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Churches & Chapels

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Machpelah House, Hebden Bridge
Having seen many overcrowded public cemeteries, Dr John Fawcett bought the land on which Machpelah House was built and gave it the name Machpelah as it was intended to be Fawcett's burial place.

His wife was buried at Machpelah, but she was later disinterred.

An increase in buildings and population in the immediate neighbourhood spoilt Dr Fawcett's plans

Manchester Parish Church
The Parish Church in Manchester is the Cathedral & Collegiate Church of St Mary, St Denys & St George in Manchester

Mankinholes Quaker Meeting House

Mankinholes Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Langfield. The original Methodist chapel was built in 1814 to serve the Langfield, Mankinholes and Lumbutts communities. A Sunday School was built by subscription in 1833.

In 1837, there was a split and the United Free Methodists set up their own chapel in Lumbutts. The chapel at Mankinholes continued.

It accommodated around 280 worshippers [1845].

It was enlarged in 1870 and almost entirely re-built in 1911.

The new Chapel was opened on 27th January 1912 by Mrs J. J. Tatham of Stoodley Lodge.

In 1954, the stained glass from Springside Methodist Church was installed at Mankinholes.

The last service was held on the 1st July 1979. The chapel was closed in 1979 after extensive dry rot and a structural defect were found, and it was demolished soon after. Some of the stained glass was moved to Lumbutts Methodist Chapel

The plans for the chapel were borrowed for Blackshawhead Wesleyan Methodist Chapel which was built in the following year.

A Sunday school had been built alongside the chapel in 1833. In the 1980s, this was converted into a house. The burial ground is still there.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

See Mankinholes Methodist Chapel War Memorials

Mankinholes Wesleyan Methodist Chapel: Graveyard
Mankinholes Wesleyan Methodist Chapel closed and was converted into a house in the 1980s.

The burial ground remains.

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #2

The Manse, Northowram
When he served at Northowram, Heywood lived in his own property at Northowram House.

During the ministry of Rev Robert Hesketh in 1750, Nathaniel Priestley gave land and stone to construct The Manse on Towngate.

This was the vicarage for Heywood's Chapel, Northowram and was built on land at Laithe Croft, Northowram.

The cost of the new building was £208 11/8d.

In 1772, Hesketh's School was built adjoining The Manse.

Next to The Manse stands a delapidated barn building which is said to have been used as stables by Heywood

Marshaw Bridge Church

Mediæval Churches
There are a few mediæval churches in the district:

Meeting house
A place where the services of the Society of Friends are held.

The name might also be used by other Nonconformist groups.

See Friends Meeting House, Halifax, Friends Meeting House, Brighouse, Friends Meeting House, Todmorden, Newlands Meeting House, Brighouse, Rodwell End Meeting House, Stansfield, Shoebroad Farm Meeting House and Snake Hill Meeting House, Brighouse

Methodist Free Church, Boothtown
See Boothtown United Methodist Chapel

Miall Street Methodist Church, Halifax
Opened in 18??

Middle Dean Street United Methodist Chapel
West Vale. Opened July 1865.

It was popularly known as Middle Diddle.

 
Subsequent Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

The last service was held in August 1972. The Chapel closed and the congregation merged with Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Elland – See St Paul's Methodist Chapel, Elland.

The building was derelict for a time. Proposals for use of the building included a theatre, offices, and West Vale Squash Club [2008].

It has been converted into apartments.

See Middle Dean Street Chapel Roll of Honour and Middle Dean Street Sunday School

Midgley & Luddenden Valley Methodist Church
High Street.

Uses the building which was formerly St James's United Methodist Free Church, Luddenden

Midgley Methodist Chapel
See Providence Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Midgley

Military Graves
In addition to the men and women who are remembered on local war memorials, many other serviceman and women have been buried and remembered in individual graves in churchyards and cemeteries in the district.

Images of some of these are collected here

Mill Bank Wesleyan
The graveyard for Mill Bank Wesleyan Methodist Chapel.

The following people, and/or members of their family, were buried and/or have memorials here:


  • To be completed
 

Mill Bank Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
A Chapel was built here in 1817.

The foundation stone for a new Chapel was laid on 2nd July 1864 by Mr D. Clay. The new Chapel opened on 9th June 1865. It cost £1,250.

 
Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

It closed in 1968.

The Sunday school stands next door.

Both the Chapel and the school are now private dwellings.

There is a small graveyard nearby.

See Mill Bank Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Mill Bank Wesleyan Methodist Graveyard and Triangle Mission Room

Mill Bank Wesleyan Methodist Graveyard
The burial ground for Mill Bank Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #4

Million Pound Church

Millwood Particular Baptist Church, Stansfield
Founded in 1807 by a group from the Inghamite church at Harley Wood. They and their Minister were expelled for holding
Believer's baptism

They began holding meetings at the disused Rodhill End Chapel, then Rehoboth Baptist Church, Stansfield before moving to Millwood.

It accommodated 300 worshippers [1845].

 
Pastors at the Church have included


 

In 1877, the Church moved to the new Roomfield Baptist Church, Todmorden

Minster Church of Saint John the Baptist, Halifax

Mixenden Independent Chapel
Aka Mixenden Old Chapel, Mixenden Congregational Chapel.

Around 1688, the Independent congregation – and Rev Matthew Smith – built their own chapel on the west side of Mixenden. This stood above the site of the modern reservoir and plantation.

In 1717, Rev Matthew Smith built a new chapel on his own land at Moor End, Pellon. This measured 36 ft by 30 ft.

The new chapel became Moor End Congregational Church.

The old Mixenden Chapel was converted into 2 cottages.

A datestone recorded that the Chapel was built in 1717, rebuilt in 1810 [?] and enlarged in 1856 [?].

It was demolished in the early 1900s for the gathering grounds for Mixenden Reservoir.

See Benjamin Patchett

Moor End Congregational Church, Pellon
Around 1688, the Independent congregation built their own Chapel on the west side of Mixenden.

In 1717, Rev Matthew Smith built a new Church on his own land at Moor End, Pellon.

See Moor End Congregational Church, Pellon Graveyard

Moor End Congregational Church, Pellon: Graveyard
The graveyard of Moor End Congregational Church, Pellon

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #1

Moor End United Reformed Church, Pellon
In 1972, Moor End Congregational Church became Moor End United Reformed Church.

See Moor End Congregational Church, Pellon Graveyard

Mount Carmel Primitive Methodist Chapel, Boothtown
Simpson Street / Claremount Road.

Built in 1865 by the Primitive Methodists.

It ceased to be used by the Methodists in 1951.

In 1954, the Serbian Orthodox community bought the building and it became the Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity

Mount Olivet Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge
Charlestown.

In 1836, a group of Baptists worshipped in a cottage at Spa Hall. As numbers grew, they hired rooms in a mill.

In 1842, the congregation was increased by worshippers from Mount Zion Baptist Church, Heptonstall Slack. Meetings were first held in a cottage above Eastwood.

On 24th June 1846, the Mount Olivet Church opened above Underbank Hall. The cost of construction was £1,600. The debt was cleared in 1896.

 
Pastors at the Church have included


 

There were concerns about the location of the Church, as it was felt that the hill site was a disadvantage. In 1902, a committee was appointed to consider a site in the valley.

In 1909, it was superseded by the new Naze Bottom Baptist Church. The closing services were held on 7th March 1909. For some years after 1909, the old Church was retained for anniversary services only

The Church was demolished in the 1940s.

The burial ground remains

Mount Olivet Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge: Graveyard
The burial ground for Mount Olivet Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #2

Mount Olivet Baptist Church, Todmorden

Mount Olivet Church, Aked's Road
Halifax.

It was established in 1942 as a self-governing Pentecostal church.

In August 1957, they bought and moved into the premises of the Second Church of Christ Scientist, Aked's Road.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

Mount Pellon, Parish of
The parish for Christ Church, Pellon was formed in 1854

Mount Pleasant Methodist Church, Wainstalls
Mount Pleasant, Saltonstall Lane.

Aka Wainstalls Mount Pleasant Methodist Church and Wainstalls Wesleyan Reformed Chapel.

Built by subscription. Opened on 10th March 1857. It is inscribed

Mount Pleasant Wesleyan Reformed Chapel, built by subscription 1857

It closed in 19??.

It is now a private house, known as Chapel House.

The Sunday School building stands next door.

The graveyard is still there – even though the sign is spelt incorrectly.

See Mount Pleasant Wesleyans Cricket Club and Wesleyan Reformers

Mount Pleasant Methodist Church, Wainstalls: Graveyard
The graveyard for Mount Pleasant Methodist Church, Wainstalls stands just south of the Church.

It is still in use even though the sign is spelt incorrectly.

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #1

See Halifax and Us

Mount Pleasant Wesleyan Chapel, Norland
Norland Town Road.

Built by subscription in 1819. Joseph Boothroyd was instrumental in establishing the Chapel.

This was the first place of worship in Norland.

Recorded in 1845 and 1905.

It accommodated around 300 worshippers [1845].

Around 1850, it became a Methodist Free Church – see Samuel Hoyle.

It was later known as Norland United Methodist Church.

The Chapel closed in the 1960s.

It is now a private house.

The graveyard is still open for burials.

See Zachariah Pickles

Mount Pleasant Wesleyan Chapel, Norland: Graveyard
The graveyard of Mount Pleasant Wesleyan Chapel, Norland is still open for burials, although the Chapel closed in the 1960s

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #2

Mount Pleasant Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Hipperholme
Another name for Bramley Lane Church

Mount Sion Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Holmfield

See Upper Brockholes Methodist Chapel

Mount Tabor Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Mount Tabor Road. Built in 1820 and extended in 1824. The Sunday School was built next door in 1836.

It accommodated 600 worshippers [1845].

In 1860, the Chapel was refurbished: the porch was added, and a new harmonium – by Alexandre of Paris – was installed.

The foundation stone for a larger and more convenient Sunday School was laid in 1871.

The church – gallery fronts, pews, pulpit and organ loft – were refurbished around 1875.

Details of the organ in the Chapel can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

In 1905, the Burial Ground here was listed as one of the town's cemeteries.

See Mount Tabor Wesleyan Methodist Roll of Honour

Mount Tabor Wesleyan Methodist Chapel: Graveyard
In 1905, the burial ground for Mount Tabor Wesleyan Methodist Chapel was listed as one of the town's cemeteries

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #1

Mount Zion Baptist Church, Heptonstall Slack
In 1806, a group of 37 Baptists left Birchcliffe Baptist Church. They held their first meetings in the disused Particular Baptist Church at Stone Slack.

In 1808, the new Mount Zion chapel was erected.

See Heptonstall Slack Baptist Cemetery, Mount Olivet Baptist Church, Charlestown, Mount Zion Baptist Memorial, Heptonstall and Slack Baptist Sunday School

Mount Zion Chapel, Lightcliffe
Bramley Lane. The church was built in 1823 by the Primitive Methodists.

There is an inscription on the front of the building

MOUNT ZION 1823

The church did not prosper and the Methodists sold it to John Holland and Samuel Hodgson and the Congregationalists in October 1826.

It became Bramley Lane Congregational Church in 1830.

 
Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

On 22nd January 1862, the marriage of Elizabeth, daughter of David Abercrombie, to John Holdsworth was the first marriage at the Chapel. The couple were presented with a Bible to commemorate the event.

In 1870, it was decided to build a larger church nearby, many wealthy families having moved into the area. The family of Sir Titus Salt were amongst the main contributors.

From 1850, Mount Zion Voluntary School was held here.

The new Lightcliffe Congregational Church opened on 18th October 1871.

The old church was used as a Sunday School [until 1892].

It has since been used as a small business premises.

See John Holland, Lightcliffe Congregational Church Young Men's Society and Mount Zion Chapel, Lightcliffe Graveyard

Mount Zion Chapel, Lightcliffe: Graveyard
The burial ground for Mount Zion Chapel, Lightcliffe was built near the junction of Bramley Lane and Syke Lane

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #4

Mount Zion Methodist Chapel, Ogden
Per Lane.

The chapel and the adjoining chapel-keeper's cottage were built in 1773.

See Luke Clayton and Mount Zion Methodist Chapel, Ogden Graveyard

Mount Zion Methodist Chapel, Ogden: Graveyard
The graveyard of Mount Zion Methodist Chapel, Ogden.

See Halifax and Us

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #1

Mount Zion Primitive Methodist Chapel, Norland
New Longley. After the arrival of Rev Thomas Holliday in 1821, services were held in a number of locations – the home of Isaac Holroyd, Goose Nest Farm, Norland [1821], Waterloo Street, Sowerby Bridge [1821], and the home of John Robinson in Sowerby Bridge [1826] - before this Chapel was built in 1863-1864 on land given by Eli Hitchen.

The Chapel was extended in 1874.

An organ by Conacher was installed in 1908. Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register. The organ was subsequently acquired by George Barnard of Upper Wat Ing, Norland,

The Chapel closed in 1971.

It is now a private residence

See Mount Zion Primitive Methodist Band of Hope, Norland and Mount Zion Primitive Methodist Chapel, Norland Graveyard

Mount Zion Primitive Methodist Chapel, Norland: Graveyard
The graveyard of Mount Zion Primitive Methodist Chapel, Norland.

The Chapel is now a private house.

The Graveyard is still accessible.

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #1

Mount Zion Primitive Methodist Church, Mytholmroyd
Midgley Road. Built in 1887/8 by the Methodists from Mytholmroyd Primitive Methodist Chapel.

Ted Hughes was born at 1 Aspinall Street opposite the church, and the church is mentioned in his poetry.

The church closed in August 1960, because of dry rot, and the society joined with the Wesleyan chapel in Scout Road to become Mytholmroyd Methodist Church.

The Church was demolished in 1970, and flats now stand on the site.

See Mount Zion Methodist Church, Mytholmroyd War Memorial

Mount Zion Primitive Methodist Church, Sowerby
Opened in 18??

Mount Zion United Free Methodist Church, Cornholme
Burnley Road.

Built with the support of the Wilson family.

The foundation stone was laid on 17th May 1853.

On 24th February 1854, the Church was almost blown down in a gale.

On 10th March 1867, the vestry and orchestra were destroyed by fire.

Enlarged in 1889. It was refurbished in 1898.

The Sunday school was built in 1892. This operated as a day school and Sunday school. This was superseded by Cornholme School in 1899.

The church closed in 1968. Services continued in the school building until this became unsafe and closed in 1985.

The Church was demolished in 1982. The building is derelict with only the remains of the walls standing.

The graveyard is still there.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

See Mount Zion Methodist Church, Cornholme War Memorial, Mount Zion Methodist Church, Cornholme Graveyard and Jared Priestley

Mount Zion United Free Methodist Church, Cornholme: Graveyard
Burnley Road. The graveyard for Mount Zion Methodist Church, Cornholme

Mountain Wesleyan Church
Temperance Place

Municipal Cemetery, Whitworth: Graveyard
The Cemetery lies outside Calderdale, but, being only 10 miles from Todmorden, it is/was used by many local people, particularly those from Walsden

The following people, and/or members of their family, were buried and/or have memorials here:


  • To be completed
 

Myrtle Grove Independent Chapel, Eastwood
Opened in summer 1807 by the Congregationalists from Bent Head Chapel. It accommodated 500 worshippers.

In 1817, the chapel was inactive on account of disputes between the pastors and the congregation.

In 1826, a house for the minister was built near the Station House Hotel.

In March 1838, it was registered for the solemnisation of marriages.

In 1839, when the Manchester & Leeds Railway was constructed, the Church was bought for use as the Station House. Eastwood Railway station was built on the site.

 
Subsequent Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

A new chapel – Eastwood Congregational Church – opened in the summer of 1840.

See Captain William Eden and Edmund Lord

Mytholm Church, Hebden Bridge
See St James's Church, Hebden Bridge

Mytholmroyd, Luddendenfoot & District Free Church
Opened in 18??

Mytholmroyd Methodist Church
Mytholmroyd Wesleyan Methodist Church is recorded in 1896, when Rev H. Morrison was Minister.

Mytholmroyd Methodist Church was established in 1960 when Mount Zion Methodist Chapel, Mytholmroyd merged with Scout Road Methodists.

See Mytholmroyd Historical Society, Mytholmroyd Methodist Sunday School, Mytholmroyd Wesleyan Methodist Church Graveyard, Mytholmroyd Wesleyan Methodist Sunday School War Memorial and Mytholmroyd Wesleyan Methodist War Memorial

Mytholmroyd Primitive Methodist Chapel
The Methodists formerly met in a cottage on Midgley Road. The chapel and Sunday school were built in 1837.

In 1888, they built the Mount Zion Chapel.

 
Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

Mytholmroyd Wesleyan Methodist Church: Graveyard
The graveyard for Mytholmroyd Wesleyan Methodist Church.

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #1


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 18:24 on 17th October 2017 / c109_m / 59