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Eastfield Chapel, Lightcliffe
Aka East Wood Chapel, Eastfields Chapel, Estfeld Chapel, and Lightcliffe Old Chapel.

In 1529, the original chapel was built on land on the Royds Hall estate given by the Rookes family – this was the same year as Coley Chapel – as a chapel of ease, and was endowed in 1536.

See Appleyard sisters, Edmund ffarebanke and Sisters' House.

Those who contributed towards the Chapel included Richard Cliffe, Edmund Fairbanks, Edward Hoyle, James Thorpe, and John Thorpe.

The Chapel suffered during the Reformation, and was repaired in 1598.

Heywood writes


At Lightcliffe, there has been a great number of wretched drunken preachers in my time, as any I have known in any one place

 

A stone in the belfry was inscribed


Deo et Sancto Matthæo
Apostolo Evangelistæ
Martyri Sacra
A. O. MDCXXIX

The Curate's House stood near the south-west corner of the Chapel and was moved to Till Carr Lane in 1865.

In 1680, Dr Richard Sterne issued a license which allowed baptisms and burials to take place at the chapel.

In 1740, Rev John Grimshaw married Mary Cockroft here.

In 1774, it was rebuilt, by William Mallinson and William Walker, a little further along Wakefield Road and was known as Lightcliffe Old Church.

A list of some of the Vicars of Lightcliffe is given in a separate Foldout

 
Churchwardens here have included


 

See Eastfield Chapel, Lightcliffe Graveyard

Eastfield Chapel, Lightcliffe: Graveyard
The graveyard of Eastfield Chapel, Lightcliffe.

In 1680, Dr Richard Sterne issued a license which allowed baptisms and burials to take place at the chapel.

Early gravestones – such as one for a man called Batley dated 15th February 1665 and one for Esther, wife of Robert Hanson of Hove Edge, dated June 1674 - suggest that burials took place before that date

Eastwood Congregational Church
Cockden, Todmorden.

A letter heading relating to the Church includes the caption Founded AD 1693

The Church was built in 1840 to replace the earlier Myrtle Grove Church of 1807.

It accommodated around 750 worshippers [1845].

In 1868, a memorial tablet to Rev Amos Blackburn was placed at the east end of the Church.

In 1877, an organ was installed, replacing the 12-piece volunteer orchestra.

In 1885, the Church interior was refurbished with new seats and gallery front. The figures pitch-pine panels in the gallery and the pulpit were specially selected by Stephen Halstead from Liverpool merchants.

The refurbished Church opened in January 1886.

In 1887, the first choir began.

The graveyard was flooded and graves washed away in floods on 19th November 1890.

During World War I, there was friction when the majority of the congregation who supported the war, ostracised the minority pacifist group.

The Church closed in 1962.

It was demolished shortly afterwards. A bungalow stands on the site. The graveyard is still there.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

Eastwood Congregational Church: Graveyard
Cockden, Todmorden.

The graveyard of Eastwood Congregational Church was flooded and graves washed away in floods on 19th November 1890.

The Church closed in 1962 and was demolished shortly afterwards. A bungalow stands on the site. The graveyard is still there.

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #2

Eastwood Presbyterian Chapel, Stansfield
In her will of 1720, Mary Hutton of Pudsey bequeathed the rents from her properties in the Bradford district. The money was to be used to support 7 Presbyterian and Congregational Churches, one of which was
Eastwood Chapel in the township of Stansfield

On 19th July 1877, a new organ was inaugurated. It cost £380.

The Chapel was demolished in 18??. Eastwood Station was built on the site

See Thomas Farrar

Ebenezer
A Hebrew word meaning stone of help which was the name of the site of a battle between the Israelites and the Philistines

Ebenezer Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge
Market Street.

A Particular Baptist Chapel built by Dr John Fawcett of the Wainsgate Baptist Church in 1777. It could accommodate 500 to 600 people – for the growing population in the valley at Hebden Bridge.

In 1786, work began on a Sunday School. This was one of the first Baptist Sunday Schools in the country. John Foster taught at the Sunday School.

There is a sundial inscribed

Quod petis umbra est
1833
Lat 53° 48' Ded 3° 40'

In 1846, 8 members left Hebden Bridge to form a Baptist cause in Brearley.

The Ebenezer Church became the Sunday school when the congregation moved to the Hope Baptist Church in 1858. There is a small graveyard in front of the building.

The chapel was later known as Hebden Hall [1873].

The building was later occupied by Kershaw & Ashworth, publishers of the Hebden Bridge Times & Calder Vale Gazette [1880s].

It was then used as an antiques shop.

It is now the Hebden Bridge Arts Centre.

 
Pastors at the Church have included


 

Rev John Crook was instrumental in the establishment of Hope Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge and was Minister there in 1859.

See Ebenezer Chapel, Hebden Bridge Graveyard and Henry Riley

Ebenezer Chapel, Booth
The name for the new chapel built in 1828 at Booth Congregational Church

Ebenezer Chapel, Hebden Bridge: Graveyard
The graveyard for Ebenezer Chapel, Hebden Bridge

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #2

Ebenezer Congregational Church, Summit
Opened in 1834.

 
Pastors at the Church have included


 

Ebenezer Methodist Church, Northowram
Northowram Green.

Aka Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Church, Northowram, Ebenezer Methodist New Connexion Chapel.

Built in 1821.

It accommodated 200 worshippers [1845]

The organ by William Wilkinson was built around 1829. Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register. This was replaced around 1914 by an organ made by Sweetland.

The Church was altered in 1882. Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register Recorded in 1905

See Ebenezer Methodist Sunday School, Northowram and Heywood's Chapel, Northowram

Ebenezer Methodist Church, Pellon Lane

Ebenezer Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Bailiff Bridge
Bradford Road. Designed by Thomas W. Helliwell in 1872 and opened in 1874. It was supported by Bethel Chapel, Brighouse. Previously, services had been held at Square Fold.

Details of the organ in the Chapel can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

New premises were built in 1929.

The Chapel closed after the final worship on 9th September 2012

Ebenezer Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Soyland
Established in 1816 by a group who had left Stones Methodist Church, Ripponden. It was built in 1818 on land given by Richard Habergham.

William Dove taught reading and writing at the Chapel.

It was rebuilt in 1880 at a cost of £16,000.

The gates, the railings, and a section of the graveyard, remain

Ebenezer Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Soyland: Graveyard
The graveyard of Ebenezer Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Soyland.

In May 2008, the Minister at St Paul's Methodist Church, Sowerby Bridge who had responsibility for the Ebenezer Chapel, decided to sell off the graveyard at the Chapel. He abandoned the proposal after a public protest from those who had buried members of their family there.

In October 2009, it was announced that Ripponden Parish Council had bought the graveyard and were working with the Friends of Ebenezer on the future of the site.

In 2010, houses had been built on the site and only the gates remained. A section of the graveyard still remains behind the houses

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #1

Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Chapel, Halifax: Graveyard
The burial ground for Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Chapel.

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #4

Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Church, Halifax
Stands at the junction of St James's Road and Pellon Lane.

The original Church was built by the Primitive Methodists – or Ranters – in 1822.

In 1844, a small Sunday School was built adjoining the Church.

There was a small burial ground in front of the Church. This was removed on 20th October 1905 for road-widening. The graves were transferred and reinterred at Stoney Royd Cemetery [190?]

The new Church – and the Sunday schools alongside – were designed by Walsh & Maddock.

On 28th June 1922, there was a centenary announcement that J. W. Standeven of Skipton, a former scholar and choirmaster, would meet the cost of the new Church, fully equipped, and a new organ, in memory of his mother Charlotte who had been a member of the Church. For a time, the Church was popularly known as Standeven's Chapel.

On 13th January 1923, the corner stone and memorial stones were laid at the new Church. Mrs Standeven laid the foundation stone.

The new Church opened 12th June 1924.

Details of the organ in the Church can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register.

In 1987, the Church was refurbished. A new floor was installed at gallery level to create 2 spaces: the ground floor area becoming a hall (with kitchen), and the upper area used for worship.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

It became a joint Church with Salem Methodist Church.

The Church closed and the last service was held on 8th January 2012.

See Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Church Memorial and Siddal Wesleyan Methodist Church

Ebenezer United Methodist Chapel, Luddenden Dean
Opened in 18??.

Closed in 1???.

Demolished in 1???

See Ebenezer United Methodist Chapel Graveyard, Luddenden Dean and Ebenezer United Methodist Memorial, Luddenden Dean

Ebenezer United Methodist Chapel, Luddenden Graveyard
The burial ground for Ebenezer United Methodist Chapel, Luddenden Dean

The following people, and/or members of their family, were buried and/or have memorials here:


  • To be completed
 

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #3

Elim
A Hebrew word identifying one of the camps used by the Israelites in the Exodus from Egypt

Elim Foursquare Gospel Church
See Elim Pentecostal Church and Hanover Methodist Sunday School

Elim International Christian Network, Sowerby Bridge
The Oasis Family Centre, Ryburn Street

Elim Pentecostal Church, Halifax
Hall Street, Hopwood Lane. Built as the Hanover Methodist Sunday School in 1869. Became Elim Church in 1936.

 
Ministers at the Church have included


 

Demolished for the Burdock Way redevelopment in 1962.

The new church – with its distinctly modern design – was opened in 1970

Elim Pentecostal Church, Sowerby Bridge
Ryburn Street. Opened in 1???

Elland Cemetery
Exley Lane. Aka Elland-cum-Greetland Cemetery, Exley Cemetery.

Begun on 20th June 1860.

It was consecrated on the 30th November 1863 by the Bishop of Ripon on the first visit to Elland by a bishop since before 1688.

There is an Anglican Chapel and a Nonconformist Chapel.

The roof of the Anglican Chapel was badly damaged by gales in February 1949.

See John Eastwood and St Mary the Virgin, Elland Graveyard

Elland Congregational Church
Aka Providence Congregational Church, Elland

Elland-cum-Greetland Cemetery

Elland Hall Chapel
This appears on a list of
Decayed Chapels for want of maintenance in the reign of Queen Elizabeth [the First]

See Elland Hall

Elland Parish Church

Elland Parish Church: Bell-Cote
The bell-cote at the east end of the roof is Norman.

The bell is known as the Sanctus Bell.

It is one of only 7 remaining in England.

Later bells were installed in the Tower

Elland Parish Church: Bells
A church bell is recorded in 1509.

In 1826, the original peal of 6 bells was moved to Methley and replaced by 8 bells at a cost of £550. These were recast in 1894. They are still in used

Elland Parish Church: Clock
The first clock at Elland Parish Church was made by John Bollard in 1671. This was replaced by Sam Ogden.

During a sermon by Rev Irvine on 31st March 1867, one of the weights, weighing 26 cwts, crashed through the floor of the clock chamber to the floor of the church. Panic ensued and women and children screamed, and men left the church, leaving behind them their hats and coats.

The present clock was installed in 1911. It has 4 dials

Elland Parish Church: East Window
The East Window [1490] has a panel Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary [1450] depicting events during the life of Mary.

This is the oldest glass in the church.

The window was damaged by Parliamentarian troops during the Civil War. Only 11 of the original panels remain; the other 10 panels were restored during restoration work of 1856-1866.

The arms of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster – who held Elland as a part of the Honour of Pontefract are also shown in the window. These were originally in the centre of the window and were removed when Rev Francis Musson restored it [1870s].

Rev William Atkinson began restoration work at Elland Church [1840s], raising the floor on which the bell-ringers stood, thereby bringing the whole of the West Window into view.

He died before the work was completed, and Rev Francis Musson continued with the work and with the restoration of the East Window [1856].

The window used to show The Arms of the Stansfeld family of Elland, but these were lost during the restoration of the window

Elland Parish Church: Font
The font at Elland Parish Church was removed during the Commonwealth Period and a plain basin was used for baptisms.

A new font was installed in 1662.

A new one was installed in the 1800s.

In 1865, this was removed and the earlier font reinstated.

The Miserere Seats are either side of the font

Elland Parish Church: Graveyard

Elland Parish Church: Hope Chest
The Hope Chest in Elland Parish Church was carved by Miss Beatrice Lumb in 1911.

It was given to the Church in her memory

Elland Parish Church: Miserere Seats
These wooden seats were originally in the Chancel of Elland Parish Church.

They were moved in the 1700s and placed either side of the Font.

They are over 500 years old

Elland Parish Church: Organ
The organ at Elland Parish Church was originally on the gallery across the chancel arch.

In 1853, a new organ was installed on the ground floor.

A later organ by organ was built [between 1872 and 1893] by Alex Young of Manchester.

In 1949, this was rebuilt by Binns, Fitton & Haley of Leeds.

Details can be found in the National Pipe Organ Register

Elland Parish Church: Paintings of Moses & Aaron
Two large paintings – one of Moses and the other of his brother Aaron – hang on the south wall of Elland Parish Church. They originally hung on either side of the altar.

In the 19th century, legal proceedings were taken when the churchwardens of other chapels in the district refused to pay for the restoration of the paintings.

Getting married before Moses and Aaron

was a metaphor for a marriage at Elland Church

Elland Parish Church: Pews
The 17th century box pews at Elland Parish Church were replaced in July 1865, when W. H. Crossland carried out restoration work.

It is said that Northend Nicholl defended his family pew with drawn sword

Elland Parish Church: Porch
The south porch is the main entrance to Elland Parish Church. It was built in 1696 to replace the original 15th century porch. The Sundial from the 15th century porch can be seen above the entrance

Elland Parish Church: Pulpit
There was a 3-decker pulpit in Elland Parish Church.

In 1853, a new oak pulpit and reading desk were installed in memory of Rev David Meredith

Elland Parish Church: Rood Screen
The rood screen in Elland Parish Church was designed by George Halford Fellowes Prynne. It shows the figures of Christ, St Mary and St John.

It was installed in memory of Canon Winter who died in the vestry here.

In 19??, it was moved to the west end of the church

Elland Parish Church: Royal Arms
In 1725, John Aked produced the King's Arms for Elland Parish Church.

In 1728, Joseph Aked did work on the Royal Arms

Elland Parish Church: Saint John's Choir
The south choir at Elland Parish Church is known as St John's Choir, and the north choir is St Nicholas's Choir

Elland Parish Church: Saint Mary's Choir
The chancel at Elland Parish Church is known as St Mary's Choir

Elland Parish Church: Saint Nicholas's Choir
The north choir at Elland Parish Church is known as St Nicholas's Choir, and the south choir is St John's Choir

Elland Parish Church: Sundial
The Sundial from the original 15th century porch can be seen above the entrance at the south porch

Elland Parish Church: Tower
The tower of Elland Parish Church was added in 1490.

The entrance to the Tower was originally from inside the Church. The external door was added later.

There is a stairway leading to the ringing chamber, the clock chamber, the bell chamber, and the roof

In 1859, the Tower was restored and the illuminated clock was installed

Elland Parish Church: Vestry
The vestry at Elland Parish Church was built in 1879, in memory of Dame Amy Savile of Rufford Abbey.

It is reached by a door in the south wall

Elland Parish Church: West Window
The West Window in the tower – made by Wailes of Newcastle – commemorate Rev Christopher Atkinson and his son Christopher.

Rev William Atkinson began restoration work at Elland Church, raising the floor on which the bell-ringers stood, thereby bringing the whole of the West Window into view.

He died before the work was completed, and Rev Francis Musson continued with the work and with the restoration of the East Window.

Other windows at the west end of the aisles contain pieces of mediæval glass from the East Window and other damaged windows in the Church

Elland Parsonage
The parsonage for Elland Church is recorded at The Cross

Elland Particular Baptist Church
Jepson Lane. Established in 1772.

The Church was built in 1789 by James Ashworth or John Ashworth, with support from Dr John Fawcett.

 
Pastors at the Church have included


 

Rev John Hindle moved to Blackley Baptist Church – he preached his last service at Elland in September 1792 – and shortly afterwards, the Elland Church closed because most of the congregation followed him to Blackley.

The houses occupied by the minister and the caretaker became the Rising Sun pub.

In 1894, the Misses Ashworth gave the building to the Rector and Churchwardens of Elland to be used for church purposes. They endowed it with funds for its upkeep.

During the 19th century, it was used as the Boys' Sunday School for the Parish Church. From 1895, it was used as a parish hall.

It was demolished when Jepson Lane was widened [1920]. The stone was used to rebuild the Rising Sun which was demolished and rebuilt at the same time.

The graveyard is still there.

See Elland Parochial Hall

Elland Particular Baptist Church: Graveyard
Jepson Lane.

Elland Particular Baptist Church was demolished in the 1920s.

The graveyard is still there

Elland Pleasant Sunday Afternoon Society
A Pleasant Sunday Afternoon group at Elland.

Recorded around 1914, when Arthur Wilde was a member


Question: Does anyone know which Church / Chapel this was associated with?

 

Elland Unitarian Chapel
Aka Southend Chapel, Southgate Chapel.

In 1685, Nonconformist meetings were held at the home of John Brooksbank. In 1697, Oliver Heywood records that a chapel was opened.

Around 1785, the chapel was rebuilt.

On 5th June 1866, it was superseded by the new Christ's Chapel, Elland. The site of the old chapel

was given up for the purposes of forming a new street

See Elland Unitarian Chapel Graveyard

Elland Unitarian Chapel: Graveyard
The graveyard of Elland Unitarian Chapel

Elland Wesley

Elland Wesleyan Chapel
Popularly known as Dog Lane Chapel, Elland Wesley. This is the huge building just south along Huddersfield Road from Elland Bridge. It was built in 1807 and opened on 4th October 1808. It accommodated 600 worshippers. There was a large burial ground.

In 1860, the Chapel was altered.

A school room was added to the east of the Chapel.

In 1871, there was a split in the Southgate Reformers over a question of total abstinence.

The date stone of the present building shows AD 1875. On Good Friday 26th March 1875, Charles Horsfall Denham laid a stone for the Chapel.

Around 1875, a group of strict temperance Methodists parted company with the Methodists at Elland Wesley and established the Temperance Methodist Chapel, Elland.

By the 1880s, the Chapel had become too small. Adjacent land was acquired and a new Chapel was built. The memorial stones were laid in August 1891. The building opened on 4th October 1892. It was designed by Waddington's of Manchester & Burnley. It accommodated 750 worshippers and cost £5,300. It has galleries on 3 sides. John Dewhirst placed a large stained-glass window in the front of the Chapel in memory of his family.

Around 1904, the 1st Elland Company Boys' Brigade was formed.

The Harold Savage Hall stands next door.

On 16th June 1914, a new 3-manual organ was presented to the Church.

The last service was held on 7th July 1974. The congregation merged with Middle Dean Street Chapel, West Vale – See St Paul's Methodist Chapel, Elland.

The building was bought by Nu-Swift. It is currently empty and unloved.

 
Ministers at the Chapel have included


 

See Elland Wesleyan Chapel and The history of Elland Wesley

Elland Wesleyan Chapel: Graveyard
The burial ground for Elland Wesleyan Chapel

Some of the monumental inscriptions in the graveyard are shown in the CD entitled Halifax Monumental Inscriptions #4

Emmaeus, Halifax
18 Savile Park Street. Recorded in 1905

Episcopal Chapel, Rishworth
The photograph of Rishworth School Chapel is captioned Episcopal Chapel, Rishworth

Episcopal Chapel, Sowerby Bridge
A name which has been used for Christ Church, Sowerby Bridge

Evangelical Church, Brighouse
Bradford Road. Established in 19?? in the former Thornhill Briggs Co-operative Store

Exley Cemetery


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 17:16 on 10th October 2017 / c109_e / 59