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Sacred Heart & Saint Bernard's Catholic Church, Halifax

Sacred Heart & Saint Patrick's Catholic Church, Sowerby Bridge
Bolton Brow.

On 26th October 1919, the foundation stone was laid for the new Church.

On 8th April 1934, the foundation stone was laid for a new Church on the site of Broadgates, Sowerby Bridge. This opened on 16th October 1934

 
Priests at the Church have included


 

Saint Aidan's Church Mission, Walsden
Originally Friths Old Mill.

The building was still in use as workshops [2008]

Saint Aidan's Mission Church, Bailiff Bridge
Bradford Road. Opened around 1884. The pulpit was carved by Harry Percy Jackson.

It was used as a carpet warehouse by T. F. Firth & Company.

Bailiff Bridge British School was here.

The building fell into disrepair.

The memorial remembering those who fell in World War I was moved to St Matthew's Church in 1980.

The building is currently [September 2008] available for redevelopment

Saint Aidan's Mission, Wainstalls
Kell Butts. Formerly Kell School. It is now a private house

Saint Alban's Catholic Church, Halifax
Abbey Walk South. Opened in November 1954. It was a daughter church for St Mary's Church, Gibbet Street.

 
Priests at the Church have included


 

Saint Andrew's Chapel of Ease, Brighouse
Opened 18??.

Closed 19??.

See Chapel of ease

Saint Andrew's Church, Brighouse
Formerly Thornhill Briggs School

Saint Andrew's Church, Stainland
This superseded St Bartholomew's Chapel which was built on the site in 1754.

See St Andrew's Church, Stainland: Graveyard, Stainland Cross and Stainland Vicarage

Saint Andrew's Methodist Chapel, Halifax
Queens Road.

Opened in 1877 when Hanson Lane Methodist New Connexion Church became full. It was a daughter church to Salem Methodist New Connexion Chapel, North Parade.

Joseph Mackintosh and family were members of the Chapel.

In the first part of the 20th century, they had a thriving and popular operatic society

Closed in October 1952.

The Church was demolished in the 1960s

Saint Andrew's Methodist Church, Huddersfield Road
Halifax. Built on the site of Stafford Square Wesleyan Church.

Opened 1965.

The congregations from 4 local Methodist churches – including St John's Methodist Church, Prescott Street - moved to here

Saint Andrew's Mission Church, Holmfield
Beechwood Road. Built in 1897.

John Taylor Ramsden contributed a large amount towards the cost.

 
Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP203): Baptisms [1897-1954], Banns [1967-1978] and Marriages [1967-1988].

See Holmfield Mission Church

Saint Andrew's, Stainland: Graveyard
The graveyard for St Andrew's Church, Stainland

Saint Anne's in the Grove Church, Southowram
Aka Briers Chapel, Chapel-le-Briers, Chapel-le-Grove, Lacey's Chapel, St Anne's in the Briers, and Southowram Parish Church.

See Wilson Marshall, Harold V. Richardson, Amos Robinson, St Anne's in the Grove Church, Southowram: Graveyard, St Anne's Sabbath School, Southowram, St Peter's Mission Church, Brookfoot and Southowram Vicarage

Saint Anne's in the Grove Church, Southowram: Font
The font from the old chapel at Southowram was taken to the new Church of 1816

It is said that Cromwell's soldiers sharpened their swords on the stone

Saint Anne's in the Grove, Southowram: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Anne's in the Grove Church, Southowram.

In the 1920s, the graveyard was full and was supported by voluntary subscriptions.

The graveyard was extended and consecrated by Dr Eden, Bishop of Wakefield, on 9th June 1928. After that date, burials in the 2 sections might be differentiated as old ground and new ground.

The Annexe to the graveyard is next to the National School

Saint Augustine's Church, Pellon
Hanson Lane, Halifax. The Church was built by public subscription in 1872-1875. The corner stone was laid on 3rd June 1873 at a ceremony conducted
with Masonic formalities

by Colonel Akroyd, Samuel Waterhouse and Bishop Ryan.

It accommodated 750 people.

A new west window was unveiled on 19th May 1912.

On 8th May 1927, memorial tablets were unveiled at the Church.

The church closed in 197?, when meetings were transferred to the nearby St Augustine's School.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

The Church runs St Augustine's Centre, offering a valuable service to the local community

There is a memorial to the murdered missionary, Miss Edith Nettleton in the Church.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP183): Baptisms [1872-1971], Banns [1876-1963] and Marriages [1876-1988].

See California and St Augustine's Vicarage, Pellon

Saint Augustine's Vicarage, Halifax
The vicarage of St Augustine's Church, Pellon was designed by C. F. L. Horsfall and with work by Richard Coad

Saint Barnabas's Church & Schools, Halifax
Recorded in 1905 at Lock Street, Caddy Field

Saint Barnabas's Church, Shore
Opened in 1901

Saint Barnabas's Mission Church, Halifax
Recorded in 1905 at Lock Street

Saint Bartholomew's Chapel, Stainland
Built by public subscription in 1754. It opened for worship in 1755.

This was the first church in Stainland.

In January 1758, a dissenters' meeting house was registered here.

It was multi-denominational, and was shared by Anglicans, Wesleyan Methodists and Congregationalists.

John Wesley preached at the church in 1759.

In 1812, there was a disagreement when the Anglicans tried to insist that only the orders of service from the Book of Common Prayer should be used, whereupon the Congregationalists decided to leave and built their own chapel, Providence Congregational Church.

The Methodists and the Anglicans remained and continued to share the chapel.

In 1838, it joined the Church of England.

It was demolished and replaced by St Andrew's Church, Stainland which was built on the same site

Saint Bartholomew's Church, Dean Head
West Scammonden. Aka Deanhead Chapel.

There has been a place of worship here since 1615.

There have been 3 churches on the present site.

The present church was built in 1865.

The altar rails were carved by Harry Percy Jackson.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP107): Baptisms [1746-1986], Banns [1866-1924], Marriages [1748-1986] and Burials [1746-1986].

See St Bartholomew's, Dean Head: Miscellaneous MIs and St Bartholomew's Church, Dean Head: Graveyard

Saint Bartholomew's Church, Ripponden
The Church stands alongside the Ryburn in the township of Barkisland.

See Chapel Farm, Ripponden, Chapel Field Mill, Ripponden, John Jagger, Ripponden Sunday School, Ripponden Vicarage, St Bartholomew's, Ripponden: Churchwardens, St Bartholomew's, Ripponden: MIs, The flood of 1722 and St Bartholomew's, Ripponden: Graveyard

Saint Bartholomew's, Dean Head: Graveyard
Scammonden. The graveyard of St Bartholomew's Church, Dean Head.

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Monumental Inscriptions in the Ripponden Area

Saint Bartholomew's, Ripponden: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Bartholomew's Church, Ripponden

Saint Bernadette's Catholic Church, Mixenden
Clough Lane. Built in 1958.

It closed in 1994. It was sold in 1998 and converted into private dwellings

Saint Bernard's Catholic Church, Halifax
Sunnyside / Range Lane, Boothtown.

Father Jerome Quinlan was assigned to oversee the building of the new Church of the Sacred Heart & St Bernard. It was designed by Edward Simpson 1895-1897.

The building was damaged by fire in 1909.

A fire in 1913, destroyed some altar scenes which were believed to have been painted by Albert Horsfall.

 
Priests at the Church have included


 

On 20th July 1913, a new sanctuary was opened and blessed by Cardinal Logue, Primate of All Ireland

See St Bernard's School, Halifax

Saint Chad's Chapel of Ease, Hove Edge
Opened 18??.

Closed 19??.

See Chapel of ease

Saint Chad's Church, Hove Edge
Halifax Road.

A congregation had been meeting in St Chad's School since 1895 as an offshoot of St Martin's in Brighouse.

Rev O. S. Laurie bought the land for £100.

The design was started by W. Hodgson Fowler of Newcastle, and completed by W. H. Wood after Fowler's death.

The foundation stone was laid on 15th July 1911 by Miss Byrne.

The Church was completed in 1912 at a cost of £2,000, and opened on 29th June 1912 to supersede St Chad's School.

This was a daughter church to Brighouse Parish Church.

Details of the organ in the Chapel can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

In 1968, the organ by Wood of Huddersfield was moved to St Martin's Church

St Chad's became a parish in its own right in 1988.

In 2005, the Church spent £39,000 on creating a meeting room at the back and improving the external surrounds.

In December 2009, it was announced that St Chad's was to share a vicar with Lightcliffe.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

Saint Chad's Church, Rochdale
The Church and the Graveyard lie outside Calderdale, but, they are/were used by many local people

Saint Chad's Church, Rochdale: Graveyard
St Chad's Church and the Graveyard lie outside Calderdale, but, they are/were used by many local

The following people, and/or members of their family, were buried and/or have memorials here:


  • To be completed
 

Saint Chad's Mission Church & School

Saint Columba's Roman Catholic Church, Pellon
Highroad Well Lane

Saint Columcille's Roman Catholic Church, Pellon
On 8th October 1933, the foundation stone was laid. On 4th August 1934, it opened for workship.

 
Priests at the Church have included


 

Saint Edward's Mission Church, Boothtown
Ploughcroft / Boothtown Road.

Opened in 18??

See Harry Willie Naylor

Saint George's Chapel of Rest
Now known as Mytholmroyd Farmhouse

Saint George's Church, Hanover Square, London
Many couples from Calderdale were married at the Church, including:

Rev Arthur Edmund John Burton Barrow
John William Berry
Sir Hylton Ralph Brisco

James Clay
Agnes Caroline Cowell
William Crowther

Captain John Dearden

Thomas Fielden
Robert John Foster

William Goodyear
Rev Percival Gough

Dr Alfred Mantle

Wallace Lea Norris

William Henry Peel
Jonathan Edward Priestley

Captain George Taylor Ramsden
Francis Rhodes

Robert Whitworth
Thomas Wilkinson

Saint George's Church, Lee Mount
Between St George's Road and Lilac Street.

The parish arose from the chapel at Ovenden Cross of 1863.

The Church was endowed by Jane, daughter of Rev Anthony Moss.

It was built by Benjamin Whitehead Jackson in 1868 [??].

It was consecrated on St George's Day, 1877.

Details of the organ in the Church can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

The vicarage was next to the Church to the north-west.

In the 1890s, it was proposed to build the Wheatley Valley Bridge from here to Beech Hill, Halifax.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

In the 1960s, it is shown as St George's, Ovenden with St Peter's, Wheatley.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP204): Baptisms [1877-1984], Banns [1904-1997], Marriages [1878-1975] and Burials [1878-1980].

See St George's Church, Lee Mount: Graveyard and St George's Sunday School, Lee Mount

Saint George's Church, Lee Mount: Graveyard
The graveyard for St George's Church, Lee Mount

Saint George's Church, Norwood Green
Aka Norwood Green Mission Church. The foundation stone was laid on 1st June 1907. The church was dedicated by the Bishop of Wakefield and opened on 15th February 1908.

The church closed on 3rd November 2002 and the congregation moved to St John's at Coley.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP38): Baptisms [1911-1989], Banns [1973-1990] and Marriages [1973-2002].

Saint George's Church, Sowerby
Haugh End Lane. Aka Quarry Hill Church. The project to build the church was supported by Rev W. H. Bull, G. B. Hadwen, Robert Stansfield – who gave the land, the Rawson family of Sowerby, and the Priestley family of White Windows – who gave the stone for the construction.

The Church was designed by Edward Walsh in a Norman style.

It was consecrated by the Bishop of Ripon on 27th October 1840.

Details of the organ in the Church can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

The parsonage and school room are attached to the Church.

In 1907, a stained glass window installed in memory of Rev Samuel Field Laycock. This has 3-lights representing Meekness, Gentleness and Goodness, which the memorial committee thought to be prominent qualities in his life. The window was designed by Messrs Kayll of Leeds. The cost of the window was £155.


Question: Does anyone know whether this is the existing east window at the church?

 

The Church was reconstructed in 1930/1931, and a chancel screen, altar and pulpit were carved by Harry Percy Jackson.

In 1970, the 1880 font was moved here from St John the Divine, Thorpe.

A list of some of the Vicars of Saint George's, Sowerby is given in a separate Foldout

The church closed on 1st December 1989. It was declared redundant and sold in 1992.

An altar and reredos remembering those who died in World War I, was brought from ??.

In 2003, the building was converted into private apartments.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP138): Baptisms [1840-1988], Banns [1892-1989], Marriages [1843-1989] and Burials [1842-1978].

See St George's School and St George's Church, Sowerby: Graveyard

Saint George's Mission Church, Ovenden
Nursery Lane.

Around 1853, Rev William Gillmor of Illingworth felt the need for a chapel at Ovenden Cross. At first, services were held in a barn, then a cottage, then a dissenting chapel. Around 1860, the Stocks family of Shibden gave land for a new chapel, This opened on 23rd November 1863. It accommodated 314 worshippers and was also used as a day school.

The parish of St George's Ovenden arose from this first chapel.

In 1877, when the new church opened, the Mission building was sold to the Catholic community

See St George's Church, Lee Mount

Saint George's, Sowerby: Graveyard
The graveyard for St George's Church, Sowerby

Saint Helen's Church, Holywell Green
Watson mentions a Roman Catholic chapel here.

St Elyn's Chapel, Stainland appears on a list of

Decayed Chapels for want of maintenance in the reign of Queen Elizabeth [the First]

The building was converted into a house. There was a stone in the wall which was known as The Cross.

See St Helen's Well, Holywell Green

Saint Hilda's Church, Barkisland
Opened in 18??

Saint Hilda's Church, Halifax
Gibraltar Road. Designed by Sutcliffe & Sutcliffe. On 14th August 1909, the first sod was cut on the site.

A. S. McCrea gave £300 for the building on 30th January 1911. The church was consecrated on 27th May 1911.

Details of the organ in the Church can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP201): Baptisms [1903-1962], Banns [1911-1990] and Marriages [1911-1990].

Saint Hilda's Mission Church, Halifax
Built in 1898 to serve the King Cross area of Halifax.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

Saint James & Saint Mary Church of England, Halifax
Opened in 18??.


Question: Does anyone know whether this is the amalgamation of St James Church, Halifax with St Mary's Church, Rhodes Street?

 

The organ by Gray was opened on 5th March 1837. Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP170): Baptisms [1953-1986], Banns [1952-1985] and Marriages [1957-1983].

Saint James's Church, Calderbook
The Church and the Graveyard lie outside Calderdale, but, they are/were used by many local people

Saint James's Church, Calderbrook: Graveyard
St James's Church and the Graveyard lie outside Calderdale, but, they are/were used by many local

The following people, and/or members of their family, were buried and/or have memorials here:


  • To be completed
 

Saint James's Church, Halifax
The Church started by Samuel Knight and completed by Charles Musgrave, who asked Anne Lister to sell a piece of land for the construction of a new church in the Cabbage Lane area of Halifax. The Church was consecrated on 22nd September 1831.

See St James & St Mary Church of England, Halifax, St James's Church Sunday School, Halifax, St James's Church, Halifax: Graveyard, Parish of St James, Halifax and St James's Infant School, Halifax

Saint James's, Halifax: Graveyard
The graveyard of St James's Church, Halifax.

When the Church and Burial Ground closed, the remains of 1587 people were transferred and reinterred at Stoney Royd Cemetery in a single vault – with brick walls and a concrete top – [1961]

Saint James, Halifax, Parish of
The parish for St James's Church, Halifax was formed in 1843

Saint James's Parish Church, Brighouse

Saint James's Parsonage, Halifax
North Parade. The Parsonage for St James's Church, Halifax stood immediately to the east.

In the 1960s, the building was used for some of the services provided by Halifax Corporation's Health Department - Baby Clinic, Mental Health Service, and Home Help Service – prior to the opening of The Laura Mitchell Clinic in October 1968.

Like the Church, the Parsonage has been demolished

Saint James the Great Church, Hebden Bridge
The church was designed by Pickersgill and Oates, and built under the Million Pound Act on land given by Rev J. A. Rhodes and his wife.

See St James the Great Church, Hebden Bridge: Graveyard, Sowden Chapel and Tin Mission, Mytholm

Saint James the Great, Hebden Bridge: Graveyard
The graveyard of St James the Great Church, Hebden Bridge

Saint James's United Methodist Free Church, Luddenden
High Street. Opened 7th March 1903. The building cost around £2000.

There is an organ by Conacher. Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

There is a roll of honour remembering those who served in World War I.

A roll of honour remembering those who served in World War I was brought here from Luddenden Dean Wesleyan Chapel.

A granite tablet remembering those who served in World War I was brought here from Luddenden Wesleyan Church.

 
Subsequent Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

In 19??, the building was occupied by Midgley & Luddenden Methodist Church.

It closed in 200?.

It is due to be converted into housing

Saint John's Chapel of Rest, Rastrick
When it closed in 19??, the St John's Ambulance Hall, Rastrick became a Chapel of Rest

Saint John's Church, Hebden Bridge
The foundation stone was laid on 26th June 1929. The church opened on 6th May 1931. Those who gave money for the building included Mary Sowden.

The church became redundant in 1984 and is now private dwellings.

The pulpit and reredos were carved by Harry Percy Jackson. They were removed when the church closed, and are now in America.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP67): Baptisms [1931-1981], Banns [1960-1982] and Marriages [1960-1980].

Saint John's Church, Ovenden
Built under the Million Pound Act. Designed by Charles Child.

Recorded in 1838 in the Alumni Cambrigienses (Part II 1752-1900) when Rev Edward Ramsden was appointed Perpetual Curate


Question: Does anyone know anything about the Church? Have I confused this with St John the Evangelist, Bradshaw?

 

Saint John's Church, Stubbing
Hebden Bridge.

On 13th April 1899, a Mission Room Licence is recorded authorising the performance of Divine Service in the St John's School Chapel Stubbings.

The Church was built in 1906. It accommodated a congregation of 350

Saint John's Congregational Church, Todmorden
Patmos. Recorded in 1868

Saint John's, Halifax
In early records, the name St John's usually refers to Halifax Parish Church, that is, St John the Baptist's Parish Church, Halifax

Saint John in the Wilderness, Cragg Vale
Aka Cragg Church, Marshaw Bridge Church.

The foundation for the Church was laid on 15th March 1813.

The Church was consecrated in 1817. It accommodated around 250 worshippers.

In 1838, White wrote that the chapel was ...

so indifferently built that its roof has once fallen in and is now supported by props

The present Church was built in 1839 at a cost of £2,130 part-funded by the Million Pound Act. Charles Child was involved in the construction.

The sandstone for the Church was quarried at Clattering Stones.

It accommodated around 800 worshippers.

The organ, by Wards of York [1821], was brought from Square Independent Chapel, Halifax. Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

The Brontë family often visited the Church.

Hinchliffe Hinchliffe and his family supported the Church. Mrs Hinchliffe gave a lectern. Mr Hinchliffe gave the organ costing £400 in memory of his 2 sons. He and his daughter, Helen, gave a chancel window in memory of Mrs Hinchliffe.

When the Church controlled the area, the vicar had the power to demand that people in the Cragg Vale Inn attend his Church services.

The Church was in the Parish of Halifax before becoming independent in 1844.

A figure of ChristThe Lord in Glory – was carved by Harry Percy Jackson, and two pairs of gates were carved by his son, Harry Percy Jackson.

Jimmy Savile, an acquaintance of Rev David Bennett, was made an honorary churchwarden here in 1967.

Graves of the Hinchliffe family are prominent in the churchyard.

Some of those who fell in World War I and World War II and are remembered on the War Memorial in the Church, are listed on the Foldout for the book Royd Regeneration.

A list of some of the Vicars of Saint John in the Wilderness, Cragg Vale is given in a separate Foldout

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP157): Baptisms [1815-1912], Marriages [1837-1987] and Burials [1815-1987].

See John Cockcroft's Charity, Cragg Vale Vicarage and David Wilcock

Saint John in the Wilderness, Cragg Vale: Graveyard
The graveyard of St John's Church, Cragg Vale

Saint John's Methodist Church, Prescott Street
Aka St John's Wesleyan Church.

When South Parade Methodist Chapel, Halifax was demolished to make way for the railway, it was replaced by a new church built at the junction of Prescott Street and Harrison Road, Halifax. The compensation from the railway company financed the building of this new church.

This Perpendicular Gothic church was designed by William Swinden Barber. The church opened on 1st October 1880.

A school building stood next to the church.

There was a large rose window in the church in memory of John Pritchard.

The pulpit of Caen stone was made by Thompsons of Peterborough.

The Church closed in 1965. It was demolished in September 1966.

Trinity Court flats stand on the site.

The congregation – together with those of three other Methodist churches – moved to St Andrew's Methodist Church, Huddersfield Road

Saint John's Mission Church, Hebden Bridge
Albert Street / Birchcliffe Road. In 1882, Rev George Sowden observed that a church was needed for the rapidly-growing Stubbings district in Hebden Bridge.

In August 1883, services were held in a room which had been acquired in Albert Street was used A site at Stubbings was purchased at a cost of £450 which was met by grants and bequests. On 21st May 1895, it was resolved that it was time for a building to be erected on the Stubbings site. Initial thoughts were to erect a temporary iron building, but it was felt that it would be better to acquire an adjoining piece of land and erect a stone building for use as a school and a chapel. This was opened on 4th April 1899, and cost about £2,000.

 
Subsequent Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

The building became St John's School

In her will of 1900, Mary Sowden bequeathed money for a church. On 26th June 1929, the foundation stone was laid by the Bishop of Wakefield. On 6th May 1931, the church was consecrated, the Bishop of Wakefield. The pulpit, the altar and the reredos were the work of Harry Percy Jackson.

The Church closed in the 1960s. It became a private house

Saint John's Mission Church, Rastrick
Built in 1893 and dedicated on 26th April 1893 as a mission church to serve the growing population – see Brick & Tile Company.

A new mission church was built in 1908.

In 1914, it was superseded by the church of St John, The Divine.

See St John's School, Rastrick

Saint John the Baptist's Chantry Chapel, Elland
The Chapel is on the south side of the Chancel at Elland Parish Church. It is a chantry chapel built by the Savile family in the 13th century.

This now houses the organ

Saint John the Baptist, Coley
The present Church was built in 1816-1818 to replace an earlier 16th century building.

See Coley Church Cricket Team, Coley Vicarage, Captain John Hodgson, John Northend, The Northowram Nonconformist Register, John Riley, Ryshworth's Chapel, Hipperholme, St John the Baptist, Coley: Graveyard, St Matthew's Mission Church, Coley and Watkinson Almshouses, Lightcliffe

Saint John the Baptist, Coley: Graveyard
There are burials in the churchyard around the Church of St John the Baptist, Coley.

In 18??, the burial were extended to ground beyond the east end of the Church.

The graveyard which stands in Coley Road, opposite the Church, dates from 1842

Saint John the Baptist Eastern Orthodox Church, Boothtown
Fern Street. Formerly Akroydon Wesleyan Methodist Church.

See Serbian Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity, Boothtown

Saint John the Baptist, Halifax
In early records, the name St John the Baptist usually refers to Halifax Parish Church, that is, St John the Baptist's Parish Church, Halifax

Saint John the Baptist, Halifax: Graveyard
The graveyard of Parish Church of St John the Baptist, Halifax.

The graveyard was closed to burials in the 19th century, although Catharine Grace Doherty Waterhouse was buried in the family vault in 1916.

See Halifax Parish Church: Railings and Burials inside Halifax Parish Church

Saint John the Baptist's Parish Church, Halifax

Saint John the Divine, Cliviger
The Church, the Graveyard, and Cliviger itself, lie outside Calderdale, but, being only 6 miles from Todmorden, they are/were used by many local people

Saint John the Divine, Cliviger: Graveyard
The Church of St John the Divine and the Graveyard, lie outside Calderdale, but, being only 6 miles from Todmorden, they are/were used by many local people

The following people, and/or members of their family, were buried and/or have memorials here:


 

Saint John the Divine, Rastrick
The sod cutting ceremony for the Church took place on 5th April 1913. The foundation stone was laid on 4th October 1913. The Church was consecrated in 1914.

It superseded the earlier mission church.

The organ was brought here from a cinema in Harrogate. Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

Since 2006, the Vicar of Rastrick has had responsibility for both this Church and St Matthew's Church, Rastrick

A list of some of the Vicars of Saint John The Divine, Rastrick is given in a separate Foldout

Saint John the Divine, Rishworth
The congregation used the chapel at Rishworth School until a new church, designed by Walsh & Maddock, was built.

The sod cutting ceremony for the new Church took place on 2nd April 1927.

The foundation stone is inscribed

In the faith of Jesus Christ

This Stone was set by J. R. H. Wheelwright Esq on the 28th day of May 1927

The Church was consecrated in 1928.

The east apple-and-pear window is a memorial to John Wheelwright.

Oak furnishings were carved by Harry Percy Jackson, and the Bishop's Chair by Jackson's son.

The lychgate was built in 1938.

See Godley, St John the Divine, Rishworth: Graveyard and St Matthew's Church, Rishworth

Saint John the Divine, Rishworth: Graveyard
The graveyard of St John the Divine, Rishworth

Saint John the Divine, Thorpe
Rochdale Road, Triangle.

Built for Frederick Edward Rawson and designed by W. S. Barber for a congregation of 300. It cost £7,000.

It was consecrated on 23rd September 1880, the year after Rawson's death.

It was one of the first churches to be constructed with reinforced concrete.

Mrs Rawson gave an endowment of £2,000 for the Vicar at the church. Until 1914, the appointment to the living was the gift of the Rawson family.

In 1882, schools for 200 children were built to the north of the church.

The altarpiece is of Caen stone. The cedar altar is the gift of Gerald Rawson. The windows – memorials to various members of the Rawson family – were by Heaton, Butler and Bayne of London.

The church and the windows were severely damaged by fire in 1917.

After raising about £5,000, the church was restored – by C. A. Nicholson – and reconsecrated on 17th June 1923.

In 1941, it was amalgamated with St Mary's, Cottonstones.

It closed with the final service on 9th June 1968.

The building was demolished in 1973. The font was moved to St George's Church, Sowerby.

 
Subsequent Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

The Vicar lived at St John's Home, Triangle.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP138): Baptisms [1880-1967] and Marriages [1887-1967].

See Henry Gaukroger

Saint John the Evangelist, Bradshaw
Designed in 1838 by Charles Child and built for Elizabeth Wadsworth who lived at Holdsworth House with her brother, Rev John Wadsworth. Mrs Berry gave land for the Church. Elizabeth Wadsworth gave £700.

The Church opened in February 1839. It accommodated 350 worshippers.

The Church underwent complete repair in 1853.

Bradshaw War Memorial stands at the road junction in front of the Church.

The altar rails and inner doors were carved by Harry Percy Jackson.

In 1858, a Conacher organ was installed at a cost of £110.

The east window was erected in memory of the Rev Edward Ramsden by J. T. Ramsden, of Jumples House, in 1877. At the south-east end, there is a memorial window to William and Hannah Dean, of Scausby Hall, Illingworth, and others in memory of James Wilcock, of Bradshaw, and William Wilcock, of Leeds.

The organ is placed in the gallery at the west end.

Bradshaw Sunday School stands nearby.

The Church is mentioned in Graptolite's Stray Notes on Bradshaw.

See Bradshaw Vicarage, William Dean, James Heginbottom, St John's Church, Bradshaw: Graveyard and Stray Notes on Bradshaw

A list of some of the Vicars of Saint John The Evangelist, Bradshaw is given in a separate Foldout

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP207): Banns [1888-1989].

Saint John the Evangelist, Bradshaw: Graveyard
The graveyard for St John's Church, Bradshaw

Saint John the Evangelist, Clifton
Rev Thomas Atkinson of Hartshead proposed the construction of a chapel for the people of Clifton who would otherwise have to travel to the church at Hartshead.

See Clifton Burial Ground, Clifton Handbell Ringers, Zillah Ramsden, St John the Evangelist, Clifton: Graveyard and Joseph Taylor

Saint John the Evangelist, Clifton: Graveyard
In the 1920s, the graveyard for St John the Evangelist, Clifton was full.

A new burial ground was established next to the vicarage

Saint John the Evangelist, Warley
Windle Royd Lane. In 1856, a small wooden church was built near the top of the lane.

A new Gothic building was built lower down the hill. This was designed by W. S. Barber. It cost £4,000. It was consecrated in 1878. It could accommodate a congregation of 342.

Henry Charles McCrea was one of the founding fathers of the Church, and the family headed the subscription list with a donation of £1,000. Later gifts to the church included the organ and 3 stained glass windows commemorating members of the family. Details of the organ in the Church can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

The Sunday school stands in front of the church and was used as a day school between 1873 and 1926.

The vicarage was designed by C. F. L. Horsfall.

There is a memorial lamp remembering those who died in World War II.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

Churchwardens here have included

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP54): Baptisms [1876-1985], Banns [1891-1991] and Marriages [1879-1995].

See Charles Thomas Aves, John Holdsworth and Walter Ernest Holmes

Saint John the Evangelist, West Vale
The Church was founded by Rev John Marshall, Vicar of Greetland.

See David Fox, Madame Anne Fox and John Graham Wheelwright

Saint John's Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Halifax
Stafford Square.

See William Teal

Saint Joseph's Catholic Church, Brighouse
Martin Street.

A chapel opened in 1864.

The present building opened on 29th June 1879 and was used as a school during the week and a church on Sundays.

 
Priests at the Church have included


 

During the Irish Riots of May 1882, a mob of Brighouse lads attacked the church. They smashed all the windows, but Father Morgan managed to remove all valuables, returning them when things had settled down.

In 1891, the new Church Hall was opened as an infants' school.

See St Joseph's School, Hove Edge

Saint Joseph's Church, Sowerby Bridge

Recorded in 1922, when the unveiling ceremony of a memorial remembering those who died in World War I, was performed by Colonel Sir Edward Whitley and was reported in The Yorkshire Post


Question: Can anyone tell me anything about the church?

 

Saint Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, Todmorden
Wellington Road. Until 1860, when a priest came from Halifax to hear confessions at Knowlwood, Walsden, Catholics had travelled to Bacup or Rochdale for services and Mass.

In 1864, the local Catholics rented a room over an iron foundry in Salford, Todmorden, where the first Mass was taken locally.

In 1866, the group moved to the Oddfellows Hall in Todmorden.

In September 1868, they moved to rented premises in Back Ridge Street.

Although the Catholics wished to build their own church, they were forbidden to buy land, but when the group approached Lord Townley of Burnley, a Catholic, he commissioned a land agent to buy land on Ridge Street, Todmorden on behalf of the Todmorden Catholic congregation. Work began on a school and church in 1873 and the buildings were completed and opened on 1st January 1876.

By 1928, the church was too small for the congregation and was in a state of disrepair, and it was decided to build a new one. In April 1929, a new church opened on Wellington Road.

The old church was used as air raid shelter during World War II, and was then demolished to make way for the Todmorden Community College.

St Joseph's Primary School is attached to the church.

 
Priests at the Church have included


 

Saint Jude's Church, Savile Park
Halifax.

In the late 19th century, a number of members of All Saints' Church, Dudwell became unhappy with the style of services at the church, and an offshoot – the Parish of St Jude's Salterhebble – was established.

A new Church building was proposed. Originally, this was to stand on what became the Nurses' Home at the Halifax Infirmary, but this fell through and, in 1888, John Baldwin gave 4,618 square yards of land – The Starting Post Field – at Savile Park for the new Church.

The Perpendicular building designed by W. S. Barber. The Church was built 1889-1890 at a cost of £8,400 pounds, and it was consecrated on 13th November 1890.

The tower is 85 ft high.

The Baldwin family – including William and John Baldwin – contributed to the cost of the building.

In 1910, John Herbert Lacy Baldwin and his sister, Mrs R. Whitworth, presented a stained glass window in memory of their father, John Baldwin.

The Vicarage was next to the Church.

Details of the organ in the Church can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

On 14th May 1915, the new clock was set in motion at the Church.

A memorial plaque for World War II was carved by Harry Percy Jackson [1948]

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP242): Baptisms [1890-1961] and Banns [1891-1964].

By 2014, the Church had joined with Holy Trinity Church.

See St Jude's Sunday School, Halifax

Saint Jude's Vicarage
The Vicarage for St Jude's Church, Savile Park was next to the Church (near 127 Savile Park Road) [1905]

Saint Luke's Church, Norland
Anglican church. Rev John Ellison was instrumental in establishing the Church. On 12th July 1865, the corner stone was laid. On 13th July 1865, Mrs H. A. Norris laid the foundation stone for the Church.

The Church opened in April 1866 as a chapel of ease for Christ Church, Sowerby Bridge.

The Church cost £900 to build.

The organ was built by W. Hawkins of Walsall. Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

On the night of Saturday, 17th February 1866, three weeks before the opening, vandals attempted to break into the Church and caused considerable damage to the main doors. A reward of £5 was offered for the apprehension of the culprits.

The infant son of Rev J. Ellison was the first person to be buried in the graveyard.

It became Norland Parish Church in 1877, when Rev Charles Livermore became the first Vicar.

The Vicarage stood in Sowerby Croft Lane.

Rev William Christopher Bell was said to have been heart-broken when the independent parish of Norland was discontinued and St Luke's Church amalgamated with Christ Church, Sowerby Bridge. He died shortly afterwards The 2 parishes amalgamated in 1923.

In Spring 2006, St Luke's reverted to being an independent ecclesiastical parish.

A list of some of the Vicars of Saint Luke's, Norland is given in a separate Foldout

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP93): Baptisms [1866-1995], Marriages [1880-1996] and Burials [1866-1987].

See St Luke's Church, Norland: Graveyard and Jabez Whitaker

Saint Luke's, Norland: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Luke's Church, Norland.

See John Eastwood

Saint Malachy's Catholic Church, Ovenden

Saint Marie's Catholic Church, Gibbet Street
See St Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Halifax

Saint Mark's Parish Church, Siddal
Siddal Parish Church

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP192): Baptisms [1880-2007], Banns [1915-1973] and Marriages [1915-1988].

See St Mark's Parish Church, Siddal: Graveyard, St Mark's Vicarage and Siddal War Memorial

Saint Mark's, Siddal: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Mark's Parish Church, Siddal.

Siddal War Memorial stands in the grounds

Saint Mark's Vicarage, Siddal
Whitegate Road. This is the vicarage for St Mark's Parish Church, Siddal.

See Vicars of St Mark's

Saint Martin's, Brighouse: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Martin's Church, Brighouse.

See Brighouse Parish Church Graveyard: MIs, Brighouse Parish Church: MIs and Brighouse Parish Church: Graves

Saint Martin's Parish Church, Brighouse

Saint Martin's Parsonage, Brighouse
Aka Brook House. The parsonage of Parish Church of St Martin, Brighouse was built in 1840. It was extended shortly afterwards.

It ceased to be the vicarage in 19??.

It was a nursing home for elderly residents. In 2003, it closed – a victim of draconian legislation which closed many nursing homes throughout Britain.

In 2004, it was converted into 3 private dwellings

Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones
Anglican church in the parish of Sowerby.

Aka St Mary's, Mill Bank, St Mary's, Sowerby.

The church was built with money left by Ellen Hadwen in her will of 1842. In 1845, her only surviving sister, Eliza, laid the foundation stone – with a time capsule containing Victorian coins. The church was named in memory of their sister Mary and their mother.

The cost was around £2,100. The church opened on 8th May 1848 and was supported by the Hadwen family.

The parish was created in 1848.

On 13th December 1914, a new organ was installed.

In 1941, the church was amalgamated with St John's Church, Thorpe.

After World War II, the church used reparations for bomb damage – caused when a V1 doodlebug fell at Little Toothill Farm, Sowerby on 24th December 1944 - to repoint the church tower.

In 1950, a memorial window to Eric Platt was unveiled.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included
 

A social centre opened in a part of the Church.

Both St Mary's Church and St Peter's Church, Sowerby are now in the same parish.

The graveyard at the church is open and in use.

The church is used for Eucharist every Sunday, for baptisms, weddings and funerals, and for special services on Palm Sunday, Christmas and Harvest. The children from St Mary's Primary School at Mill Bank also worship at the Church.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP138): Baptisms [1848-1984], Marriages [1848-1983] and Burials [1848-1953].

See Henry Gaukroger and St Mary's Vicarage, Cottonstones

Saint Mary's Church, Halifax
The Anglican church stood at the corner of Lister Lane and Rhodes Street, Halifax.

It was designed by Mallinson & Barber.

It was the gift of Michael Stocks of Upper Shibden Hall, in memory of his wife and their son Michael. The cost of the construction was about £10,000.

It was consecrated on 4th July 1870 by the Bishop of Ripon

It accommodated 800 worshippers [1881].

The organ was built by William Hill.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

The congregation amalgamated with St James's Church, Halifax – becoming St Mary's & St James's – in 1952.

The church closed in 1986 and became redundant. The building was bought by Strafford Properties who stripped out the fittings and then allowed the building to deteriorate until it was demolished in 2000.

Unbelievably, the Evening Courier of 21st February 2000 said

In a bid to limit damage to the church, the interior had been stripped and all the roof tiles put in storage

There is now housing on the site.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP170): Baptisms [1870-1953] and Marriages [1871-1957].

See St James & St Mary Church of England, Halifax, St Mary's School, Halifax, St Mary's Vicarage, Halifax and Parish of St Mary's, Halifax

Saint Mary's Church, Sowerby

Saint Mary's Church, Todmorden: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Mary's Church, Todmorden

Saint Mary's Church, Wyke
Opened in 18??

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Bradford (Collection BDP101): Baptisms [1844-1960/1961-1998], Banns [1921-1988], Marriages [1847-1988] and Burials [1847-1982].

Saint Mary's, Cottonstones: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Mary's Church, Cottonstones

Saint Mary Magdalene Church, Outlane
Aka Outlane Parish Church. Built 1911. The church was not made a parish church because it was also used as a community meeting room. Consecrated 25th January 2004 The church was in the Longwood parish of Huddersfield until 1978 when the M62 was built. It then fell within the Stainland parish which will now become the parish of Stainland and Outlane

Saint Mary's Parish Church, Todmorden
Burnley Road. This was the first chapel in the Todmorden district.

See All Saints' Church, Harley Wood, William Greenwood, Jeremy Hauworth, Josiah Lord, St Mary's Graveyard, Todmorden and Todmorden Burial Ground

Saint Mary's Preaching Room, Todmorden
Opened in 18??. It reopened on 20th September 1868. Rev James Whalley preached his first sermon

Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Halifax
Aka St Marie's Roman Catholic Church. 35 Gibbet Street / Clarence Street.

Between 1830 and 1837, Catholics had worshipped at the Assembly Rooms in Woolshops and in Harrison Road – see Rev Joseph W. Fairclough and Rev Thomas Keily.

Irish immigration brought an increasing number of Catholics to the district, and St Mary's was built to serve the growing Catholic population in Halifax.

The foundation stone was laid in 1836. The Church opened in 1839

It accommodated 460 people.

Local papers described it as a

Popish Mass House

This was the first Roman Catholic church to be built in Halifax since Henry VIII and the Reformation. F. A. Leyland gave a font, stained glass windows and a screen to the Church.

Because no Roman Catholic church could be consecrated until it was permanent and free from debt, the Church was only consecrated on 28th July 1934.

In October 1863, it was badly damaged by a storm.

It was restored by general subscription [1868].

It accommodated 700 worshippers.

Services were also conducted at St Joseph's School Room, Godley Bridge and Assembly Rooms, Halifax.

Details of the organ in the Church can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

In 1846, St Mary's school was built.

 
Priests at the Church have included


 

See St Alban's Catholic Church, Halifax and St Mary's Catholic Club, Halifax

Saint Mary the Virgin, Elland: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Mary the Virgin, Elland.

See Elland Cemetery

Saint Mary the Virgin, Elland Parish Church

Saint Mary the Virgin, Illingworth
Aka Illingworth Chapel.

Transcription of the Parish Registers are shown in the CD entitled Parish Registers: Saint Mary's, Illingworth.

See Illingworth Vicarage, Tom Parker, Captain George Taylor Ramsden, St Mary's Sunday School, Illingworth, St Mary the Virgin, Illingworth: Graveyard and The Story of St Mary's Illingworth

Saint Mary the Virgin, Illingworth: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Mary the Virgin, Illingworth

Saint Mary the Virgin, Luddenden
Luddenden Parish Church stands near Luddenden Brook. There have been 3 churches on the site.

See James Bradley, Luddenden Bridge, Luddenden Cemetery, St Mary's School, Luddenden, St Mary the Virgin, Graveyard and Vicarage Mill, Luddenden

Saint Mary the Virgin, Luddenden: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Mary the Virgin, Luddenden.

The Graveyard and St Mary's Church are connected to Luddenden Cemetery by a bridge.

There is a stone cross in the Graveyard.


I am not yet clear about who was buried here and who was buried at Luddenden Cemetery. I hope to sort these out as soon as possible. Please email me if you can place anyone correctly in either burial ground
 

See Luddenden Cemetery Loo, Murgatroyd tomb, Luddenden and The Shepherd family : Luddenden Burials

Saint Mary the Virgin, Luddendenfoot: Graveyard
The graveyard of Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin, Luddendenfoot still remains though the Church has been demolished

Saint Mary's Vicarage, Cottonstones
This was the vicarage for St Mary's Church, Cottonstones

Saint Mary's Vicarage, Halifax
The Vicarage for St Mary's Church, Halifax was at 20 Francis Street. The building is dated 1873.

The Parsonage and schools were built in 1873. Michael Stocks, of Upper Shibden Hall, gave £1000 towards the cost; the rest was raised by public subscription.

Saint Mary's&44; Halifax, Parish of
The parish for St Mary's Church, Halifax was formed in 1870

Saint Matthew's Church, Lightcliffe
Consecrated on 22nd September 1875 to replace the Lightcliffe Old Church.

See C. E. Fucigna, Lightcliffe Vicarage, St Matthew's Church: Stone-laying accident [1873], St Matthew's Church, Lightcliffe: Graveyard and Watkinson Almshouses, Lightcliffe

Saint Matthew's Church, Northowram
Back Clough, Bradford Road. The Parish of Northowram split off from Coley in 1909.

The Gothic parish church was designed by Walsh & Nicholas.

The first sod was cut on the site on 24th September 1910. The foundation stone was laid on 1st January 1911. The Church was consecrated on 31st May 1913.

This was the first permanent Anglican church in the township.

Brothers, Samuel Lord Watkinson and George Watkinson, were instrumental in, and both contributed to, the building of the church. In 1911, Samuel Lord Watkinson gave £3,000 for the tower, the bells, and a clock.

The church was consecrated in 1912.

The lawned area behind the Church was formerly a quarry.

An organ by Conacher was installed in 1914. Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

The reredos, organ casing, and stalls were carved by Harry Percy Jackson.

There is a memorial plaque remembering those who died in World War I and World War II.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP114): Baptisms [1893-1970], Banns [1913-1997] and Marriages [1913-1996].

See Heywood's Chapel, St Matthew's Church, Northowram: Vicarage, St Matthew's Church, Northowram: Graveyard, St Matthew's Sunday School, Northowram and Watkinson Almshouses, Lightcliffe

Saint Matthew's Church, Northowram: Vicarage
Church Walk The Vicarage for St Matthew's Church, Northowram.

During the incumbency of Canon George Watkinson, he lived at Woodfield. His Curate lived at the Vicarage

Saint Matthew's Church, Rastrick
One of the oldest places of worship in the district.

See Rastrick Vicarage, St Matthew's Church School, Rastrick, St Matthew's Church, Rastrick: Graveyard and Upper Wat Ing, Norland

Saint Matthew's Church, Rishworth
The church was popularly known as The Iron Church, The Tin Tabernacle, and The Tin Tab because it was constructed of galvanised iron sheets on a wooden frame.

It was built in 1890 when the facilities at what became Rishworth School Chapel were inadequate.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

The church became redundant and closed in 1927 when St John's Church, Rishworth was built.

All traces of the Church have gone

Saint Matthew's, Lightcliffe: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Matthew's Church, Lightcliffe

Saint Matthew's Mission Church, Coley
Back Clough. On 16th November 1891, a license for a mission room was issued to Coley Church. This opened in 18??.

A new chancel was dedicated on 31st May 1905 by Rev Canon Savage.

Rev George Watkinson was curate here

Saint Matthew's, Northowram: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Matthew's Church, Northowram

Saint Matthew's, Rastrick: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Matthew's Church, Rastrick.

A Mediæval cross base stands by the entrance to the churchyard.

There is a small war memorial in the churchyard

Saint Michael & All Angels' Church, Cornholme
Burnley Road. Cornholme parish church was designed by Durham architect, Hodgson Fowler. It was built on the site of the Vale Bobbin Mill. The founder-patron, Mrs Masters-Whittaker, gave the site and paid the entire cost of the building. Opened on 27th September 1902.

The Parish of Cornholme was created in 1903.

There is a memorial plaque remembering those who fell in World War I and World War II. The war memorial from Mount Zion Methodist Church, Cornholme was moved here in 1985.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

In 1903, a clock
a gift from the Rev and Mrs Master-Whittaker

was installed in the tower

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP84): Baptisms [1903-1952], Banns [1903-1987] and Marriages [1903-2000].

Saint Michael's & All Angels' Church, Shelf
A Million Pound Church designed by Mallinson & Healey. Built in 1850 for the new Parish of Shelf. It was erected and endowed by John Hardy Esq of Low Moor, who was also patron of the living.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

Many members of the Bottomley family of Shelf are buried here.

There is a memorial plaque and a memorial window remembering those who fell in World War I.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Halifax (Collection BDP82): Baptisms [1850-1989], Banns [1923-1989], Marriages [1850-1979] and Burials [1850-1978].

See St Michael's & All Angels' Church, Shelf: Graveyard and Shelf Vicarage

Saint Michael's & All Angels' Church, Southowram Bank
Mission church on Southowram Bank. Opened 30th April 1887. The cost of the church was defrayed by Mrs Waterhouse.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

Demolished in 196?. A private house now stands on the site.

There was a memorial plaque remembering those who died in World War I but this has been lost. It has been suggested that this is now in Halifax Parish Church.

The church cricket club played at Bank Top Cricket Field, Southowram.

See St Michael's Mission Church, Halifax

Saint Michael's & All Angels', Shelf: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Michael's & All Angels' Church, Shelf

Saint Michael's Church, Mytholmroyd
The foundation stone was laid on 6th September 1847, and the Church was consecrated on 8th September 1848.

See Mary Helena Greenwood, Mytholmroyd Church Lads' Brigade, St Michael's Church, Mytholmroyd: Graveyard and William Sutcliffe

Saint Michael's Mission Church, Elland
Lower Edge. Opened around 1905

Saint Michael's Mission Church, Halifax
Southowram Bank.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

See St Michael's & All Angels' Church, Southowram Bank

Saint Michael's, Mytholmroyd: Graveyard
The graveyard for St Michael's Church, Mytholmroyd

Saint Nicholas's Chapel, Elland
The Chapel is on the north side of the Chancel at Elland Parish Church. It is a chantry chapel built by the Thornhill family of Fixby in the 13th century.

The vault for the Thornhill family lies beneath the Chapel, and was rediscovered in 1937.

The Chapel was restored by the Wilson family in 1938.

The Wilsons also gave examples of the work of Robert Thompson to the Chapel

Saint Patrick's Catholic Church, Elland
Victoria Road, Elland. Built in 1959. Opened 24th October 1960 to replace St Patrick's Church, West Vale

Saint Patrick's Catholic Church, Halifax
Well Lane. The church was established in the 1920s in a room at a mill in Well Lane, by Father Michael Bradley of the Church of the Sacred Heart & St Bernard's Church, to serve the large Irish community living in the Woolshops area


Question: Does anyone know the identity of the mill where the church was set up?

 

Saint Patrick's Catholic Church, West Vale
Green Lane. Services were held at Elland Mechanics' Hall until the church opened in January 1902. It was formally opened on 10th May 1903.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

The Church closed in 1959, when the new St Patrick's Church, Elland was opened. The premises were taken over by St Patrick's Primary School and then a Day Nursery

Saint Paul's Church, Cross Stone
From 1536, it served the Yorkshire part of Todmorden, while St Mary's Parish Church served the Lancashire part.

See Baptisms at the Chapels of Heptonstall & Cross Stone, Burials at the Chapels of Heptonstall & Cross Stone, John Craweshaye, Cross Stone School, Cross Stone Parsonage, Cross Stone stocks, Mrs Sally Walton, Marriages at the Chapels of Heptonstall & Cross Stone, Peter Ormerod, St Paul's Church, Cross Stone: Graveyard, Thomas Stansfeld, John Sutcliffe and Water Trough, Cross Stone

Saint Paul's Church, King Cross
A Million Pound Church designed by R. D. Chantrell in 1845 to accommodate a congregation of 450. The church was consecrated on 26th April 1847.

Details of the organ in the Church can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

The Church became too small and closed, with the last services being held on 20th October 1912.

There was a war memorial remembering those who served in World War I and World War II Sir Edward Whitley [29th November 1920].

A new St Paul's Church was proposed in 1909 and building began at a site on Queens Road in 1911.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

Part of the roof collapsed in 1930.

On 1st October 1930, a Consistory Court looked into proposed demolition of the Church.

The Church was demolished in 1931, leaving only the spire still standing.

The spire is listed.

Burials in the graveyard continued until 1969.

When the Halifax Union Workhouse was demolished in 1972, the mechanism of the clock – known as Miriam – was removed from there and installed in the spire at St Paul's.

The site was redeveloped as a rest garden, with some gravestones being removed and others being erected around the garden or used as paving stones, and the garden was opened on May 3, 1973, by Maurice Jagger.

The font from the old St Paul's Church stands in the churchyard of the new St Paul's Church.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP72): Baptisms [1847-1965], Banns [1914-1956], Marriages [1847-1980] and Burials [1847-1941].

See Henry Gaukroger, Cookson Greenwood, King Cross Vicarage, Halifax, St Paul's Mission Church, Pye Nest and Wainhouse Road School, Halifax

Saint Paul's Church, Queens Road
In 1909, When the old St Paul's Church, King Cross became too small, the new church to accommodate 1,000 was begun.

The land was given by 2 anonymous donors.

The Church was designed by Sir Charles Nicholson, 2nd Baronet, and Jackson & Fox were the superintending architects. The first sod was cut on 25th October 1910. The foundation stone, inscribed

Ye are God's Building, Easter 1911

was laid on 22nd April 1911 by Rev Clement E. Danby.

Stone for the building came from Northowram and Hipperholme, and that for the interior came from Sowerby.

The church was consecrated 26th October 1912. It accommodated 1,000 worshippers.

The altar rail gates were carved by Harry Percy Jackson in the 1920s and extended by his son.

The font from the old St Paul's Church, King Cross stands in the churchyard.

The Sunday School was built around 1926.

The tower was built later – with a bequest from Rev Hugh Bright – and dedicated in 1937. The East Window is dedicated to Rev Hugh Bright

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

There is a war memorial inside the church.

Saint Paul's Church, Queens Road: East Window
The window at St Paul's Church, Queens Road is dedicated to Rev Hugh Bright. The design features The New Jerusalem. It is by stained-glass artist Hugh Easton [1906-1965]

Saint Paul's Church, Todmorden
Cross Stone Road. A Million Pound Church designed by John Oates and Thomas Pickersgill in 1833-35. After a landslip, the building became unsafe and is now closed.

See Cross Stone Cemetery and St Paul's Church, Todmorden: Graveyard

Saint Paul's, Cross Stone: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Paul's Church, Cross Stone. – aka Cross Stone Cemetery – was consecrated on 14th October 1856.

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the book entitled Burials at the Chapels of Heptonstall & Cross Stone, and also on the Todmorden & Walsden website at MIs at Cross Stone Church and MIs at Cross Stone Church: Epitaphs

Saint Paul's, King Cross: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Paul's Church, King Cross.

The church was demolished in 1931.

Burials in the graveyard continued until 1969.

The site was redeveloped as a rest garden, with some gravestones being removed and others being erected around the garden or used as paving stones. The garden was opened on 3rd May 1973, by Maurice Jagger. The human remains were undisturbed.

See St Paul's, King Cross: MIs

Saint Paul's Methodist Chapel, Brighouse
King Street. When the Bridge End Congregational Church of 1779 was replaced by the present building in 1856. The old chapel building was bought by Charles Brooke of Rastrick, who rebuilt it on Hangram Field for use as a chapel-of-ease for Brighouse Parish Church with Rev J. Birch.

After a year, it was decided that the building was unsuitable for Anglican worship. A band of Wesleyan Methodists, who had been ejected from Park Chapel and had been holding their services at Mary Bedford's Charity School, bought the chapel for £532 and reopened it. Emmanuel Dale was one of the first trustees.

Opened in 1857. The first minister was Rev J. Birch.

A Sunday school was built at a cost of £850 and opened on 16th April 1865.

A new church was built when the old building became too small for the congregation, and opened on 27th October 1885. The new Sunday School opened in 1914.

The Co-op café was in the basement of the church.

On 9th December 1933, it was announced that the Church was to be sold.

The church closed in 1949, and was demolished in the 1950s.

The site became a wire-works.

The [former Co-operative Society] car park [1973] now occupies the site.

See Grace Blackburn, Brighouse Industrial Society and Emmanuel Dale

Saint Paul's Methodist Chapel, Elland
A Methodist school chapel opened on the site in 1891.

The foundation stone was laid on 11th July 1914. The new chapel opened on 5th June 1915. Aka United Methodist Church, Elland.

In 1962, Temperance Methodist Chapel joined St Paul's.

In 1972, Elland Wesleyan Chapel and Middle Dean Street Chapel, West Vale joined St Paul's, services being held at the Elland Wesley chapel.

The St Paul's building was refurbished.

In 1974, the services were moved back to St Paul's and the name was changed to Southgate Methodist Chapel, Elland.

 
Subsequent Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

See Samuel Garsed

Saint Paul's Methodist Chapel, Sowerby Bridge
Tower Hill / Tuel Lane. It superseded United Methodist Free Church, Sowerby Bridge. It was modernised in 1979.

It was badly damaged by a suspected arson attack on Easter Day in April 1988.

A new church opened in October 1990.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

Saint Paul's Mission Church, Pye Nest
Recorded in 1905 at 83 Pye Nest Gate / 88 Washer Lane.

This was a mission church for St Paul's Church, King Cross

Saint Paul's Spiritual Church & Lyceum, Halifax
Alma Street. Recorded in 1905.


Question: Does anyone know if this was connected with the Lyceum Assembly Rooms, Halifax?

 

See Joseph Batie

Saint Peter & Saint Paul's Catholic Church, Mytholmroyd
It was originally a small wire-works – which evolved into Wireform. In the 1960s, Father Blanchfield bought the building and converted it into a chapel. In 19??, it was sold to the Calder Valley Club for £1·00 after it had become structurally unsafe. In 1991, it was replaced by the Good Shepherd Catholic Church, Mytholmroyd. It is now a community care centre for the disabled

Saint Peter's Church, Hartshead
This was the Parish church for Hartshead-cum-Clifton.

See Grange House, Warley and St Mark's Eve Vigil

Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby
St Peter's Avenue. Aka Sowerby Chapel.

A chapel of ease was established here around 1592.

The new church was built between 1763-1766 by John Wilson.

Transcription of the Parish Registers are shown in the CD entitled Parish Registers: Saint Peter's, Sowerby.

See Church Stile, Sowerby, Furness Charity, St Paul's Church, King Cross and St Peter's Church, Sowerby: Graveyard

Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby: Belfry
When the new St Peter's Church, Sowerby was built in 1762, the old chapel was dismantled.

The belfry, windows and other features from the old chapel were bought by George Stansfeld and move to Field House, Sowerby

Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby: World War I Memorial
A memorial plaque remembering those who died in World War I

Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby: World War II Memorial
A memorial plaque remembering those who died in World War II

Saint Peter's Church, Walsden
Aka Walsden Parish Church. The church was consecrated on 7th August 1848.

See Cross Keys, Walsden, St Peter's Church, Walsden: Graveyard and Walsden Parsonage

Saint Peter's Community Centre, Sowerby

Saint Peter's, Hartshead: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Peter's Church, Hartshead

Saint Peter's Mission Church, Brookfoot
A day school – St Peter's School – opened in 1878. The church opened in 1895 to serve the community around Brookfoot. Stood on the right of the road which leads from Elland Road to Brookfoot mill.

Reports of a storm on 22nd December 1894, mentioned that

A new mission church at Brookfoot was demolished


Question: Does anyone know if this was the Church damaged by the storm?

 

It was a part of the parish of St Anne's in the Grove Church, Southowram.

 
Officers at the Mission have included

  • H. Atkinson [1933]

  • W. Atkinson [1933]

  • W. H. Wilkinson [1933]

  • R. Atkinson [1933]

  • R. Ellis [1933]

  • G. Coverdale [1933]

  • A. Fearnley – Organist [1933]

  • S. Hoyle – Verger/Sexton [1933]

 

When attendances fell, the church closed in 1959, and the building was sold

Saint Peter's Mission Church, Wheatley
City Lane. Now St Peter's Cottage.

See St George's Church, Ovenden

Saint Peter's, Sowerby: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Peter's Church, Sowerby surrounds the Church

Saint Peter's, Walsden: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Peter's Church, Walsden

Saint Stephen's Church, Copley

Saint Stephen's, Copley: Graveyard
The graveyard for St Stephen's Church, Copley

Saint Teresa's Church, Halifax
In 1935, the church was served from Ovenden

Saint Thomas à Becket's Catholic Church

Saint Thomas à Becket's Church, Heptonstall

Saint Thomas à Becket, Heptonstall: Graveyard

Saint Thomas à Becket Mission Room
Hangingroyd Lane, Hebden Bridge. A mission room associated with the Church of St Thomas à Becket is mentioned in 1888

Saint Thomas à Becket's Parish Church, Heptonstall

Saint Thomas, Charlestown
See St Thomas the Apostle, Claremount

Saint Thomas's Church, Greetland
This is now the Parish Church for Greetland and West Vale.

See Greetland Vicarage, St Thomas's Church, Greetland: Graveyard, St Thomas's Sunday School, Greetland and The Stations of the Cross

Saint Thomas's, Greetland: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Thomas's Church, Greetland.

By 1928, the graveyard was becoming overcrowded. There were proposals to buy land to the north of the burial ground which was owned by the District Council. In 1931, the Council offered to sell the land. A house-to-house collection in Greetland and West Vale raised £160 in a week towards the purchase.

Saint Thomas's Mission Room, Halifax
Recorded in 1905 at 16 Pearson Street, Charlestown Road

Saint Thomas of Canterbury Catholic Church, Hebden Bridge
Palace House Road, Fairfield. Aka St Thomas à Becket's Catholic Church.

The Church was founded by Father Maximilian Tilliman, replacing converted premises – a large room in Union Street – which had become too small. The Church was designed by Willie Wrigley. It was built at a cost of £1,530, largely by the congregation themselves. It opened on 31st October 1896. It could accommodate 400 people.

 
Priests at the Church have included


 

In 1991, it was superseded by the Good Shepherd Catholic Church, Mytholmroyd.

The Church has been converted into flats

Saint Thomas Street Methodist Church, Boothtown
Opened in 18??

 
Subsequent Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

Saint Thomas the Apostle's Church, Heptonstall

Saint Thomas the Apostle, Claremount
Halifax. Aka St Thomas's, Charlestown.

The Church was designed by Mallinson & Healey [1857-1861]. The corner stone was laid on 1st April 1859. The Church opened on 22nd April 1860.

It accommodated 650 people.

In 1911-1912, Jackson & Fox made repairs to the Church.

On 14th September 1912, the Church reopened after the removal of the old gallery, enlargement of the church and installation of a new altar.

The Church originally had a spire on the tower, but this was unsafe and was demolished in 1967.

A memorial window was placed by R. Horsfall for his wife.

The Church is a familiar landmark on the northern skyline.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

There are memorials remembering those who died in World War I and World War II.

St Thomas Street used to be nearby.

The Vicarage was at Parsonage Street, Claremount.

The records for the Church are held at the West Yorkshire Archive Service office in Wakefield (Collection WDP33): Baptisms [1858-1953], Banns [1901-1934], Marriages [1862-1987] and Burials [1860-1970].

See Parish of Charlestown, St Thomas's Church School, St Thomas the Apostle, Claremount: Graveyard and St Thomas's Cricket Club, Claremount

Saint Thomas the Apostle, Claremount: Graveyard
The graveyard of St Thomas the Apostle, Claremount

Saint Thomas The Apostle, Heptonstall: Graveyard

Saint Thomas the Apostle's Parish Church, Heptonstall

Saint Thomas the Martyr, Heptonstall

Saint Thomas Vicarage, Claremount
The Vicarage for St Thomas the Apostle, Claremount was on Parsonage Street, Claremount

Saint Walburga's Catholic Church, Luddendenfoot
Local Catholic services were held in the Luddendenfoot Co-operative Hall. The new church was founded by Father Maximilian Tilliman. The church opened in 1897. It was built at a cost of £1,600. Using figures for average earnings, £1,600 in 1897 is roughly the equivalent of £744,000.00 today.

In 1935, it was served from Hebden Bridge.

In 1991, it was replaced by the Good Shepherd Catholic Church, Mytholmroyd.

In 1996, the church was demolished. The new St John of God Respite Care Home was built on the site [1997]

Salem
An Arabic / Hebrew word meaning peaceful, complete

Salem Methodist Church, Richmond Street
Halifax. Stands on Richmond Street between Alma Street and Stannary Street

The Church opened on 20th January 1970 to accommodate the congregation from Salem Methodist New Connexion Chapel, North Parade which had to close when the road system in the area was redeveloped.

The present building was opened by Miss Elsie Seed of the Seed family who was the oldest active member in 1970.

Joshua Horner dedicated a fine stained glass window at the old Salem Chapel in memory of his father John who had been a member there. When the chapel was demolished, the architect intended these windows should be re-installed in the new building, but the Department of Transport refused to pay the cost. The blind windows at the back of the building show where the stained glass was to have gone.

It became a joint Church with Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Church.

The Sunday School was immediately next door to the west.

Details of the organ in the Church can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

Salem Methodist New Connexion Chapel, North Parade
The first Salem Chapel was begun by a group who left South Parade Methodist Chapel in 1797, and went to worship in rooms in Ann Street.

They bought land in Needless and built a new Chapel which opened in 1799.

It was rebuilt in 1815.

A new Chapel was built in 1871.

See Akroyd Place, Halifax, Hanover Methodist Chapel, Halifax, Horner Charity Bequest, St Andrew's Methodist Chapel, Queens Road, Salem Methodist New Connexion, North Parade: Graveyard, Salem Methodist New Connexion Sunday School, North Parade and Salem North Parade Pierrot Troupe

Salem Methodist New Connexion Chapel, North Parade: Graveyard
There was a burial ground around Salem Methodist New Connexion Chapel.

The Chapel and the burial ground closed in 1964 and the land was cleared for the Burdock Way redevelopment.

The remains from the Burial Ground were reinterred at Stoney Royd Cemetery [1960s]

Salem Primitive Methodist Chapel, Knowlwood
Walsden.

Built in 1826 by the Primitive Methodists who had previously held their meetings at Smithy Holme Mill, Walsden. An early and controversial preacher was Mr Hutchins.

The chapel was enlarged in 1843.

In 1870, it was entirely rebuilt. The corner-stone was laid on 2nd July 1870 by James S. Sutcliffe of Bacup.

 
Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

Crossley Howorth was choirmaster for 20 years.

The Chapel was demolished in the 1960s. The congregation moved to Shade Wesleyan Church.

See Bottoms School, Walsden, Abraham Crossley and Luke Midgley

Salem Wesleyan Chapel, Hebden Bridge
44 Market Street. The original chapel was built in 1824 and had seating for 750.

In 1885, it was replaced by a new chapel with seating for 1050. There was a schoolroom downstairs.

There was a Sunday School at 50 Market Street.

In June 1888, a large, 3-manual organ was installed.

It joined the Todmorden Circuit, and became head of the Hebden Bridge Circuit.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

In March 1906, Owd Mow preached here.

In 1962, Cross Lanes Methodists, Foster Lane Methodists, and Salem Wesleyan Methodists amalgamated.

The church was demolished in 1973 and replaced by a new building – Hebden Bridge Methodist Church – in 1975

Salendine Nook Baptist Chapel: Graveyard
The burial ground for Salendine Nook Baptist Chapel

Salendine Nook Baptist Church
Laund Road.

In October 1689, Michael Morton registered his barn at Salendine Nook as a meeting house for Dissenters. This evolved into Salendine Nook Baptist Church

The Church is the mother Church of Huddersfield and District Baptist Churches.

A meeting house was opened on Joseph Morton's land [1743]. It subsequently had a strong contingent of followers including many leading figures in local society. The Church started a dedication register in 1783 which it continued until 1837 when the civil registration acts were created.

The meeting house was replaced by a larger one in 1803.

The current Baptist Church was built in 1843.

The Church was attended by many Baptists from the neighbouring townships of Lindley-cum-Quarmby, Longwood and Golcar.

 
Subsequent Ministers at the Chapel have included

  • Rev D. W. Jenkins [1895]

 

See Jagger Green Baptist Church, Holywell Green and Salendine Nook Baptist Church: Graveyard

Salterhebble, Parish of
Aka Parish of All Saints. The parish for All Saints' Church, Dudwell was formed in 1845

Salterhebble United Methodist Free Chapel
Chapel Lane. The land was bought in 1865. Trustees for the church were appointed around January 1894, and a mortgage was taken out in December 1895. The church was built in 1895.

 
Subsequent Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

It closed in 19??.

In March 1965, it was renovated and became the Christadelphian Hall. The renovated pipe organ was recently found to be dated April 1888, predating the building.

See Horace Sykes

Salterhebble Wesleyan Reform Chapel
Recorded in 1865.

See Rev H. Breedon

Salterlee Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Stump Cross
Kell Lane. Recorded in 1905

Salvation Army Barracks, Halifax
Several are recorded in 1905 at Coach Fold, Haley Hill; 3 Ashleigh Street, Ovenden; 2 Foundry Street North, Ovenden; 39 Copley Street; Bedford Street North

Salvation Army Church, Elland
See Christ's Chapel, Elland and Salvation Army Meeting Room, Elland

Salvation Army Church, Holmfield
Aka Salvation Army Fort. Recorded in 1917

Salvation Army Citadel, Brighouse
The Salvation Army moved here from Stott's Mission, Brighouse.

The foundation stones for a new building in Bethel Street were laid on 12th February 1910. The Citadel was opened on 3rd September 1910 by Mayor Robert Thornton.

The Army later moved to the former St Paul's Wesleyan Methodist Sunday School in King Street. The Bethel Street premises became a children's play facility.

See Brighouse Old Market and Billy Walton

Salvation Army Citadel, Halifax
North Parade. Opened in 1910.

Closed in 1969 and demolished for the Burdock Way redevelopment.

A new purpose-built centre – the Bramwell Booth Memorial Halls – opened on St James's Road in May 1970.

Salvation Army Citadel, Sowerby Bridge
Recorded in the 1940s. The building was subsequently occupied by Lumb's Confectionery

Salvation Army Meeting Room, Elland
Recorded in 1905 at Central Hall, Elland

Sandy Gate Burial Ground, Hebden Bridge

Savile Green Vicarage, Halifax
In 1870, Rev Charles Musgrave sold the earlier vicarage – which stood opposite Halifax Parish Church – and its extensive grounds to the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway and the Leeds, Bradford & Halifax Railway company, and the vicarage moved to Savile Green which had been bought by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners.

Scholemoor Cemetery & Crematorium
Necropolis Road, Bradford.

The public cemetery opened in 1860. The crematorium was opened in 19??.

Several Calderdale people, and/or members of their family, were buried / cremated here, including:


George Normanton [1937]
 

Scout Road Wesleyan Chapel, Mytholmroyd
A Georgian chapel was built in 1806. It was rebuilt in 1815 and 1825.

It accommodated 800 worshippers [1845]. It was extended when the Sunday school was built in 1872. The church has mahogany box pews downstairs. There is late 19th century seating in the gallery.

A new organ was installed on 24th October 1903.

When Mount Zion Primitive Methodist Church, Mytholmroyd closed in August 1960, the society joined with Scout Road to become Mytholmroyd Methodist Church.

A new extension was added in 1999

 
Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

A memorial plaque remembering those who died in World War I and World War II was brought here from Mount Zion Methodist Church, Mytholmroyd.

Some of those who fell in World War I and World War II and are remembered on the War Memorial in the Church, are listed on the Foldout for the book Royd Regeneration.

See Scout Road Wesleyan Chapel, Mytholmroyd: Graveyard and Abimelech Wilcock

Scout Road Wesleyan Chapel, Mytholmroyd: Graveyard
The graveyard for Scout Road Wesleyan Chapel, Mytholmroyd

Second Church of Christ Scientist, Halifax
Aked's Road.

See Church of Christ Scientist and Mount Olivet Church, Aked's Road

The Sepulchre, Hartshead
Hare Park Lane. Private burial ground for the Quaker Greene family.

Dated 1665.

The Quakers regarded elaborate gravestones as a symbol of vanity, and – as here – each stone was identical to the others.

Serbian Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity, Boothtown

See Yorkshire Film Archive

Seventh Day Adventist Church, Copley
Originally United Methodist Free Church.

The Conacher pipe organ [1877] was on a balcony at the front, above the preacher's stand. In 1969, the church fitted a suspended ceiling which hid the organ. In 1999, Ireland-Shireby Church Organ Builders of Grantham bought the delapidated and vandalised organ for restoration.

In February 2003, as the building was being demolished and the site cleared, workers discovered a glass container – a Kilner jar – inside one of the corner stones of the facade

Shade Chapel
Opened in 18??

Shade Wesleyan Methodist Church
Todmorden. A Church was built in 1848. It stands on a culvert

The corner-stones for a new Church were laid on 18th December 1875. The Church opened on 12th April 1877.

The congregation from Knowlwood Chapel moved here when their chapel was demolished in the 1960s.

The chapel closed in 19??.

It has since been converted into flats

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

Shelf Congregational Church
Designed by J. P. Pritchett

Shelf, Parish of
Shelf was a part of Halifax parish. In 1851, it became a separate parish. St Michael's & All Angels' Church was built in 1850

Shelf Primitive Methodist Chapel
Aka Wade House Chapel

Shelf Tabernacle
Aka Stone Chair Tabernacle

Shelf Vicarage
The vicarage for St Michael's & All Angels' Church, Shelf. Originally the iron master's house for Shelf Iron Works.

It stood empty after a new vicarage was built in the 1980s. It is now derelict

Shelf Wesleyan Chapel
Aka Witchfield Methodist Chapel

Shibden Methodist New Connexion Chapel
Opened in 1862.

On 3rd May 1864, Mrs Sunderland was one of a number of ladies who attended the stalls at a bazaar at Salem Methodist New Connexion Chapel, North Parade to raise funds to liquidate the debt on the Chapel. About £490 was owing, and £200 had been promised on condition that the balance would be raised during May 1864

Shibden United Methodist Chapel
Closed 1931

Shoebroad Farm Meeting House
In 1695, a group of Quakers moved their meetings from Pilkington Hall, Mankinholes to this new meeting house in Todmorden.

The burial ground was opened in 1699.

The meeting house has gone, but the burial ground remains

Shore General Baptist Church, Todmorden
Shore Green. Founded by Dan Taylor. Built in 1777.

The chapel was extended in 1853 and 1871.

Closed in the 1960s. The roof has collapsed. The Sunday school remains.

 
Pastors at the Church have included


 

There were offshoot Societies at Lineholme Baptist Church, Stansfield, Vale Baptist Church, Todmorden and Wellington Road Baptist Church, Todmorden.

See Lineholme Baptist Graveyard, Quaker Burial Ground, Shore and Shore General Baptist Church Graveyard, Todmorden

Shore General Baptist Church, Todmorden: Graveyard
The graveyard for Shore General Baptist Church, Todmorden stands on the hillside below the Church

Siddal Mission Room
Opened on Whitegate in August 1869.

The church was made of iron and became known by a variety of names – the iron church, the tin church or the tin tabernacle – and seated about 130.

After a time, the little church proved inadequate for the growing population, and was often filled to overflowing, and anniversary services had to be held in the schools.

The people were enthusiastic and a movement was started to press for a new church.

It was superseded by St Mark's Parish Church in 1915

Siddal Parish Church

Siddal Strict Baptist Church
Established in 1858. The meetings were held in premises provided by David Smith

Siddal Wesleyan Methodist Church
Oxford Lane. Opened in 18??

On 23rd December 1917, a Roll of Honour was unveiled for those serving in World War I.

The Church closed in 1985. Many members moved to Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Church, Halifax.

The Church was demolished in 19??

Simpson Road Church, Boothtown
See Mount Carmel Chapel

Sion
A Hebrew word often used to refer to Jerusalem. The form Zion is also used

Sion Congregational Church, Halifax
Wade Street. This was originally an Independent Chapel built for David Barraclough and a group who had been Wesleyan Methodists.

They moved to Stainland.

The Chapel was then used by the followers of Joanna Southcott. Their numbers declined around 1815.

A group from Square Chapel used the building for 2 years. In 1816, they bought the building.

A new chapel was built and opened on 13th February 1819. The cost of the building was over £6,000. It had seats for over 1000 and there was a schoolroom in the basement.

There was a burial ground attached to the Church.

The façade may be the work of R. D. Chantrell and is listed.

John Baldwin was a trustee.

In 1837, they transferred their little cause at Pellon to Pellon Lane Baptists.

In 1846, the Sion Sunday School was added. In 1866, the Jubilee Memorial Hall was added.

Around 1850, the organ was sold to the Providence Congregational Church, Stainland for £100.

David Livingstone gave a sermon and a lecture here in 1857.

The Church closed for burials in 1922.

The Church and the school closed in 1959.

The building was used by Scipio Brook Limited for a time.

Parts of the building have been incorporated into Halifax Bus Station.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

See Scipio Brook, Halifax Sunday School Union, John Moore, Park Congregational Church, Halifax, Sion Branch Congregational Sunday School, Bank Top and Stannary Congregational Church, Halifax

Sion Congregational Church, Halifax: Graveyard
The graveyard of Sion Congregational Church, Halifax.

When the Church and Burial Ground closed, the remains of 1725 people were transferred and reinterred at Stoney Royd Cemetery in a single vault, under the commemoration stone and stones which make up a series of steps [1963]

Sisters' Chapels
The Coley Chapel and Eastfield Chapel which are said to have been built by the Appleyard sisters. The Chapels are said to be one mile apart

Skircoat Green United Methodist Free Chapel
Recorded in 1896, when Rev W. Reed was Minister

Skircoat Green Wesleyan Church
On 10th January 1864, the boiler in the school room / Preaching Room beneath the Chapel exploded, injuring Mrs Ann Smith, wife of the chapel keeper.

Recorded in 1905

Slack Chapel
See Stone Slack Particular Baptist Church, Heptonstall

Snake Hill Meeting House, Rastrick
A Quaker meeting house built at Snake Hill around 1650.

This was rebuilt in 1736/7. This was (possibly) the oldest purpose-built, monthly Meeting House for the Quakers.

Amongst those who contributed to the building were Thomas Cooper who gave £4 2/- and Malon Cooper who gave £2 2/-

In 1868, they built and moved to Newlands Meeting House.

See Richard Hanson, Quaker Burial Ground, Rastrick and Captain Thomas Taylor

South Parade Methodist Chapel, Halifax

See David Barraclough, Bintliff Mite Box, John Crossley, John Greenwood and South Parade Methodist Chapel, Halifax: Graveyard

South Parade Methodist Chapel, Halifax: Graveyard
There was a large burial ground attached to South Parade Methodist Chapel.

In the 1870s, the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway demanded the compulsory purchase of the graveyard to enable expansion of the adjacent goods yard.

The chapel closed in 1880.

When the Burial Ground closed, the remains were transferred and reinterred at Stoney Royd Cemetery [April 1883]

Southend Chapel, Elland
Another name for the Elland Unitarian Chapel of 1785 to 1866

Southgate Chapel, Elland
Another name for the Elland Unitarian Chapel of 1785 to 1866

Southgate Methodist Chapel, Elland
In 1974, St Paul's Methodist Chapel, Elland was renamed.

There is a bronze tablet remembering those who died in World War I, and a memorial plaque remembering those who died in World War I and World War II.

A memorial plaque remembering those who served in World War I and World War II, was brought here from Providence Congregational Church, Stainland in 1992

Southowram Bank Mission Church
See St Michael's & All Angels' Church, Southowram Bank

Southowram Vicarage
The vicarage to St Anne's in the Grove Church, Southowram, stands next to the church in Church Lane.

See Vicars of Southowram

Southowram Wesleyan Chapel
Opened in 1806.

See Charles Farrar, Job Freeman and James Wadsworth

Southowram Wesleyan Chapel: Graveyard
The graveyard lies on the west side of Wesleyan Chapel, Southowram, Chapel Lane.

The Chapel closed in April 2005.

The graveyard is still there.

Sowden Chapel
Chapel in the south choir aisle at Hebden Bridge Parish Church built by Sutcliffe & Sutcliffe in memory of Rev George Sowden. It was consecrated on 7th May 1904 In 1929, the altar rails were a gift of the Hey family

Sowerby Bridge Baptist Church
Upper Fountain Street. The Baptist cause here was promoted by members of other churches – notably Rishworth – who came to live in the town. They first rented a room in Sowerby Bridge. In April 1878, they rented a room at the Town Hall.

In 1884, they bought land for a new Church, This was built in 1885.

It subsequently united with Hope Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge.

In 1892, the Church was free from debt.

In August 1892, 19 members formed a separate Church.

In 1900, new schools were built and alterations made to the Church at a cost of £1,000.

 
Pastors at the Church have included


 

Closed in 1967 and demolished for construction of a new church.

See Norland Baptist Church

Sowerby Bridge Cemetery
Cemetery Road. Opened in 1861 by the Sowerby Bridge Board of Health. It was designed by William Gay [1814-1893].

There were 2 chapels: one for Anglican burials and one for Nonconformists.

The Nonconformist Chapel is listed.

See Quaker Burial Ground, Sowerby Bridge

Sowerby Bridge Church Institute
Tuel Lane. Recorded in 1905

Sowerby Bridge Evangelical Methodist Free Church
Opened in 18??

Sowerby Bridge Independent Chapel
In October 1838, a chapel was discussed. The land was bought from Robert Edleston. He also gave £100 to the construction. The Chapel opened on 10th June 1840.

See Rishworth Independent Chapel

Sowerby Bridge Methodist Church
Stood below the junction of Wakefield Road and Bolton Brow. Built in 1806 as Sowerby Bridge's first Methodist chapel.

In 1780, the Wesleyan Methodists preached at Sterne Mills Their first chapel was built in Sowerby Bridge in 1801. This became a day school.

In 1831, the new larger Bolton Brow Methodist Chapel was built to replace it. It had a number of uses over the years – including school, cinema and dance hall – and was generally referred to as the Victoria Assembly Rooms. It was then used as the social club for the Sowerby Bridge carpet firm Homfray's.

When the firm discontinued this, they offered the empty building to Sowerby Bridge Council – which refused the gift.

In September 1958, the building was demolished

Sowerby Bridge Parish Church

Sowerby Bridge Primitive Methodist Chapel
Sowerby Street. Opened in 1839. In 1870, the congregation moved to the larger Sowerby New Road Primitive Methodist Chapel

Sowerby Bridge Vicarage
The residence of the incumbent of Sowerby Bridge.

In 1881, it was listed with Claremont Street and Shepherd Villa, Warley.

Until around 1905, it stood on Wood Nook Lane / Beech Road, Sowerby.

In 19??, a new Vicarage was built on Park Road and the old building became the Woodnook Inn.

See Vicars of Sowerby Bridge

Sowerby Bridge Wesleyan Mission Chapel
Foundry Street. Built in 18??.

 
Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

Details of the organ in the Chapel can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

It is now Sowerby Bridge Youth & Community Centre

Sowerby Chapel
See St Peter's Church, Sowerby

Sowerby Green Congregational Chapel: Graveyard
Sowerby Green Congregational Chapel was demolished in summer 1980.

The graveyard and gates remain

Sowerby Green Congregational Church
Aka Old Green Congregational Church, Sowerby, Sowerby Congregational Church.

Originating in 1645, this is said to have been the oldest surviving Congregational community in Yorkshire. The Church was started by a group of dissenters from St Peter's Church.

The church opened in 1721.

The worshippers provided their own straw, rugs or mats for comfort. The seating was on benches. The single pew was occupied by Mr Lea.

In time, some left to establish the Friends' Meeting House in Quarry Hill, others established Steep Lane Baptist Chapel, and Rooley Lane Methodists and Providence Methodist Church.

The building became too small and a Gothic church was rebuilt by John Hogg at a cost of £2,300.

The foundation stone was laid 4th August 1860. The new church opened on 11th September 1861.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

The organ was installed in 18??, replacing the earlier orchestra of bassoon, cello, clarinet and violin.

In 1960, the neighbouring manse, where the minister lived, was sold.

In 1964, the church merged with Luddendenfoot Congregational Church.

The Church closed in 197?.

It was demolished in summer 1980.

The graveyard is still there.

See Henry Root

Sowerby Independent Chapel
Foundation stone laid 4th August 1860

Sowerby New Road Primitive Methodist Chapel
Designed by Samuel Uttley. Built at a cost of £3,000.

The corner stone was laid on 15th May 1869 by Mr Cunliffe of Sowerby Bridge and Haslingden.

It accommodated 600 worshippers. A schoolroom was a part of the design.

The congregation moved here from Sowerby Bridge Primitive Methodist Chapel, Opened on 14th April 1870.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

Closed in 1958.

The building was demolished and a telephone exchange stands on the site

See John Robinson

Sowerby Old Road Quaker Chapel
Sowerby Street

Sowerby Parish Church

Sowerby Parish Church: Apse
The apse of St Peter's Church, Sowerby is semicircular.

Giuseppe Cortese completed plasterwork in the apse and the chancel in 1766.

The central Venetian window in the apse is flanked by relief figures of Moses and Christ and dominated by the Royal Arms of George III.

A brass plate records

To the Glory of God, and in memory of Robert Stansfeld of Field House, who died August 2nd 1855, aged 83 years; and Lydia his wife, who died July 31st 1816, aged 36 years.
This window is placed here AD 1862

Rev Alexander Louis Wellington Bean placed 2 mosaics in the apse in memory of his wife Ellen Susanna

The organ stands to the north of the apse

Sowerby Parish Church: Bells
In the first subscription list for Sowerby Church, George Stansfeld gave £200 – specifically for the bells.

The 8 bells in the Church were made by William Chapman of London [1781]. They were recast to celebrate the coronation of Elizabeth II by John Taylor & Company of Whitechapel, London, at their foundry in Loughborough [1954].

The bells are inscribed

This is said to be the first peal of 8 bells to be hung in Yorkshire.

They were re-cast in 1954 to celebrate the coronation of Elizabeth II.

In 1967, Muriel, widow of George Reginald Stansfeld, restored the belfry at the Church

See William Sottenstall

Sowerby Parish Church: Crimea Memorial
In 1856, a marble tablet, by Mr Fisher of York, in memory of the men of Sowerby who died during the Crimean War, was placed in Sowerby Parish Church

Sowerby Parish Church: Fonts
There are 2 fonts in St Peter's Church, Sowerby:

Sowerby Parish Church: Gallery
The gallery St Peter's Church, Sowerby is horse-shoe-shaped. It is reached via the stairs in the tower

Sowerby Parish Church: Organ
The organ in St Peter's Church, Sowerby stands north of the apse.

There was an organ by Donaldson of York [1791].

In May 1861, John Rawson presented a new organ by Conacher & Company of Huddersfield, in memory of William Priestley.

The present organ is by J. J. Binns and is dated 1914 Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register

Sowerby Parish Church: Other Memorials
In addition to the war memorials, there are other memorials in St Peter's Church, Sowerby

Sowerby Parish Church: Pulpit
The pulpit of St Peter's Church, Sowerby stands at the south side of the entrance to the chancel

Sowerby Parish Church: War Memorials
There are several memorials in St Peter's Church, Sowerby to those of the chapelry who served and died in wars

See Other memorials

Sowerby Parish Church: Windows
Beside those in the apse, there are several notable stained glass windows in St Peter's Church, Sowerby.

The numbering here is that used in the booklet produced by the Church

  • Window #1: on the left as your enter the South Door

  • Window #2: in the south aisle, first on your right

  • Window #3: The Henrietta Rawson memorial window

  • Window #4: The Stansfield Memorial window to the memory of Colonel Robert Stansfield and his wife, Hannah Lætitia

  • Window #5:

  • Window #6:

  • Window #7:

  • Window #8:

  • Window #9:

  • Window #10:

  • Window #11: The East Window in the Apse

  • Window #12:

  • Window #13:

  • Window #14:

  • Window #15:

  • Window #16:

  • Window #17:

  • Window #18: He is risen, He is not here

  • Window #19:

  • Window #20:

Sowerby United Reformed Church
Opened in 18??.

Closed in the 1960s. Demolished in the 1970s

Sowerby Vicarage
Butterworth Lane.

In 1722, Elkanah Horton gave Butterworth Lane Ends to Sowerby Church.

It became the Vicarage for St Peter's Church, Sowerby.

Dated

Rebuilt by R. Webster 1790

There is an architect's drawing dated 1827 by John Oates.

The vicarage was sold in 1965.

It is now known as The Glebe, Sowerby.

See Tillotson portrait, Vicarage Farm, Sowerby and Vicars of Sowerby

Sowood Wesleyan Methodist Church
Opened in 18??.

The church closed around 1894. It is now a private house.

There was a memorial remembering those who served in World War I. This was moved to Bethesda Methodist Church, Elland when the church closed

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

Spiritualist Hall, Todmorden
Recorded in 1905 at Dale Street.

See Spiritualism and Todmorden Spiritualists' Temple

Spiritualist Progressive Lyceum, Sowerby Bridge
Hollins Lane.

The Sowerby Bridge society was founded by Edward Wood in 1869, at his home Rose Mount, Sowerby Bridge.

They later moved to the home of William Robinson at Causeway Head.

Early meetings were held at Warley Edge, Brearley, Pellon, and Wharf Street, Sowerby Bridge.

The Lyceum was built in 1874. It opened on Sunday, 7th June 1874.

The first Trustees were

  • Henry Broadbent [the first Secretary]

  • T. Gaukroger

  • J. Harwood

  • J. Lord

  • William Robinson

  • Joseph Sutcliffe

  • T. Thorpe [Treasurer]

  • H. Whittaker [Conductor]

Recorded in June 1896, when Anniversary Services were held.

See William Greenwood, Ernest Holroyd, Spiritualism and Abbey Durio Wilson

Spiritualists' Lyceum, Brighouse
Martin Street. Recorded in 1900.

See National Spiritualist Church, Brighouse and Spiritualism

Spiritualists' Lyceum, Greetland
Green Lane. Recorded in 1901.

See Spiritualism

Springside Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Stansfield
Opened by a group who left Rodwell End Meeting House, Stansfield.

On 26th July 1873, the corner-stone was laid. On 15th October 1874, the new Chapel opened. The cost was over £3,000.

The church was renovated in 1897. A new organ built by Alfred Kirkland was opened on 25th September 1897.

The chapel closed in 1954. The stained glass window was moved to Mankinholes Chapel

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

Square Church Pleasant Sunday Afternoon Society
Halifax. A Pleasant Sunday Afternoon group at Square Congregational Church

Square Congregational Church, Halifax
Victorian church built at The Square in 14th-century Gothic style designed by Joseph James for Sir Francis Crossley and the Crossley family. Opened on 15th July 1857.

See Saul Blagborough, Lawson Saville, Square Church Brotherhood Forward Movement, Square Church Pleasant Sunday Afternoon Society, Square Church Sisterhood Committee, Square Literary & Debating Society, Square Mutual Improvement Society and Square Young Men's Society

Square Independent Chapel, Halifax
The red brick chapel was built at The Square by Thomas Bradley and James Kershaw for Titus Knight. This was the first Independent congregation in Halifax. The Chapel opened on 24th May 1772.

Contributor Lesley Abernethy notes that

The IGI has baptisms for the Chapel dating back to 1763, and the National Directory of Parish Registers says its registers go back to 1760.

See Cornelius Ashworth, Crossley family graves, Abel Wadsworth Dean, Gaol Lane, Range Bank Day School, Halifax, Square Chapel Day School, Halifax, Square Chapel, Halifax, Square Independent Chapel: Graveyard and Square Chapel Sunday School, Halifax

Square Independent Chapel, Halifax: Graveyard
The graveyard of Square Independent Chapel, Halifax lies on the east side of the building * General * Key

Stafford Square Wesleyan Church, Halifax
Huddersfield Road.

The stone laying ceremony took place on 29th June 1912

The Church and Sunday school opened on 3rd March 1913. The cost was £3,500.

It was demolished in the 1960s. St Andrew's Methodist Church was built on the site

Stainland & Holywell Green United Reformed Church
See Holywell Green United Reformed Church

Stainland & Outlane, Parish of
See Elland Chapelry, Outlane and St Mary Magdalene Church, Outlane

Stainland Independent Chapel
Built in 1814 by a group who had left Stainland Independent Church after there had been a disagreement over the reading of prayers

Stainland Independent Church
Aka Stainland Providence Independent Chapel. A name given to the church at Stainland.

Because it was the only place of worship in the area, the church was shared by Anglicans and Nonconformists – Wesleyans and Independents – for their Sunday services.

In 1812, the Anglicans insisted that their service be used, and a split followed. The Independents left to build Providence Congregational Chapel [1814].

In 1838, the Anglicans took full control of the church, and the present St Andrew's Church was built on the same site in 1839. The Wesleyans left to build Stainland Wesleyan Chapel.

See Stainland Independent Church: Graveyard

Stainland Independent Church: Graveyard
The burial ground for Stainland Independent Church

Stainland Road Methodist Chapel, West Vale
Brow Bridge. Aka West Vale Methodist Chapel.

On 15th April 1870, 2 corner-stones were laid – by William Handley of Rochdale and Joseph Handley of Rochdale – for a new Chapel. The new Chapel was to cost £1,000. The design was by Samuel Uttley.

The roof was damaged by a fire at neighbouring mills on 21st December 1893.

Closed in 1946.

It was demolished in 1952

The sale of the Chapel raised £100 for the freehold site, £205 for the stone, £250 for 4,200 blue slates, and £4 for the glass vestry screens. Rev H. Stratton bought the doors and partition for alterations being made to a Stainland Methodist Chapel

The Sam Robinson Hoyle Memorial Garden now stands on the site

Stainland Vicarage
Stainland Road. The vicarage for St Andrew's Church, Stainland.

The tram service, which began in 1921, ran as far as the café by the vicarage.

See Vicars of Stainland

Stainland Wesleyan Chapel
Built by a group of Wesleyan Methodists who left the shared chapel which became St Andrew's Church, Stainland. Eli Walker laid the foundation stone. The Wesleyan chapel opened on 27th March 1840. It cost £2,010 5/11d to build.

It accommodated around 540 worshippers [1845].

The Sunday School next door accommodated 400 scholars. The first entry in the school register was in 1835.

In 1887, a church magazine was published.

In the 1890s, a church organ fund was started.

[?] It was reopened in March 1900.

The first marriage was conducted in 1903.

It thrived until the 1950s when, despite efforts to reinvigorate it and to attract people from the newly-built housing estate which surrounded it, numbers began to diminish and continued to decline until 1963 when the Chapel closed.

The building was sold to a private buyer and demolished. Some of the stone from it was used to build the two bungalows which now occupy the site. The pulpit went to the Derby Bar, Rishworth.

Services continued in the Sunday School until 1968 when it closed. Rev R. C. Bedford gave the final service.

In 1972, the Church and the school were demolished.

The chapel had a large graveyard which, although closed, still exists under the care of the local authority.

See Croft House, Stainland, Resting Where No Shadows Fall and William Smith

Stainland Wesleyan Chapel: Graveyard
Stainland Wesleyan Chapel had a large graveyard which, although closed, still exists under the care of the local authority.

See Resting Where No Shadows Fall and Stainland Wesleyan Graveyard: MIs

Standeven's Chapel
Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Church, Halifax was popularly known as Standeven's Chapel after 1922 when J. W. Standeven of Skipton agreed to meet the cost of the new Church in memory of his mother Charlotte who had been a member of the Church

Stannary Congregational Church, Halifax
Stannary Street / Alma Street. Financed and built by Thomas Smith Scarborough and his family.

The church was establish on account of a dispute over Temperance amongst members of Sion Congregational Church. Opened in 1869 [?].

On 13th July 1870, a tea and public meeting was held to celebrate the opening of the new school in connection with the Church.

Scarborough was deacon until 1884

On 16th September 1916, the Roll of Honour was unveiled at the Church.

In 1930, the Halifax Choir Festival was held here.

The Church closed in 1939/1940.

 
Incumbents and Curates at the Church have included


 

See James Malcolm Bowman and Richard Edwin Feather

Stansfield Chapel
An early Independent group which met at the Great House, Stansfield.

See Bent Head Chapel, Chapel House, Stansfield and Myrtle Grove Independent Chapel, Eastwood

The Stations of the Cross, Greetland
14 panels at St Thomas's Church, Greetland created by local potter Pat Kaye, to mark the 125th anniversary of the church. The work was dedicated on 3rd July 1988. The panels, ranging in size from 1 ft square to 6 ft tall. The work was commissioned by Mrs Shirley Garnett, whose husband, Bill, a dentist, was killed in the M6 mini-bus crash at Lune Bridge in September 1987

Steep Lane Baptist Church, Sowerby
The first Church was built in 1751.

See Mr Standeven, Steep Lane Baptist Church, Sowerby: Graveyard and Steep Lane, Manse

Steep Lane Baptist Church, Sowerby: Graveyard
The graveyard for Steep Lane Baptist Church, Sowerby

Steep Lane, Manse
The manse for Steep Lane Baptist Church, Sowerby

Stone Chair Tabernacle
Bill Lane, Shelf. Opened around 1887 – during the ministry of Rev R. Collinson – as a branch of Bethel Methodist Chapel, Shelf. The chapel occupied 2 cottages which had been lent by Henry Bottomley

It closed in the 1970s

Stone Slack Particular Baptist Church, Heptonstall
Aka Slack Chapel, Slack Top Chapel.

In 1711, Thomas Greenwood bought a barn and converted it for use as a Baptist Church. It had a joint minister with Rodwell End Chapel.

 
Pastors at the Church have included


 

By 1806, it had fallen into disuse and a group from Birchcliffe Chapel held their meetings here before Mount Zion Baptist Church, Heptonstall Slack was built

Stones Methodist Church, Ripponden: Graveyard
The graveyard for Stones Methodist Church, Ripponden.

When the old Church of 1804 fell into disrepair, a new building was erected alongside the old Church in 1902. The old Church was then demolished and the land was incorporated into the graveyard

Stones Wesleyan Methodist Church, Ripponden
Rochdale Road. Built in 1803 and opened in 1804.

It accommodated 350 worshippers [1845].

A Sunday school was established in 1815.

In 1816, two break-away groups left the Church. One went to establish Lighthazels United Methodist Chapel, Ripponden, the other established Ebenezer Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Soyland.

The old Church fell into disrepair and the present building was erected alongside the old Church in 1902. The old Church was then demolished and the land was incorporated into the graveyard.

The building was refurbished in 2004.

Details of the organ in the Church can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

The memorial plaque remembering those who served in World War I. was brought here from Triangle Methodist Chapel.

See Edward Navey's Charity and Stones Wesleyan Chapel School, Ripponden

Stoney Royd Cemetery
Aka Halifax Corporation Cemetery. The Borough cemetery built by Halifax Corporation on the site of Stoney Royd House.

It opened in 1863.

See Marshall Hunsworth, Quarmby & Mills, William Riley and South Parade Methodist Chapel, Halifax: Graveyard

Stott's Mission, Brighouse
Bethel Street. The Salvation Army held their meetings here before moving to the Salvation Army Citadel, Brighouse

Summit Primitive Methodist Chapel
Calderbrook. Opened in 1866.

 
Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

Summit Wesleyan Methodist Temple
Calderbrook. Opened in 1839. It was enlarged in 1868. It was rebuilt in 1871

Sutcliffe Street Chapel, Pellon


Question: Can anyone tell me anything about this Chapel?

 

Swamp Chapel, Queensbury
See West End Methodist Chapel, Queensbury


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© Malcolm Bull 2014 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 18:02 on 7th December 2014 / c109_s / 296