War I, he was under age when he enlisted and served with the Worcester Regiment.

He was taken prisoner by the Germans for the duration

Higgins, Joseph
[12??-12??] Tavern keeper at Halifax.

In December 1855, he was declared insolvent

High Bentley Farm, Shelf
Aka Lower Fold Farm

High Bentley Hall, Shelf
Green Lane.

Bentley Park is mentioned around 1275. The present house was a 15th century aisled house. The original timber building was cased in stone in 1661. The home of the Benteley family:

In the 17th century, it was occupied by Richard Wade and the Wade family of yeoman clothiers.

The lintel on an entrance doorway and plasterwork over the hall fireplace are inscribed RW IW 1661 for Richard Wade. There were Royal Arms of Charles II decorating the house.

In the later 17th century, it was occupied by Joseph Northend and passed down the family.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

It has been suggested that a part of the building was used as a chapel.

This is discussed in Aisled Houses in the Halifax Area, Ancient Halls in & about Halifax, Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions and The Old Halls & Manor Houses of Yorkshire.

See Low Bentley Hall, Lower Fold Farm, Shelf and Shelf petrifying well

High Brown Knowl Standing Stone, Wadsworth
A standing stone on High Brown Knowl, Wadsworth

High Brown Knowl, Wadsworth
Aka High Brown Knoll. At 1450 ft, this is the highest point at the eastern end of the Wadsworth district where it meets Midgley Moor.

Mesolithic flint tools and several examples of late Neolithic or Bronze Age rock art have been found here.

See Brown, High Brown Knowl Standing Stone, Wadsworth, Jackson's Ridge, Low Brown Knowl, Wadsworth and Wadsworth Law

High Cross Farm, Shelf
Owners and tenants have included

  • John Crowther [1881]

Named for Shelf High Cross which stood nearby

High Garth, Warley

High Gate Farm, Blackshawhead
Badger Lane. Early 18th century house

High Gate House, Colden
Highgate Lane. Late 17th century house

High Greenwood, Heptonstall
Owners and tenants have included

See Everilshaw, Heptonstall and The Greenwood family of High Greenwood

High Hirst, Wadsworth
16th century house.

Stood on the hillside above Birchcliffe Baptist Church.

Owners and tenants have included

The property was demolished after 1905

High House Farm, Hipperholme
Owners and tenants have included

  • Samuel Sharpe [1847, 1853]

High House Farm, Midgley
High House Lane. Farmhouse dated 1606.

The cross of the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem appears on the porch.

In February 1867, 180 stones of hay and 100 stones of straw belonging to farmer Mr Sutcliffe here had to be destroyed when the rinderpest (cattle plague) was detected here

High Hurst, Hebden Royd
When the house was demolished, a frieze dated 1629 was taken to Chantry House, Heptonstall

High Lee Green Co-Op
Branch #1 of the Luddendenfoot Industrial Co-operative Society opened around 1872 at High Lee Green

High Lee Green Cricket Club, Luddendenfoot
To the right of the pavilion is a field with a pond, known locally as The Dam.

After the last match of the season, or when the club celebrates a championship triumph or a cup victory, club members have been known to celebrate by jumping in the dam

See Luddendenfoot Cricket Club

High Lee, Luddenden
The surname Hiley originated here

High Lee Railway Dam, Luddendenfoot
Dam which supplied the water troughs for the railway

See High Lee Green Cricket Club, Luddendenfoot

High Lees, Midgley

Owners and tenants have included

High Level Railway
Railway line which ran from Saint Paul's station through a cutting to Pellon Station across the valley on the Wheatley viaduct through the Wheatley Tunnel between Wheatley and Ovenden, and on to Holmfield.

Built by the Halifax High Level Railway Company.

Construction began in 1883.

The first section from Holmfield to Pellon was opened to goods traffic on 1st August 1890. The section for Holmfield to Saint Paul's opened for passengers on 5th September 1890.

At Holmfield, the line joined the Halifax-Queensbury and Bradford-Keighley line of the Great Northern Railway from North Bridge Station - via Old Lane Tunnel and Lee Bank Tunnel – to Ovenden.

A station at Wheatley was planned but never built.

In July 1894, the line was acquired by the Great Northern Railway Company, and the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Company.

The line closed for passengers on 31st December 1917. It was then a freight-only line.

The line was revived after World War I, and withdrawn on 1st January 1927.

The line finally closed for goods in June 1960, when Holmfield station closed.

The line was dismantled.

See James Booth, James Ryder Butler, Old Station House, Ovenden and Station Hotel, Holmfield

High Moor, Soyland
See James Riley

High Rough, Hebden Bridge

High Rough, Midgley Moor
A Mesolithic site. A Bronze Age earthwork containing human bones was found here

High Royd Bridge, Luddendenfoot
Bridge #3 over the Rochdale Canal near Luddendenfoot

High Royd Farm, Barkisland

High Royd Farm, Boothtown
Old Bradford Road

High Royd, Halifax
Pepper Hill / Bradford Old Road. 17th century house.

Owners and tenants have included

High Royd, Warley
Owners and tenants have included

The property was demolished in 1961

High Saltonstall, Warley

High Sunderland Farm, Halifax
Recorded in January 1914, when Abraham Crossley was a licensed horse slaughterer here.

See High Sunderland, Halifax

High Sunderland, Halifax
17th century house which stood at Horley Green, overlooking the Shibden Valley. It was built around 1629 for the Sunderland family. It was demolished in 1951 See High Sunderland Farm and Lower High Sunderland

High Town field, Elland
Aka Highest Town Field. A part of mediæval Elland. Recorded in 1750

High Trees Hall, Barkisland
Dog Lane. Owned by the Ramsden family. Thomas Ramsden lived here in 1524. Dated IR 1678 for John Ramsden. It is now 2 private dwellings

The High Trees, Skircoat
Heath Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

High Wicken Farm, Higher Inchfield
See Moorcock Farm, Higher Inchfield

Higham & Chambers
Brighouse law firm. Partners included Thomas Bradbury Chambers

Higham, Eastwood
Dyke Lane. Originally known as Rougham. Mid 17th century house.

An early 18th century barn is listed

Higham, George
[1801-1860] Born in Castleford.

He became a solicitor in Brighouse. He specialised in public business and matters relating to the railways. He was one of a number of attorneys who were

commissioned for taking acknowledgements of deeds executed by married women

He was Clerk to the trustees of the Bradford & Huddersfield Turnpike Trust (on the death of Greenwood Bentley of Bradford).

He married Ann [1802-1858] from Littleborough.

Children: (1) Emily [1825-1893] who married John Brooke; (2) George William; (3) Sarah; (4) Thomas [1834-1861]; (5) John [1836-1859]; (6) James Rhodes [1839-1863].

The family lived at Bonegate House [1851].

He was once playing with an infant son and caused the child to start laughing. The laughter could not be stopped and they called a doctor. The doctor could not calm the child down and he died of the attack.

There is a memorial to Anne & George in Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse

See Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse

Higham's: George Higham & Son
Brighouse solicitors established by George Higham and George William Higham

Higham, George William
[1827-1853] Son of George Higham. He was a partner in George Higham & Son.

He died after 12 days' illness in his 26th year.

There is a memorial to him in Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse

Higham, James
[1857-1911] Born in Preston, Lancashire.

He was a beerhouse keeper at the Alma, Cottonstones [1891]; a launderer [1901]. His wife Frances was a laundress [1901], and a laundry proprietress high class [1911].

In 1882, he married Frances Alice Hibberd [1866-1???] from Manchester, in Skipton.

Children: Isabella [b 1883] who was a school teacher [1901].

The family lived at Water Houses, Soyland [1901]; Waterhouses, Ripponden [1911]

Higham, John
[17??-18??] Stocking manufacturer in Copper Street, Halifax [1816]

Higham, John Sharp
[1857-1932] Liberal MP for Sowerby [1904-1918].

On 1st July 1907, his son was seriously injured by falling out of a railway carriage

Higham, Richard
[17??-18??] In [Q4] 1838, he married Margaret Anne Richardson in Halifax.


Margaret Anne was the daughter of
Henry Richardson
 

Children: (1) Joe [b 1840]; (2) Mary [b 1842] who married Herman Lucius.

He was dead by 1861

Higham, Sarah
[1829-1859] Daughter of George Higham. She was the first child to be baptised at Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse.

She married Joshua Tolson

Higher Allescholes, Walsden
Allescholes Road.

See Allescholes, James Baron Fielden, Samuel Baron Fielden, Lower Allescholes, Walsden and The Baron family of Walsden

Higher Ashes Cottage, Cross Stone
Stands just north of Higher Ashes.

Laithe-house dated 1854. The barn is also listed

Higher Ashes, Cross Stone
Todmorden. Aka Upper Ashes, Uppermost Ashes [1684].

This is said to be the finest example of a yeoman clothier's house in the Todmorden district.

A fireplace is dated WSS 1682, and there is a datestone WSS 1691 for William and Sarah Sutcliffe and the Sutcliffe family.

Another stone is inscribed WS set 1673.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

A former cottage – with a lintel inscribed IS 1714 – is now an outbuilding. This is listed.

It is now 3 private dwellings.

The nearby cottage and barn are listed.

Lower Ashes is nearby

Higher Birks, Walsden
Crossley New Road. Late 17th century house.

Owners and tenants have included

Higher Colden, Heptonstall
Colden Lane. Mid 17th century house.

See Less Colden Farm, Heptonstall

Higher Eastwood, Todmorden
7 & 8 Eastwood Lane. A small group of 17th century cottages behind Eastwood Old Hall. A datestone is inscribed John Eastwood 1630 IC

See Eastwood

Higher Greenwood Lee, Heptonstall

See Greenwood Lee, Heptonstall

Higher Hanging Shaw, Todmorden
Sourhall Road.

The early 18th century field barn for Lower Hanging Shaw, Todmorden is nearby

Higher Hartley, Todmorden
Farm.

Now derelict.

Lower Hartley still exists

Higher House, Cragg Vale
Tenter Hill Lane. Built around 1666.

A row of 16 bee-boles set into a wall to the west of the house are listed

Higher House Moor Monolith
Standing stone about 15 ft long on Higher House Moor, Mytholmroyd. It now leans at an angle

Higher House Moor, Mytholmroyd
Aka Turley Holes Moor, Erringden, Erringden Moor

Moorland named for Higher House, Mytholmroyd.

Yorkshire Water – with a grant from the National Lottery – are restoring the moorland.

See Hove Yard Wood, Mytholmroyd

Higher House, Mytholmroyd
House dated WSN 1666.

Gives its name to Higher House Moor

Higher House Wood, Cragg Vale

Higher Knowl, Walsden
See Hollinrake family of Higher Knowl

Higher Langfield Farm, Todmorden
Late 17th century property – Numbers 5 & 6 Rough Side Lane, Higher Langfield Farm, and the attached barn - are listed

Higher Lee, Lumbutts
Lee Lane. 2 early 19th century cottages

Higher Murgatshaw Farm, Stansfield
Shaw Lane. 17th century building with later alterations. A barn was added in 1851.

Owners and tenants have included

Higher Needless, Hebden Bridge

Higher New Yard, Stainland
Dog Lane. Late 17th / 18th century house formerly known as New Yard.

Owners and tenants have included

Higher Oldfield Farm, Luddenden
Built in 1??? Demolished in 19??. The barn has been converted into a house

Higher Scout Farm, Walsden
Bottomley Road. Early 19th century laithe-house with added cottages.

See Samuel Fielden and Lower Scout, Walsden

Higher Speed Metals Limited
A subsidiary of Marshall's (Halifax) Limited

Higher Stoodley Cottage, Langfield
Lee Bottom Road. House dated IS 1744.

Higher Stoodley Farm, Langfield
Lee Bottom Road. House built around 1770.

Similar to Horsfall House.

Owners and tenants have included

See Lower Stoodley Farm

Higher Underbank House, Hebden Bridge
Charlestown. Built around 1770.

There is an enigmatic carving – see photograph – above a [now blocked-up] window.

See Underbank House, Hebden Bridge

Higher Woodfield Farm, Todmorden

Owners and tenants have included

See Lower Woodfield Farm, Todmorden

Higher Wormald, Rishworth
Laithe-house dated 1796 WJ

Owners and tenants have included

Highfield Astronomical & Meteorological Society
The society held their meetings at William Richardson's observatory in the 19th century.

Members included Samuel Baines (who kept a record of the Society's proceedings in a minute book

Highfield Cottages, Southowram
Pinnar Lane. A group of cottages originally called Laverock Hall, Southowram.

William Richardson lived here and had an observatory here.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

There is a carved stone head set into a niche in the southern gable of the building

Highfield Farm, Southowram
Pinnar Lane. Property dated 1677.

The rear barn was probably an early 16th century house.

Owners and tenants have included

Advertisements published in January 1864 ran

Announcement of Auction Sale at Highfield Farm, Southowram for Mr Midgley.

Sale of Milch cows, 300 stones of capital hay, 100 stones of straw, 25 tons manure

and

TO LET. Highfield Farm, Southowram. Farmhouse, barn, mistal and 19 days work of land

Apply Mr Aspinall, Hall Ings, Southowram

On 21st October 1901, 21st October 1901, Mrs Jane Kaye was gored to death by a bull at the farm.

The farm is now 2 private dwellings

Highfield, Hipperholme
Bramley Lane. House designed by William Ives. He lived at the house.

The head office of W. & J. Glossop Limited was here [1936]

Highfield House, Elland
Newcombe Street, Elland or Exley Lane, Exley.

Owners and tenants have included

Highfield House, Halifax
Halifax Constitutional Club was here [1921]

See John Berry

Highfield Observatory, Southowram
Pinnar Lane.

William Richardson had an observatory at Highfield Cottages. There was a large hand-operated astronomical telescope.

The sides of the tower of the square Observatory were aligned to face the 4 points of the compass. There was a well at the south-east corner to give sufficient height for barometers to be calibrated.

The observatory was the meeting place for The Highfield Astronomical & Meteorological Society.

The observatory was used as a workshop and then demolished in the late 1960s.

This is discussed in Our Home & Country

Highfield Pit Farm, Southowram
An early name for Pit Farm, Southowram

Highfield, Southowram
Pinnar Lane. This area is almost the highest point at Southowram. The war memorial is at the very highest point.

William Richardson lived at Highfield here

Highlands, Halifax
Lawrence Road.

It was built in 1909 for George Edward Mallett by Walsh & Nicholas.

Recorded in 1911, when it was listed as Highlands, Greenroyd, Halifax

Highley
Another form of the surname is Hiley

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

George Redmonds writes that the name originated at High Lee, Luddenden.

There are various spellings. Hugh de Hilylee is recorded at Sowerby in 1331, Thomas Hilele is recorded at Sowerby in 1379, Thomas de Hylegh is recorded at Sowerby, Richard de Hylelegh is recorded at Clifton in 1391, Thomas Hyleleghe is recorded at Sowerby in 1456, Edward Hylelee is recorded at Sowerby in 1538 and Edward Hiley is recorded at Luddenden in 1642.

Branches of the family moved to Highley Hall, Clifton around 1390

There are currently around 33 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Highley. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Highley's: A. E. Highley & Sons
Plumbers and glaziers established by Albert Edward Highley.

In 1936, they were at 285 Warley Road, Halifax, 196 Pellon Lane, Halifax, and 69-73 Crossley Terrace, Halifax

Highley, Albert Edward
[1878-1935] Son of Walter Highley.

He was a plumber (employer) [1911].

He established A. E. Highley & Sons

On 14th February 1903, he married Annie Lumb [1877-1948] of Sowerby, at Halifax.

Children: (1) Amy Vera; (2) George Frederick [b 1909]; (3) Donald; (4) Dorothy.

The family lived at 285 Warley Road, Halifax [1936]

Highley, Alfred Cooper
[1834-1894] Son of John Highley.

He was a book keeper/accountant.

He moved to Bradford where he worked for John Simonett & Sons, Ivory Comb Manufacturers.

On 18th June 1861, he married Sarah Ann [1843-1897], daughter John Simonett at Bradford Cathedral

Highley, Charles
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the East Lancashire Regiment.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Highley, Charles W.
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the Lancashire Fusiliers.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Highley, Ernest J.
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the Devonshire Regiment.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Highley, Fred
[18??-19??] Of Clay Bank House, Halifax.

He married Unknown.

Children: Kate who married Norman Frederick Smagg Winter

Highley, Fred
[1866-19??] Born in Halifax.

He was hotel proprietor at the Union Cross Hotel, Halifax [1911].

In [Q1] 1892, he married Martha Elizabeth Turner [1872-1???] from Halifax, in Halifax.

Children: Kate [b 1894]

Highley, George Henry
[1834-1878] Son of Henry Holt Highley. He went into the family business, Henry Highley & Sons. He was a partner in T. R. Sutcliffe & Sons [1865].

He married Mary, daughter of Samuel Walker.

Children: (1) Samuel; (2) George; (3) Frances Mary who married Richard Edgar Horsfall; (4) Leonard.

The family lived at Green Bank, Hipperholme [18??]

Highley, George Thomas
[1886-1915] Son of Joseph Highley.

He was an apprentice joiner wheelwright [1901]; a labourer in the hydraulic department of the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Company [1915].

On 12th August 1915, he was killed at Kirkgate Station, Wakefield.

He was on his way to Goole with a group of other workmen. They changed at Wakefield, and, contrary to regulations, crossed the lines to go to the engine shed, where they intended having breakfast. A goods train was standing in the siding, and one of the party got safely through the waggons of the train, but while George Thomas was underneath, the train set in motion, and he was killed.

The Coroner's jury returned a verdict of Accidental death

Highley, George Walker
[1865-1923] Son of George Henry Highley. Nephew of Walter Walker.

In 1923, he was head of Watson Brothers.

He died at 2 Queensgate, Halifax.

He was buried at All Saints' Church, Dudwell

Highley Hall, Clifton
Aka Highley Hall Farm. The Highley family of Sowerby moved to Clifton around 1390. The house was originally called Crosse Hall.

In 1391, Richard de Hylelegh was the Parish Constable of Clifton.

The present hall is dated RH 1632 although parts are likely to be older.

Owners and tenants have included

There are stories of a poltergeist – a small girl – at the Hall.

See Highley and Thomas de Hylegh

Highley's: Henry Highley & Sons
Card makers established by Henry Holt Highley in 1858 when his partnership in Leyland & Highley was dissolved.

They had business at Croft Mills, Halifax, at Savile Mills, Halifax and at Lindley

Highley, Henry Holt
[1809-1893] JP.

Son of James Highley.

He was a partner in Leyland & Highley [1845, 1849]; a card maker at Ward's End, Halifax [1849]; a partner in T. R. Sutcliffe & Sons [1865]. In 1858, he established Henry Highley & Sons.

He married Frances, daughter of Mr Sutcliffe.

Children: (1) George Henry; (2) Thomas Sutcliffe.

The family lived at Clare Road, Halifax [1890].

He died at his home on Clare Road

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1893

Highley, Rev Herbert
[1866-1944] Third son of Thomas Sutcliffe Highley.

Born in Halifax [24th August 1865].

He was educated at Rugby School and Trinity College Cambridge.

In the years 1898-1900, he played cricket for Hertfordshire in the Minor Counties Championships.

On 14th November 1895, he married Katie, daughter of Joshua Wilson at Saint Matthew's, Rastrick

Highley, Horace
[1891-1915] Son of Joseph Highley.

In October 1912, he married Emily Webster in Halifax.


Emily was the daughter of William Webster
 

During World War I, he served as a Lance Corporal with the 1st & 4th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He died of wounds in France [22nd December 1915].

He was buried in the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium [II B 21A].

After his death, Emily married James Edward Bradbury

Highley, James
[1776-1849] Of Halifax.

He was a bailiff; a clerk; a writer; Assistant Overseer for Halifax; Vestry Clerk.

On 31st January 1802, he married Ellen (Ellin) Settle. at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) William Frederick; (2) Mary [1804-1885]; (3) John; (4) Henry Holt; (5) Ellen [1812-1819]; (6) Sarah Ann [1815-1849]; (7) Samuel Matthew [1817-1877]; (8) Ellen [1819-190?]; (9) Harriot [b 1821]; (10) Eliza [1824-1882]; (11) child

Highley, James Riley
[1824-1875] Son of William Frederick Highley. On 19th October 1854, he married his cousin Lucy Ann Highley in Halifax.

Children: (1) Lucie Annie [1856-1857]; (2) Kate [1857-1858]; (3) child [1858] who died at birth; (4) Ada Elizabeth [1860-1860].

His wife died just one month before their fourth child Ada Elizabeth died.

After Lucy Ann's death, he spent some time in London before emigrating to New Zealand.

He died in New Zealand [1st February 1875]

Highley, James Settle
[1807-1891] Son of James Highley.

Born in Halifax.

He became an accountant. He was a law stationer at George Street, Halifax [1850].

In 1842, he married Meliora Seward [1811-1870] from Birmingham, in Halifax.


In 1841, Melina [Meliora?] Seward [aged 25], (milliner), not born in Yorkshire, was living with the family of John Hebden [aged 77], (coal agent), in Old Market, Halifax
 

Children: (1) Jane Seward; (2) Philip [b 1847]; (3) Robert; (4) Harry [b 1852] who was a solicitor's general clerk [1871]

The family lived at 2 George Street, Halifax [1851]; 3 Haugh Shaw Cottage, Haugh Shaw Terrace, Halifax [1861]; Brunswick Street, Halifax [1871]; Wensley Place, Ripon with his married daughter, Jane, [1881]

Highley, Jane Seward
[1845-1???] Daughter of James Settle Highley.

In 1867, she married William Hall Child.

In 1870, after her husband's death, she married Frederick Mather King

Highley, John
[1805-1889] Son of James Highley.

He was a builder and joiner employing 13 men [1850s]; in partnership with his brother Samuel Matthew Highley [1817-1877] who was a joiner. He built many houses in the Skircoat area.

On 30th January 1833, he married (1) Sabina Cooper [1810-1843] at Halifax Parish Church.


Sabina was the daughter of Sabina [née Storey] and Isaac Cooper
 

Children: (1) Alfred Cooper; (2) Lucy Ann; (3) Oliver [1838-1862]; (4) Sabina [1840-1920]; (5) Walter [1842-1842]. On 12th April 1848, he married (2) married Caroline Shaw in Halifax.

Children: (5) Kate [b 1849]; (6) Walter; (7) Frances Ellen [b 1852]; (8) John [b 1853]; (9) Charles [b 1857]; (10) Louie [b 1861]; (11) Fred [b 1886]; (12) Blanche [b 1867]

Highley, John
[1835-1908] He was a wire drawer.

On 4th September 1859, he married Emma Holt in Halifax


Emma was the daughter of
John Holt
 

They had no children.

They adopted adopted their niece Clara Holt when her father, Emma's brother Joshua died.

Emma died 28th April 1915

Highley, John H.
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the East Lancashire Regiment.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Highley, Joseph
[1860-1???] Son of Thomas Highley, weaver.

Born in Halifax.

He was a cotton spinner of Lorne Street, Halifax [1881]; a dyer's labourer [1891]; a colour grinder (oil cloth works) [1901, 1911].

In [Q2] 1881, he married Charlotte Elizabeth Thomas [1862-1???] at Halifax Parish Church.


Charlotte Elizabeth, of 5 Swift's Road, Gibbet Lane, Halifax, was born in East End, London, the daughter of James Thomas, cigar maker
 

Children: (1) Clara Adelaide [b 1881] who was a worsted rover [1901]; (2) George Thomas; (3) James Wallace [b 1888] who was a worsted doffer [1901], a machine fitter (carpet manufacturer) [1911]; (4) Horace.

The family lived at 18 Lorne Street, Halifax [1891]; 18 Grove Street, Sowerby Bridge [1901]; 18 Grove Street, Bolton Brow, Sowerby Bridge [1911]; Sowerby Bridge [1915]

Highley, Leonard
[1874-1917] Son of George Henry Highley.

He was a worsted coating manufacturer [1911]; a partner in Myers & Highley [until 1911]

Later, he was in partnership with Frederick George Wilson as Wilson & Highley, worsted spinners at Peel Mills, Bingley. The partnership was dissolved in October 1913

Highley, Lucy Ann
[1836-1860] Daughter of John Highley.

She married her cousin James Riley Highley in Halifax.

She died just one month before their fourth child Ada Elizabeth died.

After Lucy Ann's death, her husband spent some time in London before emigrating to New Zealand where he died [1st February 1875]

Highley, Reuben
[1805-1878] Known as Old Wraggs Son of Thomas Highley.

Born in Walsden.

He married Betty Hudson.

Children: (1) Hannah; (2) Sally; (3) John; (4) James; (5) Mary.

The family lived at Nicklety.

John Travis says

Reuben was a hand weaver in his youth, and then took to outdoor labouring before obtaining a permanent job for his uncles at Foulclough Coalpits. He was employed to mend and keep the road to the pits in good repair. He was not known for his intellect, but was a lively man, especially when on a spree. He would entertain everyone with a good rousing song

Highley, Robert
[1850-1921] Son of James Settle Highley.

He was an accountant's clerk [1871]; a public accountant [1881].

In 1874, he married Eliza Pickup [1850-1???] in Pontefract.

Children: (1) Meliora [b 1876]; (2) Daisy [b 1878] who married George Frederick Sugden.

The family lived at 1 Upper Brunswick Street, Halifax [1881]; 28 Clifton Road, Skircoat [1891, 1901].

He died at 23 Savile Crescent, Halifax.

He was buried at All Saints' Church, Dudwell [15th November 1921]

Highley, Samuel Matthew
[1817-1877] Son of James Highley.

He was a joiner; (possibly) in partnership with his brother John Highley

Highley's: Samuel W. Highley & Company
Worsted-spinning business established in 1913 by Samuel Walker Highley at Union Mills, Halifax

Highley, Samuel Walker
[18??-1942] Son of George Henry Highley.

He was a partner on Walter Walker & Company. In 1910, there was a court case in which he tried to stop Douglas, son of Walter Walker, being brought into the business. Samuel lost and the partnership was dissolved in 1913. He established Samuel W. Highley & Company in the same year.

He died at Harrogate

Highley, Thomas
[1???-1???] Of Clifton.

He married the elder daughter of Stephen Ellis. Ellis disapproved of him

Highley, Thomas
[1779-18??] Illegitimate son of Mary Highley [1762-1820] who went on to marry Samuel Scholfield a few years later.

He was brought up at Naze Farm, Walsden with his mother and stepfather, and his step-siblings.

He married Sally, daughter of John Haigh.

Children: (1) Ann; (2) John; (3) Reuben; (4) Mary; (5) Haigh; (6) Jenny; (7) Betsy; (8) Esther; (9) James; (10) Joseph; (11) Sally.

The couple were given the tenancy of her father's farm at Vicarage on Inchfield.


John also gave them a wedding present of 3 stirks to start them off.

Shortly after their marriage Sally and Thomas had a major row which resulted in Sally leaving home. She walked all the way across Inchfield Moor driving the 3 stirks in front of her, back to the old home at Pastureside and her parents. It was 3 days before her husband came looking for her, and when John started to chastise him for behaving badly towards his daughter, Thomas stood his ground and put his side of the story forward. John then sent Sally and her husband packing back to Vicarage with the 3 stirks.

She never ran away again and they raised a large family, later retiring to Nicklety

 

The couple farmed at Vicarage, then by 1841 they had moved to Castleton (Rochdale) where he was a farmer

Highley, Thomas Sutcliffe
[1837-1896] JP.

Son of Henry Holt Highley.

He was a card maker. He went into the family business, Henry Highley & Sons.

He married Esther Jane, daughter of Ashton Stansfield.

Children: (1) (possibly) Henry Ashton [b 1862] who became a solicitor; (2) William; (3) Herbert; (4) (possibly) Bertram [b 1876] who was a card maker. He lived at Glenwood, Southowram, Rockville, Halifax [1895], and 17 Savile Crescent, Halifax [1896].

He died at Ripon.

Members of the family are mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1896

Highley, Walter
[1850-1930] Son of John Highley.

He was a plumber; a printer/compositor.

On 15th April 1875, he married Ellen Clarkson.

Children: (1) Fred [b 1876]; (2) Albert Edward; (3) Charles H [b 1880]; (4) Robert [b 1882]; (5) Ethel M [b 1884]; (6) Walter [b 1886]; (7) Nelly [b 1888]; (8) Eunice [b 1890]

Highley, William
[1864-1899] Son of Thomas Sutcliffe Highley. He went into the family business, Henry Highley & Sons.

He married Jessie, daughter of James Ambler.

Children: Mabel [1892-1932] who married George Bertram Holdsworth

Highley, William Frederick
[1802-1857] Son of James Highley.

He succeeded his father as assistant Overseer and Vestry Clerk

On 5th June 1823. he married Mary Ann Riley, at Halifax Parish Church.


Mary Ann was the daughter of Mary and James Riley
 

Children: (1) James Riley; (2) Henry [b 1825]; (3) Frederick [b 1827]; (4) William [b 1830]; (5) Walter [1831-1833]; (6) Edwin [b 1833]; (7) Elizabeth [b 1835]; (8) Arthur 1837-1878]; (9) Mary Ann [b 1839]; (10) George Walter 1841-1842]

Highroad Well
Area of Calderdale to the west of Halifax.

Named for wells & springs in the area.

Earlier names include Aredwell [1546], Harewood Well, Harod Well, Harrod Well, Harwood Well, and Herdwell [1775].

See Golden Lion, Halifax, Horse & Jockey, Halifax, The Wells, Highroad Well and Wellesley Barracks

Highroad Well Moor
Part of the Manor of Skircoat.

The Savile family had quarries here.

See Warley Clough and West View Park

Highroad Well Post Office
Recorded in 1905 at 440 Gibbet Street

Highroad Well Smallpox Hospital

Higson, Rev Ernest
[18??-19??] Minister at Wainsgate Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge [1910-1915]

Higson, Mrs Judith
[16??-1???] Of Northowram.

In May 1683, her son was

stricken with a strange distemper which left him swollen and insensible

Dr Thornton diagnosed that the illness was unnatural and prescribed a cake, made of wheatmeal and horseshoe stumps mixed with the boy's urine and hair, to make the witch reveal herself. Mrs Higson was a member of Heywood's congregation and he recommended that she fast and pray for her son's recovery

Hilbert Brothers
Furniture removers and hay, straw and corn merchants at Union Street South, Halifax [1915].

See William Hilbert

Hilbert, William
[1876-19??] Born in Dublin.

He was a hay & corn merchant (employer) [1911].

In [Q2] 1902, he married Ellen Helliwell [1877-19??] from Halifax, in Halifax.

Children: (1) James [b 1904]; (2) Emma [b 1907].

They lived at 36 Clare Road, Halifax [1911].

Living with them in 1911 was brother James Hilbert [b 1874] (wholesale fruit merchant), and boarder Joseph Helliwell [aged 30] (house painter).

See Hilbert Brothers

Hilditch, Geoffrey
[1933-] OBE, FIMechE.

General Manager of Halifax Passenger Transport [1963]

See Halifax Passenger Transport

Hildred, Norman
[1911-1936] Son of Sarah [née Ann] and William E.

He died 15th June 1936.

There is a memorial at Christ Church, Pellon, from Wainstalls and Mixenden bus patrons, a token of respect from the Halifax Bus & Tramways Department


Question: Does anyone know how Norman died, or the motivation behind the memorial?

 

Hiley
A variant of the surname Highley

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently only around 9 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hiley. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hiley, C. J.
[18??-19??] Organist at Heptonstall Parish Church for 43 years until 26th August 1909

Hiley, Harold
[18??-191?] Of Todmorden.

During World War I, he served with the West Riding Regiment.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered in the Todmorden Garden of Remembrance

Hiley, James
[1784-1836] Son of John Hiley.

He was a surgeon.

In 1804, he married Ann Walker [1784-1836] in Elland.

Children: (1) Mary [1804-1834]; (2) Nanny [1807-1860] who married [1829] John Edward Ogden [1809-18??]; (3) Sarah Walker [1809-1884] who did not marry; (4) John Simeon; (5) James; (6) Simeon [1819-1871]; (7) Emma [1824-1886] who did not marry.

Most of the family were buried at Elland Parish Church

Hiley, James
[1813-1877] Son of James Hiley

He was Medical Officer for Elland-cum-Greetland [1845, 1865, 1874].

He never married.

He lived in Southgate, Elland with his sisters: Sarah Walker, Emma and Nanny [1841, 1851, 1861, 1871]

Hiley, John
[1754-1830] He married Grace [1752-1828].

Children: James.

Grace and John were buried at Elland Parish Church

Hiley, Rev John Simeon
[1811-1865] MA, BD.

Son of James Hiley.

Born in Elland.

Baptised at Trinity College Dublin [1811].

He was a Fellow of Saint John's College Cambridge and curate of Quorndon & Woodhouse, Leicestershire [1857].

He trained and qualified as a doctor but became a clergyman

In 1845, he married (1) Ann Christiana Watkinson [1796-1849] at Barrow upon Soar, Leicestershire.

In 1858, he married (2) Mary [1825-1888] in Otley. Mary was born in Laleham, Middlesex, the daughter of Mary [née Penrose] [1791-1873] and Dr Thomas Arnold [1795-1842], headmaster of Rugby School. She was widow of Alfred Twining, of Gray's Inn, London, whom she had married [1847] at Kendal.

Children: (1) Arnold James Watkinson [1858-1929] who became a clergyman; (2) Louis Richard Trevenen [1862-1897].

In June 1868, after John Simeon's death, his widow Mary married Rev Robert Hayes [1838-1888] who succeeded John Simeon as curate of Woodhouse, Leicestershire.

On the death of Rev Hayes, his stepson, Rev Arnold James Watkinson Hiley became Vicar of Woodhouse

Hiley, Joseph
[1821-1???] He was a cotton warper; a cotton manufacturer employing 8 men, 1 woman and 3 boys at Hall Ing Mill in Todmorden [1861]; a book keeper [1871]; a commercial traveller [1881].

In 1843, he married Mary Ann Lord [1825-1???].

Children: Elizabeth Ann [b 1844] who married William Law.

The family lived at Knowlwood in Walsden; 9 Patmos, Todmorden; Brook Street, Todmorden [1861]; Wellington Road, Todmorden [1871]; Castleton (Rochdale) [1881]

Hiley, Samuel
[1805-1840] Of Halifax.

He was a member of the Oddfellows.

He lived at Lister Lane, Halifax [1840].

He was buried at Sion Congregational Church, Halifax

Hiley, Thomas
[1869-19??] Born in Brighouse.

He was a cotton twiner [1901]; a cotton spinner [1911].

In 1900, he married Sarah Jane, daughter of Alfred Sugden, in Halifax.

The family lived at the Horse & Jockey, Brighouse with Sarah's parents [1901]

Hill ...
The entries for people with the surname Hill are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

The Hill family of Halifax & Soyland

Hill's: Albert Hill & Company
Woollen, Italian cloth and general trimming merchants established by Albert Hill at Tower Buildings, Halifax.

In 1905, they were at Powell Street, Halifax

Hill & Heginbottom
Halifax leather merchants [1905]. Partners included Mr Hill and Ralph Heginbottom

Hill & Hey
In 1871, the ventilating engineering business founded by Charles Watson business became Hill & Hey. Partners included John Hill and John Edwards Hey.

In 1874, they were at Bond Street, Halifax.

In 1882, Watson retired and John Edwards Hey became sole proprietor.

The firm became James Bedford & Company.

See Double current ventilators

Hill & Norris
Halifax legal firm [1934]

Hill End Farm, Norwood Green

Hill House Clough, Mytholmroyd

Hill House, Halifax
Haley Hill. Stood next to the mills of James Akroyd & Son.

Owners and tenants have included

Hill House, Mytholmroyd
Raw Lane. Early 17th-century farm-house. The porch is dated 1698

Hill House, Stansfield

Owners and tenants have included

Hill House, Wadsworth
Owners and tenants have included

Hill Park Estate
Builders and contractors at Kebroyd Hall and Delph Hill Farm, Soyland.

Partners included W. Gledhill and W. Parker.

The partnership was dissolved in 1929

Hill Top, Elland
House. In the 1820s, it became known as North House, Elland

Hill Top Farm, Barkisland
Steel Lane. Thomas Horton left a part of the farm to the Minister of Ripponden

Hill Top Farm, Cragg Vale
Home of David Greenwood, one of the Cragg Vale Coiners

Hill Top, Shelf
Aka Pepper Hill Hall.

Owners and tenants have included

  • Joseph Johnson [1881]

The Hill, Warley
House aka Fern Hill, Warley

Hillam, Peter
[18??-18??] A publican in Elland.

Recorded in July 1859, when Charles Nutter and his wife Ann were charged with stealing 2 iron pans from Hillam

Hillard, John Wesley
[1859-19??] Originally from Somerset. He worked in the grocery trade in London, France and Ireland before opening shops in Cleckheaton. His Brighouse shop opened in Briggate in 1905.

The business evolved into Hillard's Supermarket

Hillard's Supermarket, Brighouse
Business established by John Wesley Hillard. The business occupied the building which was built on the site of the Astoria and subsequently occupied by Hillard's, Tesco's, and currently Wilkinson's

Hillary, Rev H. E. B.
[19??-19??] He served at Cheltenham before becoming Minister at Lightcliffe Congregational Church [1957]

Hilliard, Rev W. J.
[19??-19??] Minister at Elim Pentecostal Church, Halifax [1966]

Hillman, George Brown
[1867-1932] Born in Halifax. In 1931, he became Conservative MP for Wakefield. He died the following year

Hillman, Rev Samuel David
[1???-1???] He trained at New College, London and served at Cray in Kent before becoming Minister at Luddendenfoot Congregational Church [October 1863]. In December 1870, he moved to Ilkley. He wrote several devotional works

Hillside, Brighouse
House on Church Lane.

It was known as Mayfield [1889]

Hillside, Todmorden
Harley Wood. The house was built in 1??? It was distinguished by its turrets

Hilltop, Hipperholme
Owners and tenants have included

Hilltop House, Halifax
Aka Top o' th' Hill, House. Located at the end of what is now Lord Street at Town End. The house was bought by William Hopwood when he moved to Halifax about 1706. Around 1730, he demolished the house to build Hopwood Hall

Hillway House, Northowram
Tetley Lane. Mid-17th century house

Hilly Holly Brow, Northowram
Kell Lane. A plantation of oak, ash, sycamore, &c created about 1900.

The plantation (3 acres) was listed as a part of the Shibden Estate in a sale catalogue of October 1925

Hillyard, Rev James
[1814-1873] Born in Ipswich. He was a Baptist minister at Shifnall, Shropshire, and an Independent minister at Thorne, Sheffield before becoming Minister at Providence Congregational Church, Elland [1857].

He married Susannah [b 1813] of Yarmouth.

Children: (1) Mary [b 1846]; (2) William [b b 1847]; (3) Priscilla [b 1849].

The family lived at Castle Gate, Elland [1861].

In September 1863, he moved to Market Deeping and then to Billesdon. He died in Leicester

Hilton & Son
Jewellers at Silver Street, Halifax [1850]

Hilton, James
[18??-19??] Player with Halifax RLFC [1908]. He won caps for England while at Halifax

Hilton, Sir John
[14??-15??] Priest at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby [1554]

Hilton, John
[17??-18??] Watchmaker and clockmaker at 3 & 4 Chapel town, Halifax [1822, 1829], Swine Market, Halifax [1829, 1834], and 22 Cow Green, Halifax [1837]

Hilton's: John Hilton & Company
Wholesale clothiers at Hebden Bridge [1905]. They were at Salem Mills, Hebden Bridge [1917]

Hilton, Joseph
[1792-1838] A shopkeeper of Senior Fold, Halifax.

He was a socialist; an atheist.

On 28th December 1838, he died from poisoning by Prussic Acid Halifax Infirmary & Dispensary.

The Inquest heard

The deceased was not a patient at the Halifax Infirmary & Dispensary, but had called, as was usual for him, to see Mr James Bancroft, the Porter to the Infirmary. When having been left alone for a few minutes, he took the opportunity of trying the effect of the deadly draft and died almost immediately

A verdict of Temporary Derangement was returned

Hilton, Mr
[1???-18??] Silversmith at Bull Green, Halifax [1841].

On the evening of Tuesday, 26th October 1841, whilst Hilton and family were taking tea, gold and silver valued at £5 16/- was stolen from the shop. A man and a boy, named as Townsend, had been behaving suspiciously in the shop, and had offered a musical box for sale, and asked for change for half-a-crown

Hilton, Walter M.
[18??-19??] Halifax photographer. He was at 10a Corn Market, Halifax.

In January 1894, he was declared bankrupt.

He was at 21 Bull Green, Halifax [1905]

Hinchcliffe
A variant of the surname Hinchliffe.

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently only around 8 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hinchcliffe. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Hinchcliffe, Arthur
[1880-1963] Son of Sydney Taylor Hinchcliffe.

Born in Barkisland.

He was pianoforte tuner [1901]; a teacher of music and teacher of singing in Halifax; Professor of Singing [1911].

His pupils included Horace Sykes and Walter Widdop.

In 1907, he married Dorothy Rixson from London, in Eccleshall Bierlow.

The family lived at 222 Savile Park Road, Halifax [1936], (possibly) 18 Stafford Parade, Halifax [1903], 35 Rhodes Street, Halifax [1911], and Montana, Savile Park Road [1936]

Hinchcliffe, Rev Jonas
[1765-1833] A native of Holmfirth.

He trained at Northowram before becoming Minister at Booth Congregational Church [1794].

In 1801, he

left a divided congregation

and went to Haslingden. He moved to Allerton Chapel. He later joined the General Baptists at Horton.

He married Ann [1775-1858].

Children: (1) child who died in infancy; (2) child who died in infancy; (3) child who died in infancy; (4) child who died in infancy; (5) child who died in infancy; (6) child who died in infancy; (7) child who died in infancy; (8) Harriot [1797-1799]; (9) Manoah [1801] who died in his first year.

Members of the family were buried at Booth Independent Church

Hinchcliffe, Joseph
[16??-1674] Heywood records that Hinchcliffe hanged himself after being accused of being a witch

Hinchcliffe, Sarah
[17??-18??] of Barnsley.

She married John Carr

Hinchcliffe, Sydney Taylor
[1837-1916] Born in Stainland.

He was a worsted spinner and a woollen spinner [1901].

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Maria [b 1863]; (2) Kate [b 1870]; (3) Arthur.

The family lived at Wood Side, Barkisland [1901]. In 1911, he was retired and living with his son in Halifax

Hinchcliffe, Thomas
[18??-19??] He was a Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant with the Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer Wars.

He was awarded the Queen's South Africa medal

Hinchcliffe, Thomas
[1820-1880] Aka Tom. Son of William Hinchcliffe. Born in Stainland.

His father and 5 of his brothers were good musicians. He became a well-known vocalist. He played the clarionette.

On 20th July 1843, he married Emela Holroyd from Rastrick.

Children: (1) a daughter [d 1856]; (2) a daughter [d 1856].

In 1848, he was appointed bass-singer at Leeds Parish Church, and was known as the Great Yorkshire Basso. He was invited to sing before Queen Victoria in London.

In 1856, after the death of his daughters, he left Leeds and became Bandmaster of the 4th West York Militia at Hull.

Around 1862, he was Bandmaster of Stainland Brass Band.

He was landlord of

In July 1878, he had an attack of paralysis at Walsden Railway Station from which he never fully recovered. He moved from Gauxholme to Walsden and then to Dombey Street, Halifax, where he died.

He was buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 1853]

Hinchcliffe, William
[1???-1???] A tailor at Stainland. He was a musician.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Thomas; (2) son; (3) son; (4) son; (5) son; (6) son.

All his sons had musical abilities

Hinchliff
A variant of the surname Hinchliffe

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Hinchliffe
Other forms of the surname include Henchcliff, Hinchcliffe, Hinchliff, Hinchsliff, Inchcliffe and Inchliffe.

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

John de Hengeclif is recorded in 1324, and John Hinchliffe is recorded in 1633.

The name is said to originate in the Holmfirth area.

There are currently around 30 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Hinchliffe. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Hinchliffe family of Cragg Vale
A mill-owning family at Cragg Vale. Many of the families mills in the area – including Rudclough Mill, Vale Mill, Cragg Vale, Church Bank Mill, Cragg Vale, and Victoria Mills, Cragg Vale - had a bad reputation for exploiting child labour. At the beginning of the 19th century, children in their mills were recorded as working from 5:30 am to 8:30 pm.

Many of the family were buried at the church of Saint John in the Wilderness.

See G. & W. Hinchliffe, Marsh Grove, Cragg Vale, The Greenwood family of Cragg Vale and Jack Uttley

Hinchliffe, Albert
[1853-1941] Son of Thomas Edwin Hinchliffe.

Born in Halifax.

He was a cotton mill manager [1874]; a yarn agent & broker [1881]; a mill furnisher (employer) [1891]; a commission agent, mill furnisher and machinery broker at Eaves Mill, Hebden Bridge; a machinery broker [1901]; a mill furnisher [1911].

In 1874, he married Mary Hannah Foster [1854-1???] at Holy Trinity Church, Halifax.


Mary Hannah was the daughter of James Foster, pattern-maker
 

Children: (1) Frederick [b 1876] who was a mill furnisher's assistant [1891]; (2) Annie [b 1878] who was a sick nurse [1911]; (3) Albert [b 1880]; (4) Sarah [b 1883]; (5) Mary [b 1887] who was a dressmaker's apprentice [1901]; (6) Richard [b 1888] who was a law clerk [1911]; (7) Helen [b 1890]; (8) George; (9) Fanny [1893-1910].

The family lived at Bank Terrace, Hebden Bridge [1881]; 7 Cliff Street, Hebden Bridge [1891]; 27 Heath Cottage, Hebden Bridge [1901]; Eaves Cottage, Hebden Bridge [1905]; 12 Belvoir Gardens, Halifax [1911]; 12 Belvoir Gardens, Saint Alban's Road, Halifax [1915]

Fanny was buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

Hinchliffe, Alfred
[1???-1???] Lodging house keeper at the Barrack Tavern Lodge, Halifax.

In July 1884, he was summoned for harbouring known thieves, and also for allowing the sexes to sleep together indiscriminately in his house. For the 1st charge, he was fined £10 plus 7/6d costs, and for the 2nd charge, he was fined £1 plus 7/6d costs

Hinchliffe & Ashworth
Cotton warp agents at Hipperholme.

Partners included T. Hinchliffe and F. Ashworth.

The partnership was dissolved in September 1867

Hinchliffe & Wood
Yarn agents at India Buildings, Halifax [1874]

Hinchliffe, Charles
[18??-1???] Brighouse solicitor. Partner in Roberts, Son & Hinchliffe

Hinchliffe, Charles Edward
[1847-1886] Son of Hinchliffe Hinchliffe.

He died of consumption in Mentone, France [7th January 1886] (aged 39).

He was buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale [14th January 1886].

Probate records show that he left a personal estate valued at £5,418 16/4d. Probate was granted to his father

Hinchliffe, Edwin Rigby
[1???-19??] OBE.

He was a member of Brighouse Borough Council [1936]; an Alderman [1945]; Mayor of Brighouse [1954-1956]; He was made a Freeman of the Borough of Brighouse on 4th April 1964

Hinchliffe, Ernest William
[18??-19??] Halifax solicitor at Tower Chambers, Halifax [1934].

He qualified in June 1901

Hinchliffe, Frederic William
[1848-1880] Son of Hinchliffe Hinchliffe.

He never married.

He died of consumption in Melbourne, Australia [2nd March 1880].

He was buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale [12th June 1880].

Probate records show that he left a personal estate valued at under £4,000. Probate was granted to his father

Hinchliffe's: G. & I. Hinchliffe
Members of the Hinchliffe family of Cragg Vale, Cotton spinners at Cragg Mill, Cragg Vale [1821-1850].

The Hinchliffe's were mentioned in Crabtree's Tour of Calder Dale of 1832 in connection with the Ten Hours Bill. Crabtree interviewed a bricklayer who worked at their mill and said

they worked from 6 to 8 and in'd all lost time; they had only ¾ of an hour for dinner, and he could frequently hear the children scream, though he was out of doors when they were beating them

Mrs Sutcliffe, a widow whose 2 children worked at the mill said

they worked from 5:30 to 8:30, and had no times for meals when they were inning up any lost time which the machinery had occasion by breaking, or any other mishaps, and nothing allowed for it; and all the time the mill was repairing, they had no wages; and if they were 2 minutes late, they were fined 1d; if an hour late, 6d, and strapped into the bargain.

They pay in the truck system.

The masters walk through the works on Sundays and examine the work individually, and if they see the slightest fault, they mark the frame or loom with chalk, which is to be fined

Hinchliffe, George
[17??-1854] His cotton mill at Mill Bank was known as the Old Water Mill.

See Damside Mill, Ripponden

Hinchliffe, George
[1782-1856] Of Cragg.

Son of Joseph Hinchliffe.

Born in Sowerby.

He was a manufacturer [1841]; a cotton spinner employing 25 men, 32 women, 11 boys & 11 girls [1851].

On 24th June 1804, he married (1) Susy Susannah Barker [1784-1833] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Mary [1806-1832]; (2) Hannah [1807-1882]; (3) Fanny [1810-1883] who married George; (4) George; (5) Sarah [1814-1816]; (6) Frances Ann [1816-1817]; (7) Alfred [1818-1885]; (8) Joseph; (9) Susannah [1822-1835].

On 4th June 1840, he married (2) Susey Clegg [1770-1844] at Halifax Parish Church.

The family lived at Bottoms, Erringden [1841]; Mount Pleasant, Erringden [1851].

Living with them in 1841 was John Hinchliffe.

Living with them in 1851 was John Jackson.

He died 21st June 1856 [aged 73].

Members of the family were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

Hinchliffe, George
[18??-191?] He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on All Saints' War Memorial, Dudwell

Hinchliffe, George
[1811-1887] Son of Joseph Hinchliffe.

Born in Erringden.

He was a cotton spinner & manufacturer [1841]; a cotton spinner & fustian manufacturer [1851]; a cotton spinner [1859]; a cotton spinner employing 300 persons [1861]; a cotton spinner employing 150 hands [1871]; a retired cotton spinner [1881].

On 16th February 1832, he married his cousin Fanny Hinchliffe at Halifax Parish Church.


Fanny was the daughter of George Hinchliffe
 

Children: (1) Amanda [1832-1913]; (2) Grace [1834-1868]; (3) Hannah [b 1836]; (4) Susanna [1843-1859]; (5) Marianna [1846-1892/7] who married John Howorth Ormerod.

The family lived at 3 Stoodley Bridge [1841, 1851, 1861]; Stoodley Lodge [1871, 1881, 1887].

Robert Tatham was his coachman & gardener.

He died at Stoodley Lodge [22nd April 1887].

Members of the family were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale.

Probate records show that he left a personal estate valued at £55,817 19/7d. His will was proved by his brother Hinchliffe Hinchliffe and his daughters Amanda and Marianna

Hinchliffe, George
[1812-1872] Son of George Hinchliffe.

He was a cotton spinner [1841, 1851]; a retired cotton spinner [1861, 1871].

On 21st January 1836, he married Grace, daughter of Joseph Hinchliffe, at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Mary Hannah [1838-1911]; (2) Albert [1844-1871]; (3) Ida Victoria [1854-1859].

The family lived at Oldham [1841]; Woodville, Erringden [1851]; Longsight, Manchester [1861, 1871].

George died in Longsight, Manchester [24th April 1872].

Grace died at Lytham, Lancashire [11th January 1911].

Members of the family were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale: George [29th April 1872]; Grace [16th January 1903].

Mary Hannah Farrar [1818-1903], sister of Grace Hinchliffe, is buried in the same grave

Hinchliffe, George
[1891-1915] Son of Albert Hinchliffe

He was a commercial traveller [1911].

During World War I, he served as a Corporal with A Company 6th Battalion of the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.

He was killed at the Front [22nd September 1915] (aged 24).

He was buried at Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium [III A 38]

Hinchliffe's: George & William Hinchliffe
Members of the Hinchliffe family of Cragg Vale, Cotton spinners at Hole Bottom Mill, Stansfield from 1834. In 1861, they were at Lower Mill, Cragg, Scar Bottom Mill, Erringden, and Stoodley Bridge, Todmorden

Hinchliffe, George Eastwood
[1???-1959] Halifax architect. In his will, valued at £65,071, he left bequests for Saint John in the Wilderness, Cragg Vale and Saint Jude's Church, Savile Park,

Hinchliffe, Helen
[1853-1917] Daughter of Hinchliffe Hinchliffe.

After her father's cruel reputation in the district, she redeemed the family name in Cragg Vale. She built the vicarage for Saint John's Church.

She married 3 times.

On 9th April 1881, she married (1) George Sagar secretly at Burnley and against her father's wishes

In 1884, she married (2) Dr Edmund Strickland at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale.

In 1900, she inherited her father's estate of £325,000 – less death duties – but only left £76,000 to her husband when she died.

In 1902, she married (3) William Algernon Simpson at Knaresborough. He added her surname to his own, becoming Helen and William Algernon Simpson-Hinchliffe. She was 49, he 22.

A local cynic commented that:

she was stricken with nymphomania and bought the treatment

The couple built Cragg Hall.

In February 1912, she bought the Cragg Vale Inn from Stocks and renamed it the Hinchliffe Arms.

She died in London on 19th April 1917.

She was buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

See Cragg Vale Vicarage

Hinchliffe, Hinchliffe
[1822-1900] JP.

Son of Joseph Hinchliffe.

Born in Erringden.

He was a cotton spinner [1859, 1861]; owner of 4 cotton mills at Cragg Vale; partner in Hinchliffe Hinchliffe & Sons Limited; a JP for the Todmorden Union [1896].

On 9th June 1846, he married Fanny Greenwood [1826-1888] at Halifax Parish Church.


Fanny was the daughter of John Greenwood
 

Children: (1) Charles Edward – died of consumption; (2) Frederic William – died of consumption; (3) Howard Greenwood [1851-1855]; (4) Helen – the only child to survive; (5) Clara [1857-1878] who died of consumption.

He was known for being careful with money.

He bought Old Cragg Hall from Christopher Rawson.

The family supported Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale. Mrs Hinchliffe gave a lectern. Mr Hinchliffe gave the organ costing £400 in memory of his 2 sons. He and his daughter, Helen, gave a chancel window in memory of Mrs Hinchliffe.

Fanny died 2nd October 1888.

In his latter years, Hinchliffe moved to Southport where he lived almost as a recluse.

Hinchliffe died at Southport after a lingering illness [9th October 1900 in his 78th year].

After his death, his considerable estate passed to his daughter, Helen.

Members of the family were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale in the family vault there. Fanny's sister Mary Greenwood [1804-1878] is buried in the same grave.

See Cragg Vale Vicarage, Hinchliffe Arms and George Bentley Taylor

Hinchliffe Hinchliffe & Sons Limited
Cotton spinners at Victoria Mill, Cragg Vale and Church Bank Mill, Cragg Vale [1905]

Hinchliffe, Joseph
[1752-1817] On 16th January 1774, he married Mary Sutcliffe [1754-1833] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Samuel [1773-1840]; (2) George; (3) Joseph

Hinchliffe, Joseph
[1784-1859] Son of Joseph Hinchliffe.

Of Marsh Grove, Erringden.

He was a cotton spinner [1841]; a cotton spinner employing 19 men, 12 women, 21 girls & 9 boys [1851].

On 17th April 1808, he married (1) Grace Sutcliffe [1785-1820] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) William [1808-1849]; (2) George; (3) Richard [1813-1832]; (4) Mary Hannah [b 1816] who married Mr Farrar; (5) Grace [1818-1903] who married George Hinchliffe

On 14th December 1822, he married (2) Betty Kenworthy [1786-1824] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (6) Hinchliffe.

The family lived at Marshaw Grove, Cragg [1841]; Marsh Grove, Cragg [1851, 1859].

He died at Marsh Grove [28th July 1859].

Members of the family were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

Probate records show that he left effects valued at under £4,000.

His will was proved by his sons George and Hinchliffe

Hinchliffe, Joseph
[1808-19??] He was (possibly) landlord of the Robin Hood, Cragg Vale [1845, 1861].

He married Hannah [1811-1???].

Children: (1) Elizabeth [b 1831]; (2) Mary [b 1833]; (3) Edwin [b 1838]; (4) son A [b 1840].

The family lived at

See William Hinchliffe

Hinchliffe, Joseph
[1820-1864] Born in Sowerby.

He was a master cotton spinner employing 66 hands [1851]; a cotton spinner employing 262 workpeople [1861].

On 28th July 1842, he married Mary Ann Crabtree [1818-1893] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Ada [1844-1927] who was born in the USA and married Arthur Wilson; (2) George Clement [1845-1846]; (3) Orlando; (4) Wilhelmina [1848-1854]; (5) Teresa [1850-1928]; (6) Annette [1852-1870].

The family lived at Dam Side Cottages, Soyland [1851]; 1 Dam Side, Soyland [1861, 1871].

He died at Dam Side [23rd January 1864].

Probate records show that he left effects valued at under £7,000. Probate was granted to the executors: John Jackson of Wheatley (cotton spinner)  and Henry Mitchell of Elland (cardmaker).

In 1871, his widow Mary Ann was a cotton spinner employing 90 persons.

Members of the family were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

Hinchliffe, Oliver
[1841-1908] Brighouse cabinet-maker. He had premises at Bradford Road. The shop is now occupied by Brooke's Restaurant

Hinchliffe, Orlando
[1847-1882] Son of Joseph Hinchliffe.

He was a master cotton spinner [1871].

He owned Gates End Mill, Cragg Vale.

In 1868, he married Elizabeth, daughter of John Bradley in Manchester.

Children: Wilhelmina [1870-1873].

In 1871, the family were living with Elizabeth's father John Bradley, at Slitheroe House, Rishworth.

He died in Southport [aged 35].

Members of the family were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

Hinchliffe, Priestley Napier
[1854-1???] Son of James Hinchliffe.

Born in Low Moor.

He was a servant at the Duchess of Kent public house, Sackville Street, Bradford [1891]; overlooker of worsted spinners [1891]; beerhouse keeper at the Bradford Arms, Halifax [1901]; landlord of the Bradford Hotel, Halifax [1905, 1911].

In 1891, he married Ann Morley [1854-1909] at Bradford Cathedral.


Ann was from Ireland, the daughter of factor John Morley
 

Children: (1) Annie Lee [b 1893] who was a mill hand [1911]; (2) Charlie Napier [b 1896] who was a mechanic [1911].

Living with them in 1901 was Jane Morley [aged 16] (illegitimate?) (worsted spinner).

Living with them in 1911 were visitor Alice Duffy [aged 17] (mill hand) and 33 lodgers

Hinchliffe's: R. & H. Hinchliffe
Members of the Hinchliffe family of Cragg Vale, Cotton spinners at Cragg Vale [1874]

Hinchliffe, Richard
[1752-1817] Of Clough Moor in Erringden.

He was in partnership with his son-in-law John Greenwood at Paper Mill, Cragg Vale.

He married Mary [1754-1833]

Children: (possibly) Hannah [1780-1852] who married John Greenwood.

He died 21st May 1817 [aged 65].

Mary died 11th October 1833 [aged 79].

Members of the family were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

Hinchliffe, Richard
[1803-1862] Son of Samuel Hinchliffe.

He was beer seller at Plod Well Wood Bottom, Cragg Vale [1841]; (possibly) landlord of the Cragg Vale Inn, Erringden [1851]; (possibly) landlord of the Royal Oak, Mytholmroyd [1862?]; a cotton twist maker [1861].

On 1st January 1823, he married Maria Sutcliffe [1802-1881] at Halifax Parish Church.


Maria was born in Wadsworth
 

Children: (1) Sarah Ann [1823-1888] who married Joseph Hartley; (2) William 1826-1861; (3) Thomas Edwin.

The family lived at Plod Well Wood Bottom, Cragg Vale [1841]; Marshaw Bridge, Cragg Vale [1851]; Wheatley, Boy Lane [1861].

Richard died in Wheatley [8th February 1862] (aged 59).

Probate records show that he left effects valued at under £20. Probate was granted to his widow Maria. The probate record notes that he was

late of the Royal Oak Inn, Mytholmroyd

Maria died 4th December 1881 [aged 70].

Members of the family were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

Hinchliffe, Samuel
[1773-1840] He married Elizabeth / Betty [1775-1834].

Children: (1) Richard [1803-1840]; (2) William; (3) Joseph [1808-1872]; (4) Elizabeth [1816-1875] who married Joseph Booth; (5) Fanny [1819-1868] who died at Silver Street, Halifax [1868].

Elizabeth died 25th November 1834 [aged 59].

Samuel died 28th April 1840 [aged 67].

The couple were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

Hinchliffe, Thomas Edwin
[1829-1906] Son of Richard Hinchliffe.

Born in Sowerby.

He was a cotton twister [1851]; a mill manager [1861]; a yarn merchant [1871]; a manufacturer [1874]; a cotton spinner & doubler employing 70 hands [1881]; a cotton spinner [1891, 1901].

He owned Gates End Mill, Cragg Vale.

He was listed at Church Bank Mill, Cragg Vale [1893].

He also managed Victoria Mills, Cragg Vale, Vale Mill, Cragg Vale, and Upper Mill, Cragg Vale for Hinchliffe Hinchliffe, to whom he had to report by 8:30 am in the latter's bedroom.

On 13th May 1852, he married (1) Sarah Bentley [1831-1881] at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale.


Sarah was born in Erringden, the daughter of George Bentley.

She died 11th August 1881 [aged 50]

 

Children: (1) Albert; (2) Frederick [1861-1937] who was a cotton twister [1881]; (3) Richard [1864-1918] who was a bookkeeper [1881]; (4) Annie [1866-1868].

On 26th October 1881, he married (2) Elizabeth [1836-1914] at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale.


Elizabeth was the daughter of Mr Higgin, and widow of Mr Gaukroger
 

The family lived at Castle Hill, Cragg [1861]; 25 Savile Park, Halifax [1871]; Old Cragg Hall [1881, 1891, 1901].

Thomas Edwin died 27th December 1906 (aged 78).

Sarah & Thomas Edwin were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

Hinchliffe, William
[17??-18??] Cotton spinner at Rudclough Mill, Erringden [1822]

Hinchliffe, William
[1805-1834] Son of Samuel Hinchliffe.

He was a grocer [1841,1851]; a linen draper [1861].

On 9th June 1828, he married Susey Rushworth [1809-1878] at Halifax Parish Church.


Susey / Susan / Susannah was born in Sowerby
 

Children: (1) Betty [1829-1875] who married James Horsfall; (2) Mary Ellen [1832-1873]; (3) William; (4) Samuel [b 1834] who was a linen draper [1861].

The family lived at Woodlands Hall, Sowerby [1841,1851]; 26 Silver Street, Halifax [1861].

Living with them in 1861 was Mrs Mary Halliwell [aged 49] (retired beerseller) 


In 1841, 1851 & 1861, the widowed Susan was head of the household and a grocer [1841, 1851], a linen draper [1861].

In 1871, she was living as housekeeper for son William and his wife

 

Widow Susy and daughter Mary Ellen both died in Southport.

Members of the family were buried at Saint John's Church, Cragg Vale

Hinchliffe, William
[1833-1???] Son of William Hinchliffe.

Born in Cragg Vale.

He was a linen draper [1861, 1871].

In [Q1] 1870, he married Ann [1800-1???] in Halifax.


Ann was Ann née Fossard, widow of George Shields, and had 2 children (1) Henrietta [b 1856]; (2) Joe [b 1858]
 

The family lived at 27 Crown Street, Halifax [1871].

Living with them in 1871, was William's mother Susannah, and several milliners, draper's assistants and apprentices

Hinchsliff
A variant of the surname Hinchliffe

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Hind, Albert Ernest
[18??-19??] He established Albert Hind Limited at North Parade, Halifax.. He published a monthly
Albert Hind's Household Journal

The family lived at 27 Clover Hill Villas, Halifax [1905]

Hind's: Albert Hind Limited
Importer, dealer and tuners of pianos and organs founded in 1879 by Albert Ernest Hind. The business was originally at North Parade, Halifax. Around 1884, they expanded and moved to premises at the corner of Crossley Street and Waterhouse Street, Halifax.

The company had a branch at Batley.

They evolved into radio and television dealers

Closed in 19??.

See Hind's Chambers, Halifax

Hind's Chambers, Halifax
18 Crossley Street. Office premises in the building occupied by Albert Hind Limited.

Owners and tenants have included

Hind, Ellis
[11834-19?] Son of Richard Hind of Queensbury.

Born at Queensbury [2nd October 1834].

He was educated at Queensbury Baptist School; Chairman of Shelf UDC; Justice of the Peace for the West Riding; President of Shelf Liberal Club.

Established Ellis Hind & Company.

He married Emma Briggs.


Emma was the daughter of Samuel Briggs of Queensbury
 

The family lived at Wade House, Shelf [1902]

Hind's: Ellis Hind & Company
Worsted, mohair & alpaca spinners at Shelf Mills [1902] Established by Ellis Hind

Hind, Rev John
[18??-18??] Curate at Greetland [1853]. At this time, services were held at Houghcroft Head, Greetland

Hinde, Rev Henry Derwent
[18??-19??] Vicar of Clifton [1913-1920]

Hindle, Elizabeth
[1827-1920] Born in Cliviger.

A local character known as Betty o' th' Fly, of Fly Flatts, who appears in Whiteley Turner's book A Spring-Time Saunter.

She married (1) John Sutcliffe.

Children: Betsy.

In 1868, John died and Elizabeth moved to Ovenden, where she worked as a washerwoman.

In 1871, she married (2) Samson Sunderland.

The family lived at Far New Fly Farm, Wainstalls

Hindle, Irvine
[1882-1940] He was a jeweller with Charles Horner. He established business as a goldsmith & jeweller in Southgate, Halifax.

In 1908, he married Mabel Letitia Richardson [1884-1930] in Halifax.

Children: (1) Rodney [1909-1963]; (2) Doreen [1912-1989]; (3) Donald [1917-1980] who carried on the family business.

The family lived at Southgate Balcony; Brockholes Farm, Ogden; Rosemont, Bradshaw

Hindle's: Irvine Hindle
Goldsmith & jeweller established around 1906 by Irvine Hindle. The business was at 25 Southgate, Halifax [1936].

His son Donald who carried on the business

The business closed in 1995

Hindle, Rev John
[17??-18??] He came from Honley, Staffordshire.

He was a pupil of Fawcett.

He became Minister at Pellon Lane Particular Baptist Church [1779]. He was a popular preacher, but

unhappily being of an irritable disposition, a trifling matter discomposed him

He left in 1789.

He was one of the first Ministers at Elland Particular Baptist Church.

In 1791, James Cartledge offered him a higher salary to move to his new Blackley Baptist Church. He preached his last service at Elland in September 1792. Shortly afterwards, the Elland Church closed because most of the congregation followed him to Blackley.

During his time at Blackley, the congregation was much reduced, and Cartledge died. He left in 1793 owing to

his irascible temper

The Church was then without a pastor for 3 years

Hindley, Richard
[16??-17??] A dyer in Skircoat.

He lived at Washer Lane House, Halifax [1685].

On his death, he left the House to his daughter, the wife of John Wainhouse

Hindmarch, Rev Alan M.
[19??-20??] Minister at Bethesda Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Elland [1974]

Hines, Charles
[18??-18??] On 24th May 1858, he was brought up by Detective Tempest and charged at Halifax Borough Court with deserting from the 6th Regiment 1st Battalion of Foot. Tempest had heard that Hines was staying with his parents at Caddy Field, and went to find him around midnight. Hines's mother told the police that her son was not at home, and expressed surprise to hear that he had deserted his regiment. They searched the house and found a bed which had been recently occupied. They then searched a wooden box upon which Mrs Hines had been sitting during the search, and found
the ghastly form of the missing man, minus any covering but his night-shirt

The Bench committed Hines to the House of Correction at Wakefield

Hines, E.
[18??-191?] Of Southowram.

He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on Southowram War Memorial

Hines, Mrs
[1758-18??] Of Halifax.

In January 1858, at the age of 100, she was taken to Wakefield Sessions to give evidence in a settlement case. She was healthy, but her mental facilities were dull and her evidence was of no value. Her daughter took her back to Halifax

Hines, Rev
[1???-1???] Minister at Northgate End Chapel, Halifax [1947]

Hinkley, Rev Thomas
[18??-19??] MA.

He was vicar at Leeds before becoming Vicar of Sowerby [1895, 1897]

Hions, Emma
[1921-2003] MBE.

She was a member of Brighouse Town Council [1958]. She was the second – and last – lady Mayor of Brighouse [1970-1971] and she was Deputy Mayor for Mona Mitchell.

With Calderdale Council, she represented Rastrick for 8 years from 1974, and Brighouse from 1982. Hions Close, Rastrick is named for her.

She received the MBE in January 2002.

She had been the longest-serving Councillor when she retired in May 2002

Hippens Farm, Blackshawhead
Aka Hippins. Built in 1650. Stands at the head of Jumble Hole Clough

Hipperholm
Area of Todmorden

Hipperholme
District of Calderdale to the east of Halifax, and on the road to Leeds.

See Population, Parish statistics and Manor of Wakefield

Hipperholme & Lightcliffe Bowling Club
Amisfield Road. Recorded in 1917

Hipperholme & Lightcliffe Conservative Club
Wakefield Road.

On 7th October 1922, the new Club opened at Tennyson Bungalow, Victoria Road, Lightlciffe.

This was the first local political club to admit both sexes

In 1924, they moved to Elm Royd, Wakefield Road, Lightcliffe

Hipperholme & Lightcliffe Liberal Club
Built in 1886.

The club disbanded in 1914, and part of the building was used as a school run by Misses Field and Price.

During World War II, there was British restaurant here.

In 1948, it was used as a school canteen.

It was known locally as The High School.

In 1955, the building became Lightcliffe Preparatory School.

See Lightcliffe Liberal Club

Hipperholme & Lightcliffe Ward, Halifax
One of the Electoral Wards of Halifax

Hipperholme Building Society
Established in 1863

Hipperholme Churchwardens
The Foldout lists some of the people who have been churchwardens at Hipperholme.

See Churchwarden

Hipperholme Co-Op
Branch number 22 of the Halifax Industrial Society opened in March 1873

Hipperholme Common Wood
33 acres. A part of the Brianscholes Forest

Hipperholme constables
The Foldout lists some of the Constables for the township of Hipperholme cum Brighouse

Hipperholme Co-operative Stores
Leeds Road. Greengrocery, Chemists and Footwear shops for the Brighouse District Industrial Society opened at Hipperholme in 1???.

The Grocery needs of the village were served by the Halifax Industrial Society which opened in March 1873

Hipperholme crossroads
The busy 5-way junction of Keighley-Brighouse Denholme Gate Road A644, the Leeds-Halifax Whitehall Road A58, and the Wakefield-Halifax Wakefield Road A63.

A proposal to ease congestion of the junction was abandoned [April 2005] because of the cost. The development would have required the demolition of many houses and shops.

The Whitehall pub and Hipperholme Methodist Chapel dominate the junction

Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse
Eastern township in the parish of Halifax which comprised Coley, Norwood Green, Hipperholme, and the hamlet of Brighouse on the north bank of the Calder.

The boundaries were marked by Royds Hall Beck, Wyke Beck, Clifton Beck, Red Beck, Jum Hole Beck, and the Calder.

From the 17th century, the township was divided into 5 quarters: Hipperholme, Norwood Green, Lightcliffe, Hove Edge, and Brighouse.

Brighouse was originally smaller than Hipperholme, and finally separated from the rest when the Brighouse Local Board was established in 1865.

The name Hipperholme with Brighouse is found in 1881.

Hipperholme Urban District Council was established in 1894.

In 1937, Hipperholme Urban District Council amalgamated with Brighouse Corporation.

See Population, Brighouse Sewering, Drainage & Lighting Bill [1845], Parish statistics, Hipperholme Town Hall and PC Anthony Waddington

Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse & Rastrick Reformers' Association
A 19th century organisation which supported the Reform Bill

Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse Board of Guardians

See Board of Guardians and Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse Overseers of the Poor

Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse Horticultural Society
Established in the mid-19th century. They held their annual show at Crow Nest

Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse Overseers of the Poor
The Foldout lists some of the people who have served as Overseer of the Poor for Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse.

See Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse Board of Guardians

Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse Workhouse
In 1777, this accommodated 40 inmates.

Until 1834, this was at a house in Till Carr Lane.

See Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse

Hipperholme District Council
See Bailiff Bridge, Hipperholme Rural District Council, <